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-   -   Correct Swim Posture (http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/showthread.php?t=3836)

andyinnorway 09-30-2012 02:11 PM

Correct Swim Posture
 
In studying chi running to help my triathlon training, body alignment and posture is lesson 1 and the cornerstone of the technique

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UYkAB18wgs

Would this long spine posture also be recommended for swimming and should the pelvis be neutral or tilted back?

bx 09-30-2012 03:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andyinnorway (Post 31424)
Would this long spine posture also be recommended for swimming and should the pelvis be neutral or tilted back?

I think the long spine is basically what laser-lead head is about?

For the pelvic tilt, this most recently came up here:

http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/...ighlight=jamie

Jamie Shaules has an interest in this topic. I emailed him and he said he'd post up a new YouTube vid in due course.

http://www.youtube.com/user/jshaules/videos

mjm 10-01-2012 05:42 PM

Running Technique 101
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by andyinnorway (Post 31424)
In studying chi running to help my triathlon training, body alignment and posture is lesson 1 and the cornerstone of the technique

Andy: You might check out this review of Pose and Chi running published on a web site called Science of Sport. You might also scroll to the last article:

"Running technique 101 - a whirlwind tour of optimal running technique"

that sums up what I try to do and has kept me running beginning in my late twenties to now in my mid-sixties "relatively" injury free. I do not Lean forward with the shoulders. Good luck with your training. mjm

http://www.sportsscientists.com/search?q=chi+running

Their conclusions
•Trying to make radical, wholesale changes to running technique is probably not the optimal way to go, for it simply transfers the point of loading on the skeleton to another area. Specifically, the research study discussed in Part III of the series (a study we were both involved in at UCT) found that 2 weeks of training caused the loading on the knee to be reduced, but the loading on the ankle increased.
•This change in loading is linked to the numerous anecdotal reports of athletes developing Achilles tendon and calf muscle problems after learning Pose, anecdotes which were borne out by the follow up to that study (the part of the study that was never published, incidentally)
•Our recommendation is to look for incremental changes in technique, rather than falling prey to common sense and sound biomechanics packaged as a miracle cure for injuries through marketing strategies


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