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  #1  
Old 11-05-2013
AWP AWP is offline
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Default Improve your Mojo

A refreshing set to develop 'easy' speed and feel effortless doing so. Staying within a narrow range of stroke rates, using the Tempo Trainer, to gradually improve pace by slowing first then incrementally quickening rate.

Monday Nov 4 @ YMCA 25 yard pool
After a 25+ min. "pull set"; feeling pulled towards 'speed'
50s @
TT 1.04
1.06
1.05
1.04 (:40)
I only marked time on the final 50, using initial ones to groove myself to tempo and intended to compare with subsequent rounds. If SL remains or improves and times remain or improve I'll know where to move next.
TT 1:02
1:04
1:03
1:02 (:39)
Again only marked final 50. My main focus now to keep it consistent, push off @ 3 beeps, streamlined 'perfectly' to first stroke, make it feel easy. SL actually improved on a couple initial lengths.
TT 1:00
1:02
1:01
1:00 (:38)
The "pull" to initiate a firmer hold and more pronounced kick was there but I really wanted effort to remain the same, make it just as easy as previously and felt I did. Now, I felt a tightening in my right calf which distracted me a bit a felt it kept me from marking a 'solid' :38 (coming in @ approx. :38.8). I still marked the :38 because I felt I met my intent.
Now I wanted to see if I could match time/ effort while slowing tempo, to 1.02, but this time my calf did indeed cramp and had to restart. I'm afraid this was a distraction I did not want, calf still tight, and after retrying came in @ :39, I immediately followed with a 50 @ 1.00 and came in on :38.9s, so I ended the exercise. If there was to be no 'easy' improvement I would halt and mark metrics for my next practice.
I'll continue this process but probably move to extend distances to 75s and then 100s for I feel this is the area where I'd like to focus myself for improved pace for distance. I've found it doesn't take much more than 100s practice of this focus, perhaps 150s, to improve overall pace for extended distances of 400+.
Having said that, open water practice swims of 2- 10k and "mojo" warm ups of 10- 25 minutes do help with the process, as long as overall technique play out. The choices in focus for this are endless and should continue or halt accordingly.

Cheers
Alan
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  #2  
Old 11-15-2013
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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always interesting to read your thought process.
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  #3  
Old 11-15-2013
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWP View Post
A refreshing set to develop 'easy' speed and feel effortless doing so. Staying within a narrow range of stroke rates, using the Tempo Trainer, to gradually improve pace by slowing first then incrementally quickening rate.

Monday Nov 4 @ YMCA 25 yard pool
After a 25+ min. "pull set"; feeling pulled towards 'speed'
50s @
TT 1.04
1.06
1.05
1.04 (:40)
I only marked time on the final 50, using initial ones to groove myself to tempo and intended to compare with subsequent rounds. If SL remains or improves and times remain or improve I'll know where to move next.
TT 1:02
1:04
1:03
1:02 (:39)
Again only marked final 50. My main focus now to keep it consistent, push off @ 3 beeps, streamlined 'perfectly' to first stroke, make it feel easy. SL actually improved on a couple initial lengths.
TT 1:00
1:02
1:01
1:00 (:38)
The "pull" to initiate a firmer hold and more pronounced kick was there but I really wanted effort to remain the same, make it just as easy as previously and felt I did. Now, I felt a tightening in my right calf which distracted me a bit a felt it kept me from marking a 'solid' :38 (coming in @ approx. :38.8). I still marked the :38 because I felt I met my intent.
Now I wanted to see if I could match time/ effort while slowing tempo, to 1.02, but this time my calf did indeed cramp and had to restart. I'm afraid this was a distraction I did not want, calf still tight, and after retrying came in @ :39, I immediately followed with a 50 @ 1.00 and came in on :38.9s, so I ended the exercise. If there was to be no 'easy' improvement I would halt and mark metrics for my next practice.
I'll continue this process but probably move to extend distances to 75s and then 100s for I feel this is the area where I'd like to focus myself for improved pace for distance. I've found it doesn't take much more than 100s practice of this focus, perhaps 150s, to improve overall pace for extended distances of 400+.
Having said that, open water practice swims of 2- 10k and "mojo" warm ups of 10- 25 minutes do help with the process, as long as overall technique play out. The choices in focus for this are endless and should continue or halt accordingly.

