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  #11  
Old 02-12-2009
AWP AWP is offline
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Spot on.
The desired 'tone' for your core can be acquired with these drill practices: Core Balance (fish), Skating and Spear Switch (w/a brief pause before spearing).
When focusing on hip rotation, take note to try and keep your legs 'quiet'; long and supple but quiet.
I've recently discovered that 'neglect' in focus on this aspect has led to my legs developing a mind of thier own, really just working a bit too much.
Keep us up.
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  #12  
Old 03-07-2009
khoslaam khoslaam is offline
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Finally have a video on YouTube. My shoulder discomfort is better, the video was taken before I discovered my issue with the shoulder. It looks like when I bring my left shoulder up to spear I was not keeping it closer to my body. For some reason this shoulder is not as flexible as my right shoulder (maybe because I am right handed :)). Anyhow please provide me with some comments on my form and what I can do to improve it. Thanks.

p.s. Youtube link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJVCOizUWis
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  #13  
Old 03-08-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by khoslaam View Post
At the end of the video, it seems that your left arm could enter a little wider. It seems like the left arm is shooting for the centre rather than ahead of the shoulder.
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  #14  
Old 03-08-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Here's what I see ,It seems you may need to have more patient hands and maybe a little more stroke length. On the first lap it seems that when you breathe to the left your arm does not lengthen your body by being patient and staying out front , instead it seems to claw down and you twist your body a little too much .You may need to work a little on balance and not turn your head to look back too much but instead roll to the air and look a little more to the side and up. Coming along nicely.

Dave
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  #15  
Old 03-08-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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I took a screenshot that shows how the left arm is might be opposing forward movement. The arm seems to be at an extreme angle at entry and throughout the extension.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg left_arm_entry.jpg (49.5 KB, 29 views)
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  #16  
Old 03-09-2009
mjm mjm is offline
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Default Wide tracks

Kho:

You have got a nice, relaxed stroke. However, you are taking about 24 strokes for 25 meters or yards. When you breathe--apparently always to your left side--your right arm crosses over the mid-line of your torso. Try wide tracks, especially get that right hand to the outside of your right shoulder when you breathe.

You extend your arm during the stroke but your catch starts late, almost under your shoulder, and you get very little "traction" because your arms are a little out of synch.

You are swimming "all arms". You are not engaging the large muscles of the back--the latissimus dorsi (lats) and the trapezoids (traps). What to do? Instead of spearing just your right arm (for example) forward, try spearing your whole shoulder and right half of your back.

Think of paddling a canoe. Would you use just your arms to paddle? Or would you use your entire shoulder and back muscles to put the most power into the stroke? If you had a single paddle that had an oar at each end you could not start the left stroke until the right was finished. That would be correct synchronization. Check out A. Popov:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIzBa...next=1&index=1

Here he uses about 31 strokes to swim 50 meters in under 22 seconds.
Golf score = 53.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DUOl-...eature=related

--mjm
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  #17  
Old 03-09-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjm View Post
You are swimming "all arms". You are not engaging the large muscles of the back--the latissimus dorsi (lats) and the trapezoids (traps). What to do? Instead of spearing just your right arm (for example) forward, try spearing your whole shoulder and right half of your back.

Think of paddling a canoe. Would you use just your arms to paddle? Or would you use your entire shoulder and back muscles to put the most power into the stroke? If you had a single paddle that had an oar at each end you could not start the left stroke until the right was finished. That would be correct synchronization. Check out A. Popov:
Would it be equally valid to think of pulling the shoulder back? (I guess it depends on your emphasis; either spearing or pulling.)

I've seen the drill with a pole or rope in which one performs a rowing/stroking action. Might be something to try mindfully.

In breaststroke, I've been playing with dropping my shoulders on the in-sweep. Less often I play with actively moving my shoulder back in the crawl. It seems that to move one shoulder in one direction, the opposite shoulder must move in the opposite direction or tension increases.

Laughlin-sensei does a shoulder movement in the first drill in the Better Fly DVD. It seems deceptively simple. Something worth trying.

More recently, I've been testing out dropping my shoulder blades to put my arms in the streamline position. Rhoda and yoga (nice rhyme?) got me thinking about that one. My yoga book states the following: "Shift your biceps outward in 'Raised Mountain' to help straighten your raised arms, and to drop your shoulders away from your ears." And Rhoda mentioned the shoulder blades. Putting the ideas together helps me, although I still lack flexibility so I feel resistance from various parts of my body.

Anyway, I can definitely feel the difference when I get my body engaged in the strokes. The concept of anchoring helps with that.

Last edited by shuumai : 03-09-2009 at 05:51 PM.
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  #18  
Old 03-09-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shuumai View Post
Laughlin-sensei does a shoulder movement in the first drill in the Better Fly DVD. It seems deceptively simple. Something worth trying.
Giving the GIF of Terry:

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  #19  
Old 03-10-2009
madvet madvet is offline
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These are terms used in more "traditional" coaching but I think they are valid here:

Your hands cross over underneath your body.

It looks like you have dropped elbows -- visually it looks like a cat scooping a mouse towards your mouth. There is a hesitation in your catch, I think that is when your elbow drops.

You accelerate the stroke in the later part of the pull -- if you have tension caused by the dropped elbow and crossunder, then that is going to cause tension as you pull, and therefore hurt your muscles. Slow this part of the stroke down -- when you get effective pull when you learn how not to drop your elbow, it will slow down by itself, but for now, slow the pull down on purpose.
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Last edited by madvet : 03-10-2009 at 04:40 PM.
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