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  #11  
Old 04-10-2017
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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adjust my gait to a smoother more relaxed, slightly higher cadence cycle
And thats a technique that also can make your swimming faster and easier if your stroke is a touch too long. (Toms experience?)
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2017
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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Originally Posted by Zenturtle View Post
And thats a technique that also can make your swimming faster and easier if your stroke is a touch too long. (Toms experience?)
That's exactly what I was thinking. When I was running semi-seriously (5 years ago?) I had great success with Chi Running--careful attention to technique and posture cured my chronic over-striding and heel striking, and led to increased pace with reduced effort. That's kind of what I'm discovering with higher SPL work now in my swimming.

I think as my body gradually adapts physiologically and neurally to the faster tempos in my USRPT sessions, I can start to bring SPL down slightly and still keep the speed and efficiency. We'll see... In the back of my head I suspect I'll always be biased in favor of lower SPLs.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2017
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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I find longer or shorter strokes in swimming or longer strides in running compare reasonably well.
I can make my stroke longer by stretching out more at the front and through the whole body, extent the arm and curl with a high elbow just a bit further upfront to get hold on te water 10 cm further every stroke and push out at the back fully too, gaining another 5-10 cm.
That way I have to overcome internal resistance because the body movements travel through the limits of the range of motion, where there is internal tissue friction to overcome. Thats waisted power.
In a fast swim this waisted extra internal friction power is relative small to the total power output, so its worthwile to spend it to increase strokelength and couple the ends of the long strokes better to the starts of the following.
This way it can happen that strokelengths even increase at higher swimspeeds.
If available effective strokelength is fully utilized, DPS starts to fall again at further increased speed.
At low speeds gliding long between strokes doesnt hurt so much because the drag is low anyway at low speeds so the deceleration isnt so severe.
Many different sweet spots for various speeds.
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  #14  
Old 04-11-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Originally Posted by Zenturtle View Post
And thats a technique that also can make your swimming faster and easier if your stroke is a touch too long. (Toms experience?)
When I narrated my own transcendental experience in tweaking my running cadence in real time during a running race, I risked raising an inappropriate analogy in this TI swimming forum.

I want to emphasize that I am not (necessarily) advocating a faster turnover and shorter stroke in anyone's swimming in particular. In general, my observation is that inexperienced runners tend to adopt a long loping bouncy stride which is in general inefficient for running. The time spent in the air uses up energy that is better spent going forwards, and also takes a toll in the cumulative increased landing shock forces. Such runners would be better served by training specifically to adopt and maintain a shorter stride/higher cadence at the same running pace, which is neurologically and biomechanically not easy or natural to do. But once you have trained to do it, you can maintain it, and it actually is more economical of your energy output.

In contrast, inexperienced or lesser trained swimmers tend to have a shorter stroke/higher stroke rate at any given swim pace than they would if they were better trained. This observation is in keeping with the TI teaching model. The percentage of swimmers who habitually race (or swimming purely for a speed trial) at too low an SPL(i.e. they would be better served by consciously raising their SPL at racing speed) must be quite low in my estimation. (I'm not counting those that train at a low SPL to develop and solidify this low SPL skill who would speed up if they appropriately raised their SPL somewhat in a time trial).

Apart from the reciprocal relationship of cadence in these two activities (expert swimmers requiring special skill and practice to achieve long stroke length, expert runners taking special skill and practice to achieve a faster stride turnover at a given pace) I find these two aspects an interesting parallel between the two sports, in that they represent a specific skill that is not straightforward to acquire both in concept and in actual difficulty of acquisition, but once achieved, or even with the onset of ever increasing acquisition, the economy of propulsion is enhanced, and speed is increased whether in competition or in training, with the same expenditure of energy.

Last edited by sclim : 04-11-2017 at 07:13 PM.
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