Cheers
Alan
Just out of curiosity Alan, how long do you rest in between each 50? I am trying to do various 25s and 50s, but at much slower tempos than you are doing and I find that I tire pretty quickly--as much as 40 beeps between sets and TT is set at 1:4. Not in yours or Andy's league, but I guess this is just a starting pont for me.

Sherry
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  #4  
Old 11-15-2013
AWP AWP is offline
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Sherry
On this particular session I rested 10-12 sec., sometimes I'll just count "yoga" breaths (2-5) and always try and keep it consistent when working on a particular something.
This helps with 'record keeping' so to speak, mentally. Similarly, I'll apply that approach towards stroke counting and other metrics.
Once you can develop a 'rhythm' of practice disciplines, it really does become easy to guide yourself towards a task, through a stubborn point or to meet a goal; small or large.
Incidentally, on that session I stayed well within my spl range which for me was the most exacting part of that practice. I wanted to call this "one of the best practices I've had" but felt it too 'personal' to make that sound helpful.
Where ever your starting point, just have a mindset of curiosity, use Terry's approach of asymmetry, slowing tempo initially then incrementally increasing tempo. This does take monk-like patience at times but well worth the benefit.
Also, this is a good place to make a jump forward. If you're comfy at say a tempo of 1.50 maybe begin your TT practice @ 1.40, no expectations, just do it and see; visualize your swim first. Slow every 25 or 50 or 100 etc. by .02 on the TT until you reach your comfy tempo. Then (put on your monk cloak) increase tempo every repeat by .01 back to where you began. What happened? Make mental notes but always try and stay in the moment as you swim each length/repeat. Don't time everything, maybe just beginning and ending points or tempos where you'd like to accomplish a certain efficiency level.
Having said all that, it is my contention to never proceed if your basic form or some big part of it is 'broken'. Fix that first, then be a monk.
Keep smiling and swimming! It really is wonderful to do.

Best
Alan

Last edited by AWP : 11-16-2013 at 06:06 AM.
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  #5  
Old 11-18-2013
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Thanks Alan for your reply and positive thinking. I especially like the shorter range of tempos--for me this is easier than doing 10 x 50 over

10 different tempos. Easier to work into a routine also.

Once again thanks for replying

Sherry
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  #6  
Old 11-19-2013
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWP View Post
I'll continue this process but probably move to extend distances to 75s and then 100s for I feel this is the area where I'd like to focus myself for improved pace for distance. I've found it doesn't take much more than 100s practice of this focus, perhaps 150s, to improve overall pace for extended distances of 400+.
Having said that, open water practice swims of 2- 10k and "mojo" warm ups of 10- 25 minutes do help with the process, as long as overall technique play out. The choices in focus for this are endless and should continue or halt accordingly.
Alan
Fantastic example of the 'pull' approach to practicing. To having speed--or any aspect of improvement--be drawn out of you, rather than chased down and beaten into submission.

I've spent a good deal of time training TI coaches with several years of experience in how to design practice sets in as organic manner as you do. You seem to do it naturally.

When will you start leading a practice group and sharing your insight with others? I'm fairly certain on Day One, you'd be the most intuitive coach on Long Island.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
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  #7  
Old 11-19-2013
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWP View Post
Where ever your starting point, just have a mindset of curiosity, . . .

never proceed if your basic form or some big part of it is 'broken'. Fix that first, then be a monk.
Keep smiling and swimming! It really is wonderful to do.
More pearls.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
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  #8  
Old 11-27-2013
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And so my focus continues on my series of "pull " sets using the TT, keeping my metrics consistent, other than tempo, including/esp. effort level, feeling "pulled" towards quicker pace while trying to hold efficiency by tuning into the three bases of efficient swimming: balance, streamlining and then propulsion.

In the first example I jumped right into 100s repeats feeling energized esp. after my tune-up (as a note I usually determine my plan for practice on what my body tells me and if I don't get my bang for my buck the experiment stops, I rewind and try again or something else).

