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  #1  
Old 01-21-2018
bujanglokal
 
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Default Help me to speed up a little bit

Here.are.two latest videos of mine:

Over the water shot:
https://youtu.be/04Xg1b088qc

Underwater shot, from two weeks before above video was shot, different pool, but I think my form didn't change much:
https://youtu.be/ediraTV11O4

I just want to be bit faster within the same relaxed (not speeding it up) mode, like just by getting more.propulsion from feet, better catch and press, better streamline, etc. From those 2 videos above, what do you think could be improved or what are the most obvious.mistakes.that I still made?

Thanks very much,

BL
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  #2  
Old 01-21-2018
Streak Streak is offline
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Many experts here who I am sure will comment.
What I am seeing is that your hips are a little low in the water possibly caused by you looking more forward than down.
Picture that laser beam coming out the top of your head pointing towards the opposite wall.
I also breathe every second stroke to my right so really try to concentrate on doing the right thing whenever I am not breathing!
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  #3  
Old 01-21-2018
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
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Hello BL,

you're swimming a very relaxed stroke, aligned in a wishable tube and your kick doesn't disturb your streamline. Sure you put much good work into!

As Joel wrote, looking strictly down and FP on weightless head will help you to tune your "tube" even a little more parallel to surface. In your overwater-shot it seems to have a little angle in your spine-leg and a little hollow back. both can be a follow up from your tensed neck.and/or from your "wish" to reach as much forward as possilbe. Slip into the mailslot just in front of your head and spear forward in the water initiated from your core.

Underwater-shot shows that you may tune your spear a little more "catch-wise". While reaching over the imagined Pilates-ball your fingers should be lowest then wrist, then elbow, then shoulder all relaxed... and then your arm will flow/drift forceless into a better catch not initiated by your elbow (as shown in your video). It looks to me as if you let work your arm/hand a little bit alone without connection to your core. Let your core initiate and help your catch and press, Try to hold elbow and hand on the same line (perpendicular to spine) without leading (and slipping) elbow. With connection to core and rotation it will help you or do most of the work. Also your kick can be a little more hip-initiated, not only relaxed and straightened knee . This is also a help for more core-connection over all. But don't kick larger. Your kick already is well in your "tube".

Hope it will be of some help for your FPs. Ejoy your good work!

Best regards,
Werner
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  #4  
Old 01-21-2018
bujanglokal
 
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Thanks Streak and Werner, will focus on the points you've mentioned to improve my swimming.

BL
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  #5  
Old 01-21-2018
sclim sclim is offline
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My 2 c worth from an experienced beginner that has practiced for what seems like forever! As Werner says in his first paragraph, you have a lot of things right, some of which I don't always manage to keep on doing right myself.

As Werner mentioned in the catch and hold:

"Try to hold elbow and hand on the same line (perpendicular to spine) without leading (and slipping) elbow."

The fact that you tend to lead with your elbow during the hold (or the pull, if you think of that phase as a pull) and allow water to slip past that elbow-leading arm (or is it the leading elbow slipping past the water?), suggests that you haven't yet got the natural instinct to rotate your arm at the shoulder so that the elbow rotates outwards and as high as it can get. This actually is revealed even earlier, during the spear phase.

The early (even some recent!) videos of my own swimming progression look similar, and I got to calling it the "Ancient Egyptian" look. The paintings found in Ancient Egyptian tomb had a very characteristic look, with the faces pictured in profile and the arms often arranged in an odd pose with the upper arms obliquely angled, the forearms horizontal and the elbows slightly bent and pointing downwards. Your extended spearing arm looks the same, as did mine, and still does when I get tired.

If you merely fully extend the elbow, the arm will straighten out, but the elbow will still be pointing downwards. However, if you rotate the arm at the shoulder (internal rotation, i.e. so that the inside surface of the arm rolls downwards and the outside surface rolls upwards), first your elbow point will rotate outwards, and with a little more rotation, even facing a little upwards (with the full arm still angled slightly downwards TI style). This is the limit of rotation that I can achieve in full spear position, but it makes for a nice glide, and it sets you up for an easy transition into an efficient catch, with further internal rotation into as high an elbow as you can comfortably achieve.

This feeling of internal rotation at the shoulder can also be experienced even earlier, during the recovery, when the elbow is deviated outwards as it exits the water (rather than pulling straight up), leading the hand (rather than vice versa) in the forward arc just above the water, until it passes the shoulder level, at which point the hand swings ahead of the elbow prior to the mail-slot entry.

Last edited by sclim : 01-21-2018 at 09:05 PM.
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  #6  
Old 01-22-2018
bujanglokal
 
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Thanks sclim.
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  #7  
Old 01-22-2018
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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One visualization that helps me get a good catch and press:

Imagine you are standing in front of a shelf or ledge that is just above your head.

Reach your arm straight up and then bend your elbow to place the palm of your hand flat on the imaginary shelf. Your upper arm (shoulder to elbow) should still be pretty much vertical. Your forearm (elbow to fingertips) should be horizontal, with the palm of your hand on the imaginary shelf.

Now press down on the shelf as if the shelf is on rails and can slide down the wall as you press on it. To do this pressing motion, keep your forearm horizontal. The only thing you should move is your upper arm, which slowly becomes more and more horizontal (and then even moves past horizontal) as you press the shelf down and make it slide down the rails. The forearm remains horizontal and gets moved along with the upper arm, keeping the same L shape all the way through the pressing motion.

This is the exact motion that you want in swimming for the catch and press. You should NOT pull with the arms. Instead, the large muscles of the torso (lats, etc.) are engaged to move the entire L-shaped arm (forearm and upper arm) together. The arm can stay relaxed as it is only being moved.

It helps to make the pressing motion SLOWLY and steadily. Pay lots of attention to how the water feels on your hand, forearm, and elbow as you press. If you feel your arm slipping or moving QUICKLY through the water, slow down. Your goal is to move your hand back no faster than your body is moving forward.

Good luck!
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Last edited by Tom Pamperin : 01-22-2018 at 08:37 PM.
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  #8  
Old 01-22-2018
bujanglokal
 
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Thanks Tom.
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  #9  
Old 01-31-2018
CoachBillGreentree CoachBillGreentree is offline
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Watching the above water video one thing I noticed is you're a bit off from that triangle we're after during the recovery. You recovering arms are a bit flat. A visualization I've found that often helps (without carrying it too far anyway) is to think of throwing your recovering elbow to your lead hand. That should help get the arm into a better position and have your hand entry be a bit steeper.

As for the underwater, I agree with the comments above, try seeing if bringing your lead hand a bit deeper during the entry will help keeping the legs and hips up. Ideally the hand would be no deeper than your hips but everyone is a bit different.

Honestly though, you are smooth and relaxed. You're not far off where you want to be. Good luck.

Aloha
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  #10  
Old 02-01-2018
bujanglokal
 
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Thanks Coach Bill.
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