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  #1  
Old 08-15-2009
Alex-SG Alex-SG is offline
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Alex-SG
Default Do different body shapes require TI adjustments?

What are typical TI adjustments you make to account for your individual body characteristics?

Assuming 3 swimmers with similar experience and ability but "different bodies".

TYPE A: Short swimmer (may be short arms, short legs)
TYPE B: Tall Swimmer (very long legs, difficult to keep balance even by keeping head down and relaxed)
TYPE C: Muscular swimmer, low body fat, tendency to be a sinker

I assume they woud not be taught to swim TI exactly in the same way, right?
For example could a TYPE B possibly be told: "Son, forget about the 2BK, you need to kick regulalry to keep those legs from sinking! "

Thank you in advance for your views on this. ALEX
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  #2  
Old 08-15-2009
atreides atreides is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex-SG View Post
What are typical TI adjustments you make to account for your individual body characteristics?

Assuming 3 swimmers with similar experience and ability but "different bodies".

TYPE A: Short swimmer (may be short arms, short legs)
TYPE B: Tall Swimmer (very long legs, difficult to keep balance even by keeping head down and relaxed)
TYPE C: Muscular swimmer, low body fat, tendency to be a sinker

I assume they woud not be taught to swim TI exactly in the same way, right?
For example could a TYPE B possibly be told: "Son, forget about the 2BK, you need to kick regulalry to keep those legs from sinking! "

Thank you in advance for your views on this. ALEX
Excellent question. I've often wondered if I have a built in disavantage bing tall and rlatively long legged. Phelps is tall but extremely short legged. I read that Shinji believes that Japanese swimmers have an advantage because they have relatively long torsos . Of course I have have large flat feet which I would think would be an advantage (you couldn't tell it by the way I move a kick board) and long arms and big hands. I have found that the 2BK is actually more beneficial because it seems to allow me to focus on the proper way to kick. I'm right handed but my left legged kick is extremely powerful (probably because i breathe to my right). The body posture problem you high light is real for me but I find that I am learning how to maintain vertical balance so that it is less of an issue. I think that I have definitely had to make more adjustments than the average swimmer but the key thing is that it is possible to make them. It may take longer to build the neural pathways but once you do then the advantages that your particular body type brings can be experienced also.
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  #3  
Old 08-15-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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I believe there are thousands of body type differences that will affect how I describe movements and what I prescribe. Of the ones you mentioned:

Very lean swimmers usually need to keep more air in their lungs. They breath from half lung to full lung. As soon as they let out too much air, the become rocks.

In my experience, leaner people also have to swim a little flatter to give the water more to support. Those more buoyancy gifted have a bit more flexibility in how far they rotate.

Longer limbed people often have a harder time with balance. I focus more on taking advantage of more extreme front quadrant timing to balance out their legs. If they have long legs, they usually also have long arms so really keep them in front.

Matbe I would say I wouldn't teach them differently, I just know that different focal points tend to be more powerful for different swimmers.
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  #4  
Old 08-16-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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[quote=splashingpat;5178]a just wanted to ADD this to the equation!
and FAT FOLKS
have a little rougher time fitting thru the tiniest hole in the water!
it?

Pat


Yes ,maybe but the idea of the way to think about slipping through the smallest hole should be the same for everyone .

Hello Pat !


Dave

Last edited by daveblt : 08-17-2009 at 02:30 AM.
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  #5  
Old 08-16-2009
Alex-SG Alex-SG is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachEricD View Post
Very lean swimmers usually need to keep more air in their lungs. They breath from half lung to full lung. As soon as they let out too much air, the become rocks.

In my experience, leaner people also have to swim a little flatter to give the water more to support. Those more buoyancy gifted have a bit more flexibility in how far they rotate.
This is interesting, it reminds me of the breathing thread in which we discussed, for bilateral swimming, whether it is better to:
a. INHALE, EXHALE, EXHALE, EXHALE, INHALE again (progressive air out)
b. INHALE, HOLD, HOLD, EXHALE-all, INHALE again (hold air until the last moment)

I do become a rock when I exhale everything too fast. On the other hand option b. does keep my head at the surface and makes it possible to inhale.
May be ATREIDES (who seems to have the same body shape as me) experiences the same problem ?

Everybody says that method a. is more natural and it is not good to store CO2 in the lungs. But is b. a "NO-NO" or an acceptable option for long-legged/sinker-type of people?

SPLASHING PAT: As far as "Fat people" are concerned, they usually enjoy great buoyancy in the water. I am sure they need less TI adjustments than us ("long legged, heavy bones people").
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  #6  
Old 08-17-2009
Claire Claire is offline
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Along the same lines, I've been wondering whether women should have the same high elbow position as men during the recovery phase? When I watch the Outside the Box DVD, it appears to me as though the women do not have as extreme an angle as the men. I've been focusing on my elbow during recovery and have been studying the DVD and I am having a heck of a time getting it as high as the men do. Perhaps it is an illusion, but it really does look to me like the men have a more extreme recovery position.

Claire
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  #7  
Old 08-17-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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Claire,
I have not noticed a need for male/female differences in recovery. Thinking theoretically, since women tend to have less muscular arms, it might require a wider track to feel the gravity pulling you into the switch. I think there is a general pattern that men have longer arms (I love the term "ape-index" for this). That might make it appear that the elbows are higher. But I have not noticed anything too consistent. Others may have.
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  #8  
Old 08-18-2009
splashingpat splashingpat is offline
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splashingpat
Default lean, mean fitting machine..vs fat, nice, and relaxin' and lettin IT just happen!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex-SG View Post
This is interesting, it reminds me of the breathing thread in which we discussed, for bilateral swimming, whether it is better to:
a. INHALE, EXHALE, EXHALE, EXHALE, INHALE again (progressive air out)
b. INHALE, HOLD, HOLD, EXHALE-all, INHALE again (hold air until the last moment)

I do become a rock when I exhale everything too fast. On the other hand option b. does keep my head at the surface and makes it possible to inhale.
May be ATREIDES (who seems to have the same body shape as me) experiences the same problem ?

Everybody says that method a. is more natural and it is not good to store CO2 in the lungs. But is b. a "NO-NO" or an acceptable option for long-legged/sinker-type of people?
Challenges of swim!
SPLASHING PAT: As far as "Fat people" are concerned, they usually enjoy great buoyancy in the water. I am sure they need less TI adjustments than us ("long legged, heavy bones people").


NOTE FROM PAT!!!!!!!!!
i hope this helps!

Challenges of swim!
there are challenges,

Hi lean, muscular guys...envying the FAT ONES!
pAT

who wins the medals?
think of that?

P.S. (madvet...your not mad at me?)

ALEX thanks for your post....
i thnk...you will figure this all out!
What shape do you want?

Last edited by splashingpat : 08-18-2009 at 05:48 PM.
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