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  #1  
Old 10-25-2009
vol vol is offline
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Default How fast/slow are you in your daily practice?

I am super slow. I usually swim laps with a brief rest (no more than 30 seconds in most cases) between about every two laps. Including the rest time, it often takes me 1 minute per 1 lap (25 yards)! It's not just that I am not used to swimming non-stop, but also, it seems swimming with rests gets me better prepared to swim a better next lap. But in this speed I can only do 1,500 yards in a 1-hour session, not even 1 mile a day. I'm planning to work on my speed and reduce my rests. (People usually ask "Can you swim 100m in under 60 seconds? ;()

I'd be interested to know how other people do in their daily practice, speed-wise and rest-wise. :)

--Another thing I'm interested: when you take a short rest between laps on the deeper end of the pool, do you hold the lane line or tread water without depending on the support of lane line or the wall?
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
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I'm pretty slow at practice as well. Maybe 25s per 25y of crawl. Low 20's are possible with effort. My time for speed hasn't come yet. haha

I'd consider 15s per 25y to be pretty fast.

Rest is variable. I go by feel, not time. If I want to build a little endurance, I'll rest less. If I want to relax more, I'll rest more. And sometimes I just play with the water.

If I rest at the deep end, I hang on the wall. (It would be nice to have a ledge to stand on.) I prefer to rest at the shallow end so I can stand and get to less chlorinated air.
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2009
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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100m in less than a minute is very, very fast. Not that many masters swimmers can do it, except at elite levels. I'm not sure why people are asking you that, it's an eyeballs-out sprint, not the sort of pace you'd maintain for a long fitness swim.

Speed is relative. I'm a lot faster now than when I first started swimming 10 years ago, but still slow compared to the fastest people at the pool. Back then, it took me about a full minute to complete 25m - not including a rest. Now I average about 33 seconds per length in a continuous long-distance (500m or more) swim, can do a very brisk 100 in just under 2 minutes, a fast 50 in 55 seconds, and a single sprint length in about 25 seconds.

If you're having to rest every 50m, the problem is probably not your speed but your ability to relax and breath consistently. Getting enough oxygen by breathing often enough is important, so is saving it by swimming efficiently. If you want to shorten the 30 second rest, try closing your eyes and taking 3 deep breaths through your nose to relax, then pushing off again.

As to resting at the deep end, I don't think it really matters whether you hold the wall or not.
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  #4  
Old 10-25-2009
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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I'll try to keep this short. Took a TI workshop Jan of 08 at 61 yo. I had swam since a child at times putting in up to 2400 yds per day when training for triathelons. As the years passed it bacame obvious that I was not getting any better and swimming was a struggle. Through these younger years I was always able to muscle my way through with no problem, never being fast but having great stamina. While watching others swim I always marveled at those who just looked fluid and smooth. I'm not talking of the fastest, but those who looked as if they were swimming effortlessly. Heard of TI and liked what I was told. Fast forward to the TI workshop and a whole new world. I was the only one out of the workshop that actually had an increase in SPL at the end vdeo taping. Now to your concerns of times. I had to undo and reprogram 30 years of old muscle memory and mental habits. Believe it or not I could not even compete one lap, everything was so different and strange. Nothing went together as I knew it. I was determined to move forward and it has been a very slow and methodical journey. Drill, drill and more drills. I did not even attempt a whole stroke until about six months ago. FYI I got more than one what are you doing coment. I have now progressed to where I am doing whole stroke, with some semblence of success. My whole stroke drills started very much as you describe. I would swim 25 and stop for 30 secs regroup decide what I want to focus on for the next 25. Depending on how much I glide the 25 will take approx.30-35 secs. Stop rest another 30secs. do another. Yes I hold on to the wall in the deep end. The whole point is to rest and refocus which can't be done treading water. You are exactly right in getting better prepared for the nest lap. I have now progressed to throwing in a 50, shortening the rest period and even doing 100's. I can do 1000 in 30 minutes and stay within my comfort zone. I enjoy it more and truly feel as though improvement is happening. It is a progression and often we believe that it is not happening quick enough. Patience and practice are the keys for me. Enough I hope this helps and in closing I do not know a whole lot of people who can swim a 100 in less than 60. Enjoy the journey

Westy
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  #5  
Old 10-25-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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Vol-
When I started swimming 4 years ago, my pace was about the same as yours. 25 yards in 35 seconds and then rest 25 seconds -- 4:00 per 100 yd.

