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  #1  
Old 03-29-2009
saveup saveup is offline
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Default How deep should your target arm be in the water

After going throught TI School, The drills had us going into the water about 12 to 24 inches or even more. But after looking at some video's from Shinji, Terry, etc. there arms appear to be going into the water less than 6 inches. Is this an illustion. The deep of your target arm is very important because this one of basic's of balance. So im getting a little confuse about the dept of the arm that enters the water. Help
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  #2  
Old 03-30-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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You may have to experiment with the depth of the lead arm.Keep a relaxed hand with fingers slightly open and hand below elbow as it reaches forward .In no case should the lead hand be higher than the shoulder .You should try to find the optimal point to reach down where you are feeling balanced but not too deep and you have trouble finding air . You may find that the more you keep the head and spine aligned with the neck and head relaxed , lean in to the water , and keep the whole body relaxed that you may not need to reach down too far but it all depends for each person.Take a look at this article.

http://fdscoaching.com/Newsletter6article.html


Dave
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  #3  
Old 03-30-2009
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daveblt View Post
You may have to experiment with the depth of the lead arm.Keep a relaxed hand with fingers slightly open and hand below elbow as it reaches forward .In no case should the lead hand be higher than the shoulder .You should try to find the optimal point to reach down where you are feeling balanced but not too deep and you have trouble finding air . You may find that the more you keep the head and spine aligned with the neck and head relaxed , lean in to the water , and keep the whole body relaxed that you may not need to reach down too far but it all depends for each person.Take a look at this article.
+1

(stupid 10 character min limit)
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  #4  
Old 03-30-2009
Lloyd Lloyd is offline
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does this mean that if I am having trouble finding air and when I turn to breath and I am 1-2 " below the surface I'm driving my lead arm too deep? and Can you explain the benefit of fist gloves.
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  #5  
Old 03-30-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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Lloyd,
First the easy question. Fist gloves are one of my favorite toys. They take away most of your sensation of pressure on your hand. This forces you to catch water with your whole arm and move with your body. They make it much harder to cheat because you don't have enough grip on the water to get anything out of your hands.

Your second question can be lots of things. Please remember that you have to look at your body as a whole, not individual parts. If you are underwater water when trying to breathe, common problems are:
1. you may be rolling your head before your body. Your body sits lower in the water when you are on your side, so your face will be underwater if you roll your head first. If you are trying to breath in sweet spot, try thinking about breathing with your belly button. Rolling from the hips often helps that.

2. You may be breathing too late. If your recovering arm is out of the water when you try to get air, it will push you underwater, especially at slow speeds. I like to think "roll away from the spear" so that I am rolling to air as I spear one arm. That way, both arms are in the water as I begin to breathe.

3. Your head may be too low when swimming. This is common in people trying to understand head down and head spine line concepts.

4. Your lead arm may be too low (as you suggested). Although, the vast majority of people enter their arms too high, then let them drift to a too low position. One of my favorite focal points for arm depth is to skate and let your hand hit the wall on the + at the end of the lane (most pools have this marking). Most beginners will have to have their hand hit the lower portion of the cross bar. As you learn the core awareness and your body does more of the balance work, you may be able to raise it up to the top of the cross bar, but not higher. It is amazingly difficult to find where "deeper than your shoulder" is in the water.

5. Your body may be too loose or curved. If your body is not strait from the crown of your head to the toes, you can end up under water.

I hope I gave you a few things to explore.
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  #6  
Old 03-30-2009
saveup saveup is offline
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Default Coach Eric

At what speed is optimum or stroke count should one be trying to achieve to get a since of correct speed in the water. Should I strive to achieve 19 strokes per 25 meters? I notice sometimes when I go faster I do not glide as much, but when I go slower I really glide but sink more at the same time.
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  #7  
Old 03-31-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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Saveup,
speed and stroke count are very individual things and they change as your skill grows. Your goals are to decrease stroke count so you have more count options as you swim, increase tempo so you can go faster at each stroke count, and do each easier so you can go longer. For example, I can get down to 10 strokes on a good day (25yds). That gives me a slow time, a good muscle workout, and a great concentration workout. I usually practice at 14-16 strokes and my sprints are upwards of 18 (I'm working on lowering that.)
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  #8  
Old 03-31-2009
terry terry is offline
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Default How Deep should your hand be in Skate (and Switches and Strokes)

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To answer your original question: Your hand should be in the farthest forward position in which:
1) You have your (loosely separated) fingers down and palm back. I.E. Hang, don't place, your hand.
2) You have some slope between your elbow and wrist. I.E. Wrist and elbow should not be on the same plane.
3) You feel balanced and supported. I.E. You can maintain a relaxed and streamlined kick.

This is the "X-axis coordinate" for the X/Y targets you need to establish for your hands in your Skating practice, as illustrated in Lessons Two and Three of Easy Freestyle. (The Y-axis position is on, or slightly outside, your shoulder line.)

Why should this X-axis hand position be as far forward as possible? Because this is the position you will drive your body past when you shift your weight -- or drive the high hip -- in Switches and Strokes. This is taught in Lessons Three and Four.

But it's critical to take all the time needed to establish it. Want to know a good drill sequence for imprinting this? See the recommendation I made for a regular warmup/rehearsal routine I suggested in the Heavily Muscular thread.
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  #9  
Old 03-31-2009
saveup saveup is offline
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Default Thanks its good to hear from the Pro's

Thank you very much for all whom respond in helping me understand swimming. Me be a perfectionist causes me to be a slow learner. It appears that swimming can be a rocket science type of sports
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