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Old 04-09-2017
sclim sclim is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,499
sclim
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I have just came home today from a 10 k (road) race that I run every spring. I improved dramatically from last year's time, but that may be because last year's performance was shortly after adopting a low carbohydrate diet, which, although it improves endurance vastly beyond 3 hours of competition, may reduce VO2max slightly to the point where 10k running races are slightly degraded. I think in this year that has since passed my metabolism has slowly adapted back to help to recover my higher end performance. It's not quite as good as my 2015 time, but then, I am 2 years older. And I did have a somwhat intense swimming session yesterday.

But what really has blown me away has been that all this discussion on technique in improving swimming speed in this TI forum has really got me thinking hard about technique in running. I tend to be a technique geek anyway, and bore all my running buddies to tears. But I thought I had optimized the technique aspect of my running all that I could, and that further optimization was unlikely to happen. But today, during the race, even at pretty close to maximal effort, I was able to have the presence of mind to get a grip on myself and adjust posture, to relax somewhat, to adjust my gait to a smoother more relaxed, slightly higher cadence cycle that I had practiced in training, and found myself getting more efficient in real time, getting some breath back while maintaining speed, or even speeding up a bit without paying more fatigue penalty. I ran a perfectly paced race, hitting the 5k mark in exactly half my 10 k time! This all is very TI in spirit, and I think I have got the idea and ability to put it into practice during countless TI drills where focus is essential despite the distraction of physical and mental fatigue and where some of the newly learned mechanical movements are quite difficult to get just right.

Even in running, the secret of getting faster is to maintain form/technique (or even improval, Tom) despite faster pace.

TI really is the gift that keeps on giving!

Last edited by sclim : 04-09-2017 at 10:45 PM.
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