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  #1  
Old 01-06-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Default Sun Yang Photos - commit every stroke

Was re watching the WR 1500m race, again (I watch it at least twice a month, there is always a new angle to look at him from)

took some ipad photos on certain freeze frames.

These are couple of shots taken at the point where the arms cross. Its very TI here.

Hand about to enter the water, other hand finished the catch. Look at how symmetrical the angle of each elbow is, notice the angle of rotation as he gets ready to apply the power, notice the opposite leg is ready to kick down. Look at how extreme and committed the position is for someone taking 70+ strokes a minute.
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File Type: jpg sunyangTI.jpg (57.4 KB, 180 views)
File Type: jpg sunyangTI2.jpg (56.2 KB, 165 views)
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  #2  
Old 01-06-2012
arunks arunks is offline
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The 1st pic clearly shows the EVF where the lead arm has initiated the catch before the other arm enters(Hip rotation).TI talks about the patient lead hand, how does this relate to the Front Quadrant timing wrt TI.

Last edited by arunks : 01-06-2012 at 09:06 AM.
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  #3  
Old 01-06-2012
Mike Wray Mike Wray is offline
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I think this style is very TI. The second picture shows both hands in the front quadrant.
Mike
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  #4  
Old 01-06-2012
terry terry is offline
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If his left hand had not been patient a moment earlier, it should be under his torso, rather than forward of his shoulder, at that point in his weight shift.

This would have the following effects:
1) Drag would be higher - because bodyline shorter.
2) The left-arm stroke he's taking would have been more reliant on weaker and fatigue-prone arm and shoulder muscles, rather than the power of weight shift, which is both greater and relatively cost-free.
3) He very possibly would have stirred up the water molecules behind his hand and arm, rather than keep them quiet -- i.e. moving the water around, rather than moving his body forward.
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  #5  
Old 01-06-2012
arunks arunks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
If his left hand had not been patient a moment earlier, it should be under his torso, rather than forward of his shoulder, at that point in his weight shift.

This would have the following effects:
1) Drag would be higher - because bodyline shorter.
2) The left-arm stroke he's taking would have been more reliant on weaker and fatigue-prone arm and shoulder muscles, rather than the power of weight shift, which is both greater and relatively cost-free.
3) He very possibly would have stirred up the water molecules behind his hand and arm, rather than keep them quiet -- i.e. moving the water around, rather than moving his body forward.
Thanks Terry for the reply.The attached pics reiterate the point about the patient lead hand(Just enough) before the catch exhibited by SunYang.
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File Type: jpg Sunyang pic1.jpg (66.9 KB, 108 views)
File Type: jpg Sunyang pic2.jpg (67.2 KB, 98 views)
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  #6  
Old 01-06-2012
terry terry is offline
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Andy
I'm impressed by your avid study of Sun Yang's swim - both in your devoting time regularly to watch the video, and in creating screen shots for further visual imprinting.
Will 2012 be the year you start on the path to becoming a TI Coach?
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  #7  
Old 01-06-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
Andy
I'm impressed by your avid study of Sun Yang's swim - both in your devoting time regularly to watch the video, and in creating screen shots for further visual imprinting.
Will 2012 be the year you start on the path to becoming a TI Coach?
I think we start on the path once we commit our faith to the TI technique, whether student or coach. Path's have to lead somewhere and right now I do not think there is sufficient demand for coaching in my little town (I might start hovering on the local clubs facebook page though and see if I can generate any discussion on technique), however, hosting a Norwegian open water camp sometime in the future could be an idea worth seeding.

The lakes here are stunning, filled with drinking water and offer unrestricted swimming from Mid April to end August. (water temp 10+)

Today I am recovering from a pulled muscle in my back caused by having my mp3 player casing pushing on the soft part of my neck last week, so my session this evening will be a good chance for some Yang style imprinting in the front quadrant.

Next week I plan to get back on to the Ian Mac type sets. I like to alternate between primary focus on core technique and primary focus on aerobic/SPL consistency etc.

Need to put a time in my signature for 2012 too.
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  #8  
Old 01-07-2012
kilgoretrout kilgoretrout is offline
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So if I understand this pic right, when my hand is just ready to touch the water, my other arm should be sort of tucked a bit, just getting ready to pull?

I think I have gone overboard with the patient lead hand since my hand is still outstretched in front of me when my other hand hits the water. I guess I need to actually initiate the catch by bringing my lead arm in a bit, so when my other hand hits the water, I can rotate and pull.

Right?
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  #9  
Old 01-07-2012
Mike Wray Mike Wray is offline
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I think you are right, but in practice I wonder if it is best to be guided by feel here. For me there seems to be a "sweet spot" for initiation of the catch. If I try to move my extended arm back too soon I lose all feel for the catch.
Mike

Last edited by Mike Wray : 01-07-2012 at 09:59 AM.
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  #10  
Old 01-07-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Kilgoretrout is right, by the time your spear hand enters the water your catch needs to be ready as you are already throwing the spear for forward propulsion.

How soon before the spear you set up the catch is a matter of choice and experience.

The good guys time it to be all one motion, I am not quite there yet.
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