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  #1  
Old 08-26-2015
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Default USA age group motivational times

A great read. Some of the USA time standards for different events and courses.

I appear to be the same standard as the 65percentile (BB min) of 10years and under competitive swimmers.

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/...imes-Top16.pdf

explanation of the columns

http://www.teamaquatics.net/stteam/U...0explained.htm
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  #2  
Old 08-26-2015
s.sciame s.sciame is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
A great read. Some of the USA time standards for different events and courses.

I appear to be the same standard as the 65percentile (BB min) of 10years and under competitive swimmers.

http://www.usaswimming.org/_Rainbow/...imes-Top16.pdf

explanation of the columns

http://www.teamaquatics.net/stteam/U...0explained.htm
Looking at their ages and times over different distances, it's interesting to note how they build speed first and endurance second.

As an adult learner I used to think that I could neglect building speed and go straight to build endurance (given some decent technique in place of course, and continuing with technical refinements while training endurance), but I'm realizing that it does not really work like this, or it works up to a point.

By the way Andy, I remember you were training speed over short distances last winter, with the intention to build aerobic fitness just before summer. Did it work? How much did you improve? I ask because I'm transitioning from threshold training to USRPT.

Regards,
Salvo
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  #3  
Old 08-26-2015
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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It is a very common experience to be passed by a tiny kid swimming about twice as fast. One has to remember that in addition to being young and full of energy they also have a very low drag profile. That's my excuse anyway. ;-)
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Old 08-26-2015
descending descending is offline
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[quote=s.sciame;54791]
As an adult learner I used to think that I could neglect building speed and go straight to build endurance (given some decent technique in place of course, and continuing with technical refinements while training endurance), but I'm realizing that it does not really work like this, or it works up to a point.
/QUOTE]

This is how competitive swim development works in the U.S. Everyone swims fast. They way they find out who can be a distance entrant is to build the speed first and then test their endurance after the speed is there. The chances of swimmers accidentally stumbling on the hard to discover refinements it takes to swim very fast by coming from the slow endurance end are much less likely than ingraining fast technique in everyone and then seeing who can keep it going longer. The 'LSD' or long slow distance mantras of 30 years ago don't pan out for fast swimming.
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Old 08-26-2015
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hi descending

I think the speed first approach is also the norm in Britain and most likely Australia, from what I have read, and very possibly in other European countries. It obviously works to a large extent, or the material would not be there for the Olympic squads and the like.

The question is whether it is at all suitable for adult onset learners or people like myself who learnt to swim as a young person (aged twelve in my case, which would be a very late start by today's standards) and swam quite a lot as a youngster but never in a swimming club and with virtually no competitive background.

I would like to add a little speed before entering the great pool in the sky but I realise that perhaps learning to swim gracefully is a more sensible approach. Who wants to be sensible, though?
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Old 08-26-2015
descending descending is offline
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Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
Hi descending

I think the speed first approach is also the norm in Britain and most likely Australia, from what I have read, and very possibly in other European countries. It obviously works to a large extent, or the material would not be there for the Olympic squads and the like.

The question is whether it is at all suitable for adult onset learners or people like myself who learnt to swim as a young person (aged twelve in my case, which would be a very late start by today's standards) and swam quite a lot as a youngster but never in a swimming club and with virtually no competitive background.

I would like to add a little speed before entering the great pool in the sky but I realise that perhaps learning to swim gracefully is a more sensible approach. Who wants to be sensible, though?
Ultimately that's a decision for you alone depending on goals. All I can say is I have watched hundreds and hundreds of adult onset swimmers join Masters squads with this approach and go on to compete at very high levels over the years.

You use the phrase 'sensible approach'. Can you expound on that a little I'm not sure I follow. The only difference I'm talking about b/t low effort aerobic levels and swimming faster/harder is just that: effort level. Fast swimming begets fast swimming.
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  #7  
Old 08-26-2015
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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I mean that as one ages one tends to slow down. This seems to be a more or less inevitable process, although in principle if one is too slow to start with, then it should be possible to find some speed.

I started swimming masters at age 71 in 2006. Since then I have improved some times but the overall trend is to swim even slower. This year I equalled my best time for 200m Back and I believe it should be possible to improve it. We shall see.
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Old 08-26-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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I see swimming 100 free under the magic minute is certainly no easy feat.
Only 15% of the 17-18 year old boys can do it.
Full of energy, and probably with a lot of swim experience allready at that age.

Its funny that under 10 boys and girls results are virtually identical.
Girls have almost reached their peak at 14, boys at 16.

Last edited by Zenturtle : 08-26-2015 at 02:42 PM.
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  #9  
Old 08-26-2015
descending descending is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richardsk View Post
I mean that as one ages one tends to slow down. This seems to be a more or less inevitable process, although in principle if one is too slow to start with, then it should be possible to find some speed.

I started swimming masters at age 71 in 2006. Since then I have improved some times but the overall trend is to swim even slower. This year I equalled my best time for 200m Back and I believe it should be possible to improve it. We shall see.
That's great! I'm not saying you can't get faster with your approach. I'm simply talking about an overall evidence that that fastest people in the pool regardless of age and experience train very differently than the 'long slow distance' mantras of old. They are looking at the clock and pushing themselves and others in their lane trying to boost their fitness levels to get every ounce of performance out of their body they can in addition to refining technique.
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  #10  
Old 08-26-2015
Danny Danny is offline
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Is the longest distance for competitive swimming 1500 m? If so, what about training for multi-mile open water distances? Descending, do you have any data on the "speed first" approach to these marathon events in open water?
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