Yesterday, a friend and I did 3 x 200 yards in 3:15, 3:00, and 3:01. A pace of 1:30 - 1:38 per 100, which is pretty common pace for reasonably good fitness swimmers.

Stick with the program.
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  #6  
Old 10-25-2009
CoachEricDeSanto CoachEricDeSanto is offline
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My pace also depends on the reason for the swim. I try to keep my "learning a focal point pace" about 1.5x slower than my easy speed. I am currently not swimming much, so my paces are off, but I can usually hold 1:30/100yds free for distance on focal points I am just imprinting. Focal points I am learning I usually slow down to 2:00-2:15. The slower you go, the harder it is to cheat.
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  #7  
Old 10-26-2009
vol vol is offline
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Thanks all for sharing your experiences. A little comfort to me. ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhoda View Post
If you're having to rest every 50m, the problem is probably not your speed but your ability to relax and breath consistently.
Thank you for pointing that out, Rhoda. Indeed, my breathing is not even and smooth. Quite often I feel short of breath at the end of a lap--curiously, it's always at the shallow end of the pool that I have such problem. When I finish a lap at the deep end, my strokes always gets more and more relaxed and I'm more buoyant. At the shallow end, when I finish, I almost hit the bottom of the pool. Do any of you experience the same? Are we supposed to be more buoyant at the deeper end? That's not what Archimedes' Principle says...?
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  #8  
Old 10-26-2009
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vol View Post
That's not what Archimedes' Principle says...?
No, that principle says that buoyancy doesn't change with water depth as it entirely depends on the weight of water that is displaced by an object.
I read somewhere that there is this kind of 'objective' buoyancy and there is a subjective perception of buoyancy. Means, how we feel our buoyancy. Those two can be quite different.
And there seem to be people who feel more buoyant in deep water. Whatever the reason is.

Do you think you would loose your buoyancy if you didn't know that it's the shallow end ? Stupid question, maybe...

Last edited by haschu33 : 10-26-2009 at 01:48 PM.
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  #9  
Old 10-31-2009
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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There was a timer running in the pool today and I could see that I had a quite consistent 50m time of 1:15 with 35 strokes. I am practicing balance, rhythm and breathing. My stroke rate is quite low obviously, roughly 2 secs per stroke or 30 per minute. I actually don't mind, because for me it is a good stroke rate for practicing. I try to get a little higher stroke count, though, to have a more continuous stroke. I ordered a tempo trainer and I wanted to get to a 1.5 sec per stroke rate, but I find it quite difficult to increase the stroke rate. I guess it will get easier with time.
Still the 50 m pool is quite a killer, I find it a lot easier in a 25 m pool. In a 25 m pool I can do laps with only a short break in between, and then do a longer break after 3 or 4 laps. In the 50 m it takes me a minute or so after each lap to gather myself for the next one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vol View Post
--Another thing I'm interested: when you take a short rest between laps on the deeper end of the pool, do you hold the lane line or tread water without depending on the support of lane line or the wall?
All of the 50 m pools, and most of the 25 m pools where I am swimming are deep all the way. They all have a ledge at the end, actually they have a ledge all around. Maybe that is a legal requirement for pools in Germany. It definitely is nice to have.
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  #10  
Old 11-01-2009
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Default Speed ? --- we are trying for speed ???

I'm in no rush and haven't really checked how long it takes me. Some others have said I'm fast but at this point it doesn't concern me. I really don't think I'm very fast. My interest is to become smooth and try to build a consistency and technique. Speed can come later. I would really happy to look 1/32 as smooth as Shinji. I was once told on this forum that it isn't the destination but the journey that counts. Sometimes a slow journey is more rewarding than the destination we're after.

In the deep end I rest while hanging onto the wall; or perhaps I watch the clock as a check on my vertical kicking duration. I often use the deep end wall to drive myself down to touch the bottom.

Now I'll have to check the clocks to see just how slow I really am.
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