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  #41  
Old 01-01-2012
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swim2Bfree View Post
What were your times? With Paul Newsome, I know what an English Channel crossing means, and I know what 11th overall at Rottnest means.
You missed the point. It wasn't whether TI or SwimSmooth makes people faster. I was responding to the dismissive claims that "TI makes you pretty-but-slow." Which infers we only care about aesthetics, not realizing your full potential.

The competitive-arena successes of so many TI coaches shows that the 'empirical' aspects of improving in mathematically-measurable ways is part of our larger Kaizen framework.

The time on a stopwatch isn't without value, but it's a narrow lens through which to think about what it means to realize one's full potential.

When I DID decide to pursue national championships and age group records in my mid-50s, demonstrating that TI does indeed support one's goals of competitive success was only half my motivation.

To my mind, it was at least as important to use that project to validate the principles of Kaizen and the behaviors of Mastery which we emphasize at least as much as 'fishlike' techniques.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 01-01-2012 at 10:43 PM.
  #42  
Old 01-01-2012
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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"I recently found an exceptional article that might inspire swimmers everywhere http://members.fortunecity.com/magnu...freestyle.html
Hope you enjoy."

I found the article interesting, but not always entirely convincing, and, being an inveterate pedant, I was also annoyed by several spelling mistakes.

I followed a link in the bibliography to this:

http://www.somaxsports.com/photo.php?analysis=dara

which, again, I didn't find entirely convincing, although interesting.
  #43  
Old 01-01-2012
terry terry is offline
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Default Streamlining: A Values Statement, not just a techniquealues

Quote:
Originally Posted by PlumFlower View Post
SS seems to offer a lot of advice on proper catch and pull. (TI even minimizes the term pull). SS even have a DVD (catch masterclass) on catch. If TI has a similar product, I believe I will buy from TI.
PF, thank you for your heart-warming comments. I've addressed the question of TI's seeming 'neglect' of the catch-and-pull in a variety of places, but this seems an opportune time to gather all the reasons in one statement.

Our decision to place such strong emphasis on balance and streamline - and to explicitly de-emphasize "the pull" isn't a simple matter of neglecting a part of the stroke everyone outside TI considers critical. It's a Values Statement--which we make while recognizing it may not be 'smart marketing strategy.' Here's why:

1. The Pull doesn't lack for advocates. Whether books, videos, content of workouts, instruction from teachers, drills given by coaches -- even comments from the layman in the next lane--EVERYONE in the swim world has something to say about 'the right way to pull.' Unfortunately, 95 percent is uninformed, misguided, or lacking in essential context.
Whereas advocates for Balance and Streamline are a tiny band - nearly all within TI - straining to be heard amidst the babble (or Babel?) of Advice on Pulling.

2. The Pull is deeply embedded in human nature. Nearly everyone's first swimming experience is a near-death experience during which it seems that furious arm-churning is all that stands between you and an untimely demise. And what message from the brain drowns out all others when we want to swim faster? PULL . . . harder and faster. Recall how well that worked out for Alain Bernard on the last 50 of the mens 4x100 in Beijing -- 46 PULLS compared to Lezak's 34 STROKES?
TI takes the position that we DO have to go so far as to say "Don't Pull" to give the cerebral cortex a countervoice to the amygdala's loud insistence on churning away.

3. Arms Dept/Legs Dept. The non-TI swim world conceives of the swimming body as An Upper Body That Pulls and a Lower Body That Kicks. Virtually all traditional drills reinforce this notion. And much of training (pulling sets, kicking sets, paddles and fins) are devoted to encoding that concept ever more deeply -- in cognitive as well as motor neurons. Which is a large part of the reason why Bernard 'lost his head' in the most important race of his life -- and a majority of the field in any triathlon swim does the same.
TI alone 'stands athwart tradition' staying Stop! Swim with your Whole Body - not your Arms and Legs.

4. Research has unequivocally proven the superiority of Streamlining. In 1992 USA Swimming biomechanist Jane Cappaert measured the stroking power of swimmers at the Barcelona Olympics. Post-Olympics when she analyzed the results, she was stunned to learn that finalists generated 16% less stroking power than also-rans. Her conclusion: The distinguishing characteristic of the world's fastest swimmers is "superior whole-body streamlining." In 2005, DARPA engineers found that human swimmers convert only 3% of energy and power into forward motion, while dolphins convert 80%. Their conclusion: Dolphins have a remarkable knack for "active streamlining."

5. Balance and Streamline are Foundation skills. We improve Balance and Streamline via a focus on large body parts and muscle groups. They involve gross motor coordination. To improve Propulsion, we must rely far more heavily on fine motor skills, targeting much smaller muscle groups, much more subtle kinesthetic awareness and much more complex neural networks. Also, the body control one acquires through Balance and Streamline is utterly essential to being able to execute the complex motions of a highly-effective catch. If an untutored swimmer is 3% efficient and elites are 9%, nearly all of us can get to between 7% and 8% almost solely through improvements in Balance and Streamline. A Better Catch/Pull begins to equal Balance and Streamline in possible impact in that range. I'd estimate that of the 10,000-odd swimmers I've encountered in 22 yrs of teaching TI, a few hundred were above 6% efficiency.

