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  #1  
Old 11-28-2014
Polish TI fan Polish TI fan is offline
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Polish TI fan
Default TI freestyle - details that seem to have changed in recent years

Hello to everyone in TI World,

I have been into TI freestyle since August this year. I have learnt mainly from you tube films and also from Terry's book. I currently swim at around 14-15 SPL (I'm 187cm tall). I did manage to swim at 10-11 SPL for some time, but it changed after I attended a 2-day TI workshop here in Poland, and my approach has slightly changed.

A few general queries have emerged after the workshop, and I thought it would be worth asking here for your feedback and to see what others know/think, what your experiences are.

Here are the points:

1. Is too low a SPL a bad thing? It was said so in the workshop. I did not feel I was exerting myself too much when I swam at 10-11 SPL (the other thing though is, that since my movements and mental approach changed after the workshop, I am unable now to get down to 11 SPL...)

2. Is there an up-to-date table of optimum SPL's vs. persons height? What should mine be (187cm)?

3. We were taught at the workshop that we should kick left foot while we extend left palm-hand under the water, not cross side, as I have learnt from you tube clips (left foor/right hand and vice versa). The coach said it did not matter, it was just easier for beginners to control one side movements. Would you agree? At this stage I feel more comfortable kicking cross-side. Does it affect efficiency of a stroke?

4. When we move a hand from recovery to the entry position (until a palm enters water just in front of ear) should we keep it in almost vertical position (as I think it shows on the classic Shinji's video), or should the angle between the arm and the forearm be around 60 degrees (equall sides triangle), as we were taught? Is one of these a bad thing, or the both are correct?

5. Finally, the Coach was saying, that the method has evolved and what was correct a few years ago might have or actually have changed. Is there a lot that has changed then...? The available DVD's are dated 2007-2008. I hope they are still best advice ones?

I will be gratefull for yout thoughts. Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 11-28-2014
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Hi Polish TI Fan:

Great questions and happy to hear you've taken a workshop. I'll address each of your questions below:

1. I wouldn't think of SPL as low or high, but the right SPL for each swimmer. Aiming for the lowest possible SPL is not the goal, but often interpreted as such. It's really about ideal stroke length (SL) given your height and skill level; SPL is used to determine stroke length (SL = Dist/SPL). SL is how far you move forward on each stroke and ideally should be between 50%-70% of your height. Assuming you're swimming 25m pool and 5m push, 20m of actual stroking -- at 11 SPL, SL is 181.8cm. Your height is 187cm means you are moving forward 97% of your height on each stroke. Certainly too low to sustain, but the 11 SPL is probably coming with errors, pausing recovery hand at hip to achieve longer SL (a no-no), excessive kick, extra long wall push - or some combination of the above.

2. Same as noted in #1. SL 50%-70% of height. Given your height, SPL 16-18 (stroking 20m) puts you between 67% (at 16 SPL) and 59% (at 18 SPL) respectively, a good range for you to be in.

3. I suspect coach was emphasizing the timing up front which is where swimmers need to start. If kick timing is integrated too soon, everything is thrown off, so don't worry too much. The diagonal timing will happen more naturally once balance and core stability have been acquired.

4. Yes, recovery arm should look more equilateral triangle shape from front or back view. Shinji's video he swims closer to a stacked position (more rotation), recovery arm closer to vertical. Since then we (and Shinji too) have moved to less rotation in both drill and whole-stroke which provide a more stable platform.

5. That's the beauty of TI, the process continues to evolve and improve upon, "Coaching Kaizen". But as noted in #4, the main thing that has changed since 2006 or so has been moving to less rotation.

Stuart
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Old 12-01-2014
Polish TI fan Polish TI fan is offline
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Polish TI fan
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Stuart,

Thank you. You have clarified a lot, all is very important to me.

I will really focus now on making my swim more relax, to work on streamline-balance-propulsion and make it all less effort and the movements better/cleaner.

I cannot express how happy swimmer I've become since switching from the traditional methods to TI!

Many thanks.
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Old 12-01-2014
angelinamike angelinamike is offline
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Yes, you are right that recovery arm should look more equilateral triangle shape from front or back view. Shinji's video he swims closer to a stacked position (more rotation), recovery arm closer to vertical. Since then we (and Shinji too) have moved to less rotation in both drill and whole-stroke which provide a more stable platform.
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Old 12-02-2014
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polish TI fan View Post
Stuart,

Thank you. You have clarified a lot, all is very important to me.

I will really focus now on making my swim more relax, to work on streamline-balance-propulsion and make it all less effort and the movements better/cleaner.

I cannot express how happy swimmer I've become since switching from the traditional methods to TI!

Many thanks.
You are welcome, and glad it helped. Great to hear you are a happy swimmer! No more frowns in the pool :-) Swimming is most engaging both mentally and physically -- and just plain FUNNN

Enjoy the journey!

Stuart
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