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  #1  
Old 07-23-2015
mgl2015 mgl2015 is offline
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mgl2015
Default Can't understand weight shift. Can somebody visually explain, if possible?

I bought Total Immersion Self couch dvd. Sometimes the word “weight shift” puzzles me. Can somebody explain it? Is it saying: weight shifts from navel area to the direction of the head when one arm lunges ahead? (Along body height?)

Or is it from right to left vice versa, when body rolls? If so, how left to right and vice versa weight shift (along body width) helps forward motion? See image. Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 07-23-2015
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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The weight shift is back and forth between your left side and your right side. It's similar to the weight shift you experience when you're doing ice skating or roller skating (which is why we use the term "skate position" for one of our drills). The weight of your recovering arm helps to drive the rotation of your core body about the axis of your spine. And that, in turn, helps to drive your arm stroke.


Bob
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  #3  
Old 07-23-2015
Tom Pamperin Tom Pamperin is offline
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Tom Pamperin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
The weight shift is back and forth between your left side and your right side. It's similar to the weight shift you experience when you're doing ice skating or roller skating (which is why we use the term "skate position" for one of our drills). The weight of your recovering arm helps to drive the rotation of your core body about the axis of your spine. And that, in turn, helps to drive your arm stroke.


Bob
I agree that the TI weight shift feels similar to the motion of skating (on cross country skis for me). Keeping your elbow high on recovery lets gravity help more as you spear your arm.
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  #4  
Old 07-23-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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You are not the only one that is asking this question.
Go to page 5 to the thread
How does weight shift cause propulsion? (almost 10,000 views!!)

You wont find a good answer there either.

This coach does a pretty good attempt to explain it @ 16-22 min
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7Jmrfi9Y0g

Maybe you also like this dryland comparable propulsive mechanism.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R93RRyW8484
The robot legs are like the arms in freestyle. The weight is the upside weight during the roll.
Get the whole mechanism working in the right rhythm and you are in fishland.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 07-23-2015 at 09:33 PM.
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  #5  
Old 07-24-2015
Lutz99 Lutz99 is offline
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What I learned is that swimming with weight shift will only work when the swimmer is balanced, head and spine are aligned and the neck is relaxed, otherwise you’ll have a hard time. I recommend to practice superman glide starting to slightly shift the weight from hip to hip. Swim with focus afterwards. It takes time…
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  #6  
Old 07-24-2015
szero szero is offline
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hi,
After reading Bob's comment the other day I had my first wow-experience in ti today. I had the feeling of swimming effortless and could have swam on forever :)
What helped me was concentrating on the weight of my recovering arm and watching the effect of it on my whole body. There is no need to force the weight shift actively - it just happens automatically and with that the right timing of the kick and pull. I only had to connect my arm to my whole body.
I guess I entered a flow-state today.
Perhaps this helps.

Btw I am a keen and frequent forum user - but passive most of the time.
I think it's time to say a big thank you to all of you for your wise and helpful comments. I really like your community - you're welcoming, helpful and without any offences - hard to find that on any other forum on the internet!!!
Cheers and all the best,
Szero
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  #7  
Old 07-24-2015
szero szero is offline
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szero
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what I forgot because I was logged out after writing my post and had to rewrite it:
I realized (of course I read it a hundretimes before but it didn't find the way to my mind) that recovering not only means to move your arm forward (and pull with your other arm at the right moment) but connect your body to it and let the weight of it sink your hip - it really felt like skating and moving forward without any strength.
I hope that's a bit more precise...
Szero
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  #8  
Old 07-24-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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szero, can you lay in the water balanced, stick your arm in the air in recovery style and see how much time it takes to let the weight of the arm rotate the body?
If you use this time, you can very roughly calculate the strokerate at which the armweight alone can rotate the body.
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  #9  
Old 07-26-2015
szero szero is offline
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Sorry zenturtle,
but I couldn't make sense of your post. Is there a video for this?
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  #10  
Old 07-26-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Imagine your body being a floating treelog.
Suddenly the treelog grows a human arm thats sticking up under say 45 degrees angle with the water surface.
How long does it take to let the weight of the arm rotate the treelog until the arm hits the water,taking the treelog along rotation it 45 degrees?
Just try it.

In my view the above water arm weight is only helping rotation for a roughly 25%, If you recover close to the centerline over the body possibly even less.
At very low strokerates the weight has a longer time to act on the body, so its rotational helping part could be higher.
Just look at when Shinji really starts to roll to the other side.
Arm recovery starts- no roll
halfway recovery -no roll
3/4 trhrough recovery-no roll
All the time the weight of the arm is pulling the high side down with no effect.
Arm almost enters water- finally the roll starts.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BJCxP6RcjE
He uses the kick, the underwater pull (pulling towards the centerline or palm pitched toward the center during the pull), and some weight of the arm, craftfully timing and connecting them through the core.
And possibly some magical roll power where Charles is specialized in.
He can roll without kick, without an arm weight, and without an armpull.
Hopefully he isnt breaking the axis while doing this.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 07-26-2015 at 02:31 PM.
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