Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 01-18-2010
dshen dshen is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 200
dshen
Default

I thought I'd just say that any hard activity can cause inflexibility including swimming. If you watch bodybuilding competitions, there are many who are doing routines that involve splits. If weight training were to cause inflexibility in all cases, then how would this be possible?

I think the problem is that you're working muscles hard, and then you're not stretching them out afterwards. Think about working with weights around your whole body. How many people take the time to completely stretch out their whole body? Some body parts are dang hard to stretch! So we blow it off and then weight training, not our own time constraints, takes the blame.

If you swim hard, your shoulder/arm/chest muscles can get very tight, get restricted, and start shortening if you don't rest and stretch them. But on the flip side, weight training has shown to strengthen muscles related to any physical activity, stabilize joints better, and improve performance. I think thus, the issue is whether or not you let the muscles shorten/tighten/become inflexible after training or not.

Yoga is great for the flexibility. I think of it as practicing "flexible strength" where you are put in stretched positions but forced to hold those positions, which requires strength but in a stretched position. But you can get sore/tight from too much yoga too.

Resistance stretching is also great, and worked great for Dara Torres at the Olympics...
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-18-2010
shuumai shuumai is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,077
shuumai
Send a message via Skype™ to shuumai
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dshen View Post
If you swim hard, your shoulder/arm/chest muscles can get very tight, get restricted, and start shortening if you don't rest and stretch them.
What if you end with a cool-down with long, relaxed strokes? I guess some stretching would still be important. Going straight for the cold locker room might not help matters.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-18-2010
dshen dshen is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Palo Alto, CA
Posts: 200
dshen
Default

Cooling down of course helps. However, if you have worked your muscles to a certain point of tiredness, which is generally what you want to do to improve, then it is possible that over time your body will tend towards tightness if you do not do something to address this.

Time helps but who wants to take 2-3 days to recover completely? ART and Graston are really great for releasing tight muscles. Some forms of massage can too. Stretching after swimming does help a lot, as does stretching every day.

As we train, we damage the muscles. The muscle repairs and gets stronger; this is a natural process. the bummer is that this natural process can also cause laying down of scar tissue that cause restrictions in the muscles. And the funny thing is, activity with the muscles has a natural tendency to break down this scar tissue and the restrictions. However, you might exceed the body's ability to break down scar tissue while it is laying down and theoretically getting stronger and thus introduce inflexibility which could inevitably lead to injury and downtime.

I go to ART/Graston every week. It's great for breaking down restrictions in the muscles and makes them functional again.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.