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  #1  
Old 02-21-2014
Rajan Rajan is offline
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Default Weak Core

I came across this good video on core to check if it is weak.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvCveZF8kV8

Further, Can anybody guide me if the weak core be made strong by exercise.


Regards,
Rajan
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  #2  
Old 02-21-2014
Danny Danny is offline
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Interesting video. I would take the last part of this video most seriously. He notes that good strength in the core muscles is not enough. You have to learn how to use them, how to sense when you are using them (proprioception) and be in the habit of using them. In my experience, this is the most challenging part of the program. I'm guessing that learning how to use them is application specific and using them is swimming is different from using them in, for example, running or standing. For whatever it's worth, here is an exercise that is easy to do and I find helps me. Every morning, or as often as possible, I lie on the floor, flat on my back with my hands at my sides. I then take about a minute or two to assess the position of my core. Exactly where are the points of contact between my body and the floor? Ideally they should be as large as possible, without straining core muscles, but it is worth playing around with activating core muscles to understand how these contact areas change. Are there asymmetries in the contact areas? This is an evolutionary process and the changes take place over weeks. The purpose of this exercise is to make you aware of issues you might have. As you do this, you will find yourself being more conscious of them during your daily movement and you will start consciously working your core muscles throughout the day to address them. At least that is my experience.
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  #3  
Old 02-21-2014
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajan View Post
I came across this good video on core to check if it is weak.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvCveZF8kV8

Further, Can anybody guide me if the weak core be made strong by exercise.


Regards,
Rajan
i think the first thing to do is planks. i have not found a good plank video yet but will post if/when i do. this will improve your basic strength in holding your torso in position. it is absolutely important that you learn the correct position for your torso during planks which is why i haven't found a good video for this yet.

the second thing to do are rolling patterns:

Rolling Patterns - First master:

Upper and Lower Body Rolling Patterns
http://youtu.be/1scfzwCF1bk

Then practice:

Hard Roll
http://youtu.be/bGgBdxs4m90
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  #4  
Old 02-22-2014
Superfly Superfly is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajan View Post
...Can anybody guide me if the weak core be made strong by exercise.
Of course! Weak core muscles can be made strong by exercise.

However, that is a misleading answer because strength is only one aspect. There is also proper alignment which is achieved by awareness and stretching.

The reason is that core muscles pull on the spine and that may result in a mis-aligned spine, leading to pain or injury.

For example, the psoas muscle can shorten over time because of prolonged sitting (in an office or watching TV at home). This shortened psoas muscle will end up pulling on the spine, resulting in back pain. In this case, strengthening the psoas muscle will only result in even more pain.

A better approach is stretching in combination with strengthening. Swimming is great for both.
Yoga is good for awareness and stretching.

Last edited by Superfly : 02-22-2014 at 12:38 AM.
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  #5  
Old 02-22-2014
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachDavidShen View Post
i think the first thing to do is planks. i have not found a good plank video yet but will post if/when i do. this will improve your basic strength in holding your torso in position. it is absolutely important that you learn the correct position for your torso during planks which is why i haven't found a good video for this yet.

the second thing to do are rolling patterns:

Rolling Patterns - First master:

Upper and Lower Body Rolling Patterns
http://youtu.be/1scfzwCF1bk

Then practice:

Hard Roll
http://youtu.be/bGgBdxs4m90
i should also say that strength here for your torso does not mean bigger muscles. your goal is not a visible six pack. you more than likely have enough muscle fibers to perform the task. the problem is that you don't have core control during swimming, and likely during other types of physical activity as well.

when strength is developed, you should think of it as both a physical and neurological thing. and you should always start in static conditions, moving next to dynamic conditions.

hence, i recommend starting with planks (static) to develop the ability to hold your torso in proper position. it also means that you should be developing your posture while you stand and sit.

then once you have some development with planks, you can try rolling patterns to help you control your core in a dynamic situation. you can see that rolling patterns are very much like what we do when we swim. we have to rotate from side to side, just like the rolling drills.

one thing you can try is before you swim a length, get down on the pool deck and do a plank for 30sec. then go swim. does it feel different in terms of your core control?

have a look at these and report back your progress!
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  #6  
Old 02-22-2014
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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David Shen, what do you think of this planking technique? This is a local personal trainer and I went to her studio to film some stuff and put a few collections together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yFtmkYcZEY
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  #7  
Old 02-22-2014
Rajan Rajan is offline
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In april 1st week swimming session will start here. Till that time i will focus on what you told. Moreover, i would like to know - does head stand (yoga posture) require core strength because that i can do very well. Why i am worried on the core issue is that long working hrs in office has started the problem of back pain and i dont want my swimming practice be affected.

Thanks -Rajan


Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachDavidShen View Post
i should also say that strength here for your torso does not mean bigger muscles. your goal is not a visible six pack. you more than likely have enough muscle fibers to perform the task. the problem is that you don't have core control during swimming, and likely during other types of physical activity as well.

when strength is developed, you should think of it as both a physical and neurological thing. and you should always start in static conditions, moving next to dynamic conditions.

hence, i recommend starting with planks (static) to develop the ability to hold your torso in proper position. it also means that you should be developing your posture while you stand and sit.

then once you have some development with planks, you can try rolling patterns to help you control your core in a dynamic situation. you can see that rolling patterns are very much like what we do when we swim. we have to rotate from side to side, just like the rolling drills.

one thing you can try is before you swim a length, get down on the pool deck and do a plank for 30sec. then go swim. does it feel different in terms of your core control?

have a look at these and report back your progress!
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  #8  
Old 02-23-2014
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajan View Post
In april 1st week swimming session will start here. Till that time i will focus on what you told. Moreover, i would like to know - does head stand (yoga posture) require core strength because that i can do very well. Why i am worried on the core issue is that long working hrs in office has started the problem of back pain and i dont want my swimming practice be affected.

Thanks -Rajan
yes it does require core strength to hold your body erect while on your head. however, movement patterns do not translate, so if your muscles activate in one instance, they may not activate in another. that is why i was specific in saying that you may not have core control while swimming. it is entirely possible you have core control in other situations.

so how long do you hold your yoga pose for? it is possible that you do not need to plank. you can try a plank and see how long you can hold it for. if you can hold it for upwards of a minute, then you can move on to rolling patterns. i've found that rolling patterns are the closest to the movement while swimming. if you can execute those, it will go well in translating to swimming situations.

you should also think on what you said about sitting long hours and back pain. here i would recommend that you think about training 24/7. what i mean by that is mostly attention to posture and holding it 24/7 while standing and sitting. you should research the proper way to sit and work to hold that for as long as possible while you work, and make it so natural that even though you're focusing on work your body unconsciously holds proper posture. you should also get up and vary position and not get stuck too long in any one position.
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  #9  
Old 02-23-2014
Danny Danny is offline
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Another thing consider is to rearrange your working situation so that you work standing up or, better yet, so that you have the optioon to work standing or sitting. I have not been able to get this done at my workplace, but I have heard good things about it from others.
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  #10  
Old 02-26-2014
Rajan Rajan is offline
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Headstand I can hold for 3-4 minutes. I tried to do plank for one minute. I can hold for 1 minute, but body starts shaking.

Regards

Rajan

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachDavidShen View Post
so how long do you hold your yoga pose for? it is possible that you do not need to plank. you can try a plank and see how long you can hold it for. if you can hold it for upwards of a minute, then you can move on to rolling patterns. i've found that rolling patterns are the closest to the movement while swimming. if you can execute those, it will go well in translating to swimming situations.
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