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  #1  
Old 01-10-2016
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Default Slow it Down - Time bending

Today I extended my recent warm up of 400m @ 400m pace with 20s rest between each 100 (for me 1:40 off 2:00) to 800m

I was focused on making this pace feel more and more relaxed.

During the 5th or 6th repeat I suddenly decided to 'use the force' and concentrate on slowing down the tempo trainer with mind skills.

This sounds weird but it actually works. The heart slowed down and the TT pace felt more laboured, or in other words I had more time to go through the stroke motions.

I'm guessing what happens is you subconsciously get through the stroke quicker and have a longer glide and relaxation part of the stroke cycle.

Once I had this as a focus holding a strict 17SPL became a given.

I'd love some others to try this time bending technique and let me know the results.
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  #2  
Old 01-10-2016
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Hi Andy,

I'm not sure what you mean by 'time bending' -- slower tempo? What is your tempo and spl when you swim 100 repeats at 1:30 on 2's and what is tempo and spl when you swim 1:40 on 2's?

Stuart
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Old 01-11-2016
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Hi Stuart,

I use 'time bending' as a way of forcing relaxation in the stroke.

If you're swimming a challenging repeat of say 100's then any given tempo setting can feel relaxed and leisurely on the first repeat but more pressured on length 4.

I'm suggesting that instead of trying to keep up with the beat, the swimmer focuses on the beat and mentally tries to slow the beat down and allow the stroke process to take place

Whilst we can't physically alter a tempo of 60 beats per minute we can put the beat ahead of the stroke in the thought process which has the effect of feeling like it is slowing down?????
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Old 01-11-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
Hi Stuart,

I use 'time bending' as a way of forcing relaxation in the stroke.

If you're swimming a challenging repeat of say 100's then any given tempo setting can feel relaxed and leisurely on the first repeat but more pressured on length 4.

I'm suggesting that instead of trying to keep up with the beat, the swimmer focuses on the beat and mentally tries to slow the beat down and allow the stroke process to take place

Whilst we can't physically alter a tempo of 60 beats per minute we can put the beat ahead of the stroke in the thought process which has the effect of feeling like it is slowing down?????
Hi Andy,

I'm still not quite not quite with you yet. Are you saying to swim with TT set at some value, but not swimming on that tempo, but just behind it (slower)?

Regarding swimming challenging 100's with the first length feeling relaxed but not on the last length. My question is why or what's happening between the first length and the last length that's causing the increase in difficulty? Unless you are talking about doing 20 challenging 100's and the last 500 felt a bit more difficult to hold than the first 500.

You noted you held 17spl on longer glide focus. Did you hold 17spl at both 1:30 and 1:40 x 100m paces? That would be tempos of appx 1.05 and 1.2 respectively (or 57spm and 50spm respectively). Which turnover rate could you sustain consistently for say 20x100's where each length of a 100 felt about the same effort?

Stuart
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Old 01-11-2016
sclim sclim is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post

Whilst we can't physically alter a tempo of 60 beats per minute we can put the beat ahead of the stroke in the thought process which has the effect of feeling like it is slowing down?????
It's just a mental trick you've devised, to induce a sense of relaxation while actually keeping to the same real time tempo, right?
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  #6  
Old 01-12-2016
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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It's just a mental trick you've devised, to induce a sense of relaxation while actually keeping to the same real time tempo, right?
Exactly - I don't actually have time bending skills.

I think it encourages the swimmer to get the stroke done on the beep rather than during the time interval between one beep and another if that makes sense.

Oomph at the front of the stroke
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Old 01-12-2016
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Hi Andy,

Just trying to create some context around your images that's all. So if I understand this right, you are finishing or completing your stroke on the beep from the tempo - correct? And if so, then where is this done or completed? In front, at the hip, entry, or? What finish (or completion) made you the most relaxed in the water?

Stuart
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Old 01-12-2016
sclim sclim is offline
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Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
Exactly - I don't actually have time bending skills.
Oh, rats. I was hoping you could give me the co-ordinates to the worm-hole in the universe so I could take a short cut, bypassing the curved time-space continuum. Back to more swim drills, I guess.
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Old 01-12-2016
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Maybe you can imagine every beep of the the metronome to be the exact moment jist before impact of your latest car/motor/.bike crash.
I had quite some crashes and I almost enjoyed those moments because the spike in adrnnalin level or whatever made the time expand like it was under a magnifying glass making fractions of a seconds feel like eternity.
Even if the situation wasnt under control, it seemed under control.
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Old 01-13-2016
Danny Danny is offline
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Originally Posted by Zenturtle View Post
Maybe you can imagine every beep of the the metronome to be the exact moment jist before impact of your latest car/motor/.bike crash.
I had quite some crashes and I almost enjoyed those moments because the spike in adrnnalin level or whatever made the time expand like it was under a magnifying glass making fractions of a seconds feel like eternity.
Even if the situation wasnt under control, it seemed under control.
I once had the same experience in a skiing accident. While I was flying through the air, I was deciding how to land on my shoulder to minimize the impact. I had plenty of time to make the choice, but I guess I must have made the wrong choice (there may not have been a right one.) I wound up breaking a bone in my shoulder.
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