Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-11-2016
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 671
jenson1a
Default Viewing Videos

Lots of swimmers have posted videos of their swimming and I am amazed at what many critics point out at what they are viewing. I just had cataract surgery and I had hoped that my eyesight would gain me more insight on videos, but not so. I use internet explorer to view the videos (most recent version), but fail to see what so many observers point out. I do know that if I open the TI website in Chrome, I have the ability to use slow motion on a video and this does help a lot.

Are there any other ways (better) other than Chrome or internet explorer?

While reading this, it came to mind that it also takes the knowledge of TI to give a good analysis of someone's stroke. But there is more than this--a lot of videos (to me) are too blurry or far away to make any judgments.

Any thoughts on this? I know that Coach Stuart (and many others)give very detailed analysis on the videos posted. Any and all hints would be appreciated.

Sherry
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-11-2016
borate borate is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 533
borate
Default

Downloading a video and loading it into a versatile player may help with analysis.
The free MPC-HC, for one, can step a frame at a time, change speed, etc.
https://mpc-hc.org/
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-12-2016
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 671
jenson1a
Default

that sounds great==will download. Glad I didn't switch to Windows 10--my take is that they don't support the media player that I have on Windows 7

Sherry
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-12-2016
borate borate is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 533
borate
Default

What player would that be? Win 10 here supports Windows Media Player and MPC-HC (and no doubt others as well). There have been issues regarding the autoplay feature, but those usually can be resolved.

VLC is another popular media player - free.
http://www.videolan.org/vlc/index.html
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-15-2016
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 671
jenson1a
Default

Borate

Thanks for the link. Downloaded it the other day and have been watching some of my prior videos. This is a fantastic viewing tool for me.

As for windows 10, the way I heard was that it carried over all the files from Windows 7, but not the media player. Good to know that there are free substitutes.

Once again tks for the link

Sherry
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-15-2016
borate borate is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 533
borate
Default

Glad you're on the right rail. ^_^
W10 still has its media player, but it won't natively play DVDs. Perhaps that's what you heard. Both MPC-HC and VLC will.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-17-2016
sclim sclim is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,499
sclim
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jenson1a View Post
Lots of swimmers have posted videos of their swimming and I am amazed at what many critics point out at what they are viewing. I just had cataract surgery and I had hoped that my eyesight would gain me more insight on videos, but not so. I use internet explorer to view the videos (most recent version), but fail to see what so many observers point out. I do know that if I open the TI website in Chrome, I have the ability to use slow motion on a video and this does help a lot.

Are there any other ways (better) other than Chrome or internet explorer?

While reading this, it came to mind that it also takes the knowledge of TI to give a good analysis of someone's stroke. But there is more than this--a lot of videos (to me) are too blurry or far away to make any judgments.

Any thoughts on this? I know that Coach Stuart (and many others)give very detailed analysis on the videos posted. Any and all hints would be appreciated.

Sherry
Sherry: I think I know what you mean. But I think the critical difference is not our tired old eyes. Slow-motion capability may not give us the edge that we hope we might need. It's the experienced coach's prior knowledge and insight from years with prior proteges that leads them into picking up changes in overall momentum and body angulation and alignment that are too subtle for us to see yet. This insight gets them zooming in on areas that they get to know from prior experience -- for instance symptom X is caused by faults P, Q, R or S -- any one, or more in combination, so by process of elimination they get a diagnosis far faster than we would. The interesting thing is how they are able to explain the diagnostic and elimination process to us, and if they are patient enough to step it through, and if we are patient and persistent enough to follow through step by step (and sometimes it can get very complicated, in an areas where we have no previous practical experience) we just might learn something. Or not LOL.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-17-2016
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 671
jenson1a
Default

sclim

But it is not just experienced coaches that give detailed analyses, there are several posters who give very concrete explanations of what might be wrong. (Won't embarrass anyone by naming the ones that I think do a good job). But you are right--there is nothing better than good old experience.

In another thread, a swimmer asked viewers to critique his video. Coach Stuart asked viewers what we thought about the video and what would cause the problems This type of analysis (I thought) was not only good for the swimmer, but also for us reading that forum.

Sherry
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-17-2016
Danny Danny is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,442
Danny
Default

Hi Sherry,

I'll just throw something out here which may or may not help. We just got a smart TV, 50 '' on the diagonal, and you won't find any PC monitor that is that big. Smart TVs can access internet and YouTube. I have played around with this and found it interesting. In the end, the limiting factor becomes the resolution of the video, not the resolution of the screen you are viewing it on, but a smart TV might help.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-18-2016
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 671
jenson1a
Default

Thanks Danny for the tip. It's almost a timely one. Our 8 year old 55 inch Tobisha is showing signs of decay. Am reluctant to replace it since there is not a lot of good TV these days. But I have heard a lot of good about the smart TV. (Too bad there aren't more "smart" programs!)

Appreciate your post

Sherry
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.