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  #1  
Old 09-17-2012
kalinma kalinma is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
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kalinma
Default Different Pool

OK, I just had a weird experience in the pool today. I hadn't gone swimming in almost two weeks because my usual pool is closed for almost all of September for annual maintenance. Couldn't stand not being in the water anymore, so today I took the subway more than an hour to another pool that has a cheap lap swim. Somehow, I felt more bouyant in this pool than in my usual one. That really doesn't seem possible, but that's what I felt. Unless they use salt water in this pool, I can't imagine how anything, such as a little more or a little less chlorine, or a few degrees difference in temperature, could possibly make a noticeable difference in the density (and thus bouyancy) of the water. Has anyone else ever felt more bouyant in a different pool?

Last edited by kalinma : 09-17-2012 at 01:13 AM. Reason: grammar
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  #2  
Old 09-17-2012
tomoy tomoy is offline
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Yeah. My guess is you put your finger on it, and its salt-level was higher. I go between three pools regularly, and they all taste different. I'm pretty sure that some are more salty and others are more chlorine-ie.
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  #3  
Old 09-17-2012
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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Hmmm, even so (salt), and though it is not impossible that it does make a noticeable difference (obviously, noticeable being the keyword here), there's another possibility.

When you learn swimming the right way (I leave up to the reader the definition of *the right way*), sometimes moving away from aquatic environment for a whilst is a good thing. You get back with a slight different point of view every time.

Worst thing to do when you go back to swimming is hurrying up, whatever the reason. It's a sin. Just enjoy noticing that you're just a better swimmer now. You can certainly float just as well in any pool probably. Cause though there could be a slight difference, it's a gap that's not impossible to close by improving your own balance.

A slightly better relaxed state, ankles are being floppier, every single little kick (no more effort than usual) does elevate the lower body, thus giving you the impression that you float better. Better relaxed state the whole body would translate into the same effect. Several thing can improve buoyancy, not just salt in some pool ;-)

And next time your kept off water environment, don't worry anymore. Just enjoy connecting back with a old friend, and more importantly, if you feel better you've ever felt, believe this! It may as well be real. You may simply feeling these important things, relaxation, body control from a new angle. This is awesome!

Last edited by CharlesCouturier : 09-17-2012 at 04:18 AM.
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  #4  
Old 09-17-2012
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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Location: Rio, Wisconsin
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westyswoods
Default Saline vs Chlorine

My swims are in both saline and choline pools. Yes I do notice a difference, I've also been told that it is all in my head because the saline concentration is so slight.

I will leave that debate to the experts, all I know is what I feel. Greater buoyancy is felt in the saline pool.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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  #5  
Old 09-20-2012
Danny Danny is offline
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I second Westyswoods opinions. About 4 times a year I swim at a beautiful facility that uses salt instead of chlorine. I definitely feel more buoyant. At first I thought it might be a one time thing, but the experience seems to be very repeatable. Now, one might conjecture that this pool is so nice that my mood is better and that's what does it. I have thought about this too, but, in the end, I can't get away from the fact that I just feel more buoyant in this pool. I think it's the salt. Questions: How much does the density of water change with salt content? How close to the density of people is the density of water? If we knew the answers to these questions, it might help clarify all of this.
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  #6  
Old 09-20-2012
Danny Danny is offline
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I just looked up "seawater" in Wikipedia and found that it is about 2.5% heavier than fresh water. So, for the sake of argument, let's say that a swimmer of 70 kg has about the density of fresh water. That means that this swimmer will neither sink nor float to the surface in fresh water. Instead, he/she will remain suspended in the water, at whatever position she finds herself. If this swimmer now goes into saltwater, he can support an excess weight of 2.5% of 70 kg or about 1.75 kg (almost 4 lbs) above the surface. If a swimming pool uses much less salt than seawater, than this 4 lbs might be cut down to about 1 or 2 lbs. How might you notice this? Well, your head probably won't sink as fast, for one thing.

Don't know if this helps anyone else, but I feel like it helps me to think about it.
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