Wednesday November 20 @ YMCA 25 yard pool
20 min. continuous tune-up swim; feel pulled towards 'quicker' tempo
TT "Pull" set
100s as:
1.15 - 1.17 - 1.19 then
1.18 - 1.17 - 1.16 - 1.15
:30 rest then
1.10 - 1.12 - 1.14 then
1.13 - 1.12 - 1.11 - 1.10
I marked no times for the entire practice. My intent was on feeling as dialed in, timely, effective (ie maintaining stroke length, staying well within my range and bettering on several rpts) and yes as wonderful as I could with each successive repeat.
I continued the next series of the same focus, by again reducing my starting point tempo by .05

Monday November 25 @ YMCA 25 yard pool
1x400 Easy IM (FR-BK-BR-FR) @ 14-16-8-13 spl
TT "Pull" set
50s as:
1.05 - 1.07 - 1.09 then
1.08 - 1.07 - 1.06 - 1.05 (:41) glimpse of :40
75s as :
1.00 - 1.02 - 1.04 then
1.03 - 1.02 - 1.01 - 1.00 (:1:01) glimpse of 1:00
75s as:
1.00 - 1.02 - 1.04 then
1.03 - 1.02 - 1.01 - 1.00 (1:00) glimpse of :59
All those glimpses and I know I can eek out some more efficiency...
50s as:
.95 - .97 - .99 then
.98 - .97 - .96 - .95 (:39)
I felt a little stuck here in the .9s initially with :39s <>, so I tried playing a bit more...
.95 - .92 - .95
... but still felt 'stuck' although my times covered the whole range of 39s (hundreths of seconds) so I knew I had a place to work.
I felt a mental wiping of the slate was in order so
1x100 Easy IM then
I thought to tune the TT to just under .90 @ .89 and...
... a rather effortless :37, good place to stop and wrap up with
1x100 E-IM

Judging by the marked times here and overall perceived effort, I can determine what my pace for 100s, at the same tempo range, 'should' be on my next go, taking into account all other factors remain; 3 beep push off, turns, bi-lateral breathing.
Now, it will take a considerable amount of practice @ these tempos to make them even close to sustainable over much greater distances, but the ground work has been laid. If I continue in this range, and even narrower, just like practicing lower spls, then when the time comes to take off the "training" wheels I'm likely assured my overall base pace (and then some) will have improved and be sustainable.
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  #9  
Old 12-16-2013
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWP View Post
Also, this is a good place to make a jump forward. If you're comfy at say a tempo of 1.50 maybe begin your TT practice @ 1.40, no expectations, just do it and see; visualize your swim first. Slow every 25 or 50 or 100 etc. by .02 on the TT until you reach your comfy tempo. Then (put on your monk cloak) increase tempo every repeat by .01 back to where you began. What happened? Make mental notes but always try and stay in the moment as you swim each length/repeat. Don't time everything, maybe just beginning and ending points or tempos where you'd like to accomplish a certain efficiency level.
Having said all that, it is my contention to never proceed if your basic form or some big part of it is 'broken'. Fix that first, then be a monk.
Keep smiling and swimming! It really is wonderful to do
.

Best
Alan
Have read your comments several times and they make sense. I had posted a video and Andy pointed out (correctly) that instead of rotating, I was rolling. This is causing a shorter dps for me. So, I will take your advice (to fix that first) and make rotation a focal point on my warm ups and try to incorporate in my free style. Thanks for your suggestions.

Sherry
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  #10  
Old 12-16-2013
AWP AWP is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jenson1a View Post
I had posted a video and Andy pointed out (correctly) that instead of rotating, I was rolling. This is causing a shorter dps for me.

Sherry

Sherry
I'm not quite sure what you both mean here.
If I could suggest other things to hone:

*neutral head position/relaxed, looking down
*extension, especially the lead arm
*spearing depth/balance
**timing, flick-to-spear**

Other nuances come next. Use the TT @ moderate tempos (not too slowly) if you wish to balance your stroking cycles while focused on these.
Have fun and keep us up.

Best
Alan
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