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-   -   Pull to Recover (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/showthread.php?t=505)

shuumai 06-09-2009 07:21 PM

Pull to Recover
 
I'm still feeling that I must begin the pull in order to get my other arm to start recovery. Watching the TI video, it seems that the recovery starts during the catch, not the pull. Is what I'm experiencing unusual? I'm thinking that my timing is making my legs sink more.

daveblt 06-10-2009 01:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shuumai (Post 3692)
I'm still feeling that I must begin the pull in order to get my other arm to start recovery. Watching the TI video, it seems that the recovery starts during the catch, not the pull. Is what I'm experiencing unusual? I'm thinking that my timing is making my legs sink more.


How do you feel overall on your back ? do you feel balanced ? This could be the problem . The arms are pretty much opposed so as one hand goes in the other should be coming out, so the recovery does start during the catch. As one arm is starting the catch the opposite recovery arm should feel relaxed with fingers loose as it comes out of the water if your body is balanced.If your body is not balanced then your arms may feel like their stuck in certain positions of the stroke because they don't feel coordinated. Have you tried the backstroke switch drill where you stroke with one arm and recover the other but you don't stop the recovery arm at the hip but instead stop at a point with the hand over the surface of the water ? This could help your timing .

Dave

CoachEricDeSanto 06-10-2009 03:33 PM

Shumai,
As we discussed the last couple days in my post on timing, I believe both options are useful. Here is what I have discovered.

1. It is harder to hold balance while setting the catch during recovery. But with extra focus it can be done.
2. When I recover with the catch I rotate a bit farther and start the recovery earlier (at my waist). When I set the catch later (with the spear), it helps to throw the arm around the back half. It feels a lot like the Karate chop release of fly. Shinji has also posted about the underwater finish in which he uses a wrist flick launch his elbow forward. Both of these options help. When I catch later, the recovery must be faster and more aggressive and that adds momentum when it enters.

As I said before, I am still exploring these so I don't know if one is better.

madvet 06-10-2009 03:40 PM

The drill where you lift your arm up 45 degrees and back down again is the one to use. I usually do it,

LIFT
DOWN
LIFT
DOWN
LIFT
STROKE

This should get your timing right. Keep your extended arm extended until you get your recovering arm up (I usually think of it as a "third-of-the-way" which would actually make it 60 degrees)

shuumai 06-10-2009 07:17 PM

Oh, the drill in which the recovering arm stops above the water, I've tried that. It's difficult. That might be a sign that it will be helpful to master. I'll work on it more.

I routinely raise my recovering arm slowly and sometimes hold it there or return it to the water. That usually messes up the timing of my kick though. If I can coordinate that drill with the kick, I think it would work much nicer.

What I feel as far as balance goes is that my legs sink more than I want them to. It feels like both arms are below chest level at the same time which adds to the imbalance. But then there are times when I feel so flat that the kick loses power. Sometimes I hit it just right and I can feel that I'm moving more easily.

(I'm becoming more interested in working on the backstroke, but I don't have a reasonably good turn to use with it. I haven't mastered the flip turn yet. I haven't even used the flip during regular laps yet. That being the case, I don't work on the stroke much.)

shuumai 06-10-2009 11:08 PM

Hmm, I wonder if I have a dropped elbow pull, at least on one side. Maybe if I spend more time setting my catch, my recovering arm will have time to catch up. I can't wait to get to the pool and try something. (Little things like a root canal and thunderstorms are getting in my way.)

madvet 06-11-2009 02:59 PM

Flip turns
 
Flip turns are not my strong point even in freestyle. In backstroke, you have to have a very consistent stroke length in order to judge the distance since you are doing it blind. I usually do open turns for backstroke -- they are easy to do, just like open turns in freestyle, and they don't take much more time than a flip turn (probably faster than a bad flip turn) and you don't risk disqualification if you are in a race.


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