6. We DO teach Pulling Skills. Many people, who've attended a workshop or learned via DVD, come to me for instruction in advanced skills with a 'better pull' usually at the top of their list. I shoot video then show them they already have a good pull. They're nearly always surprised because they thought they were 'only' working on Balance and Streamline.

I explain that our approach to teaching body position and alignment leads to an integrated stroke that includes superior propulsive characteristics.
  • Learning balance or weightlessness gives the arms time to get a grip.
  • Wide Tracks improves lateral stability. It's also a key component of 'Early Vertical Forearm'
  • 'Hanging Your Hand' improves Balance. It also puts the hand in the optimal catch position.
  • 'Separating Water Molecules' reduces wave drag. But 'calm' molecules greatly improve traction.
  • A Patient Lead Hand reduces wave drag--by keeping your bodyline longer. It also allows time to cultivate a grip.
  • The rhythmic weight shift connects the Patient and Relaxed Hand to the most effective power source.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 01-01-2012 at 12:05 PM.
  #44  
Old 01-01-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
  • Learning balance or weightlessness gives the arms time to get a grip.
  • Wide Tracks improves lateral stability. It's also a key component of 'Early Vertical Forearm'
  • 'Hanging Your Hand' improves Balance. It also puts the hand in the optimal catch position.
  • 'Separating Water Molecules' reduces wave drag. But 'calm' molecules greatly improve traction.
  • A Patient Lead Hand reduces wave drag--by keeping your bodyline longer. It also allows time to cultivate a grip.
  • The rhythmic weight shift connects the Patient and Relaxed Hand to the most effective power source.
This is concise enough for me to learn by heart by printing and putting on my toilet wall
  #45  
Old 01-01-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
This is concise enough for me to learn by heart by printing and putting on my toilet wall
Andy, I'd like to see you adding a 200 & 800 in your sig line so we can see the doubling efforts. :)
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USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

  #46  
Old 01-01-2012
johnny.widen johnny.widen is offline
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Default TI coaches live as they preach

What attracts me very much with TI coaches is that they live as they preach. They have themselves genuine practice of how to balance, streamline and propulse. This is a solid base for trust.

Is there such a thing as Swim Smooth coaches and do they live as they preach?
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  #47  
Old 01-01-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny.widen View Post
What attracts me very much with TI coaches is that they live as they preach. They have themselves genuine practice of how to balance, streamline and propulse. This is a solid base for trust.

Is there such a thing as Swim Smooth coaches and do they live as they preach?
Fiona posted something similar on her facebook page about how these 3 principals could apply to anything in life. ;)
__________________
Suzanne Atkinson, MD
Level 3 USAT Coach
USA Paralympic Triathlon Coach
Coach of 5 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

  #48  
Old 01-01-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
Andy, I'd like to see you adding a 200 & 800 in your sig line so we can see the doubling efforts. :)
:) Day 1 of my second season starts tomorrow, equipped with my H20 audio kit and a load of slow 6/8 blues. 10 days half forced rest has been interesting. Also threw all my biscuits and chocolate away today, no more brown food, I love new years, we should have them more often.
  #49  
Old 01-01-2012
Golden Rectangle Golden Rectangle is offline
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Default Kazien means to keep learning

If we are really trying to practice a kazien mastery of swimming, and of life, don't we look to learn and gain insight from all sources?

Human beings learn in many different ways, and not everyone responds to the same teaching technique.

As a student and customer of both TI and SS I can say that both have shown me steps along my path. Sometimes seeing essentially the same idea presented in a different way, or just worded differently, make a light click, that had not before. As I do more and more drills in my swimming, some from the TI material, and some from the SS material, I see more similarities than differences. Sometimes I'm not even sure which program the drill came from, I just keep it in my repertoire because it seems to help me.

TI has taught me a very effective 2 beat kick which has completely changed my swimming. SS has helped me figure out what a high elbow really means, and that too has completely changed my swimming. I remember thinking, as I figured it out, 'this is what the TI instructor was talking about.'

I am currently working through a 35 lesson training plan from SS, for me it offers a more balanced approach to building technique, endurance, and speed. My lessons so far in TI have been overwhelmingly focused on technique, and I never feel that I'm building much long distance or speed endurance. But even as I'm doing the SS training sessions, I hear the voice in my head that is Terry saying, 'Never practice struggling', and 'fitness is a byproduct of perfecting technique.

Again, kazien is a journey, and we don't really know where it will lead. Why not be open to all the teachers along the way. There are lots of swimming websites and videos out there. Thanks to aging boomers, and the popularity of Tri's, swimming is an exploding field, and finding an optimal technique seems to be a still changing goal.
  #50  
Old 01-01-2012
KatieK KatieK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
Andy, I'd like to see you adding a 200 & 800 in your sig line so we can see the doubling efforts. :)
I really appreciate that signature. I learn so much from seeing what other people can do. I couldn't swim 100m in 1:21 TO SAVE MY LIFE, but I could give Andy a run for his money on the 400. He'd beat me no problem, but I'd be in it.

I notice that at Masters too--some people really know how to sprint. I am not one of those people.
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