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  #1  
Old 02-07-2016
sachintha sachintha is offline
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sachintha
Default Reasons for the arched back and how to fix it?

Hi,
In a recent underwater video I was surprised to see the amount of back arching happening
(by arching I mean my head and butt being relatively close to the surface while midsection is towards the bottom of the pool as in a banana shape). I think this obviously breaks the head-spine alignment.

So the question is what causes this and how can I fix this? I believe I could significantly reduce the drag and improve body position if I could sort this out.

Regards,
Sachintha.
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  #2  
Old 02-07-2016
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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More female than males have this. Its to attract males probably.
fix it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5PYspkknE
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  #3  
Old 02-07-2016
sachintha sachintha is offline
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Thank you very much for the video link. I am a male and I can assure you that I have no intension what so ever of attracting males :)
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  #4  
Old 02-07-2016
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sachintha View Post
Hi,
In a recent underwater video I was surprised to see the amount of back arching happening
(by arching I mean my head and butt being relatively close to the surface while midsection is towards the bottom of the pool as in a banana shape). I think this obviously breaks the head-spine alignment.

So the question is what causes this and how can I fix this? I believe I could significantly reduce the drag and improve body position if I could sort this out.

Regards,
Sachintha.
the most common reason for arching your back is lack of proper torso stabilization technique. the reason why you might do it more in the water is to attempt to lift your arms/head and butt/legs up to the surface, thus forming an arch with your body at both ends.

you will likely have an arched back while standing on dryland. thus often the postural problem starts on dryland and is transferred to water.

the easy fix is to try Torpedo (stand tall like a statue and straight up with arms at sides), and then holding this position, lean forward like a tower falling, and fall into the water and attempt to hold your straight body position despite falling into the water and now you are not even standing any more. You will need to engage your core and figure out how to turn on stability up and down your spine to stop you from losing your shape even though you may be floating in the water.

the harder and longer but more proper way to do this, is to:

1) make sure you are diaphragmatically breathing.
2) once you can d-breathe, then learn how to generate intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) with each breath inhale.

proper IAP generation will engage the correct internal torso stabilizing muscles which will not wipe out despite being used for long periods of time. they are designed to stabilize all day long but if you don't d-breathe, they will stop engaging which is bad.

the torpedo leaning exercise can help with this, but you can hold a straight stiff body by using other core muscles. it is possible to do this while swimming, but you may find it hard to maintain this for long periods of time.

If you want a taste of d-breathing and IAP training, check out this post of mine:

http://www.dshen.com/blogs/training/..._pressure.html
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  #5  
Old 02-07-2016
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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This post may also be good for you to read, regarding d-breathing:

http://www.dshen.com/blogs/training/...breathing.html
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  #6  
Old 02-07-2016
sachintha sachintha is offline
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Thanks David. You are spot on regarding my dry land posture. I tend to have anterior pelvic tilt which makes the back arch prominent. But I have worked on stretching (specially the hip flexors) and strengthening for some time and it is significantly less severe now.

When you say "harder and longer but more proper way to do this ...", do you mean harder to learn but easier to maintain for longer swims once learnt or harder to learn and also harder (more effort) to maintain?
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  #7  
Old 02-07-2016
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sachintha View Post
Thanks David. You are spot on regarding my dry land posture. I tend to have anterior pelvic tilt which makes the back arch prominent. But I have worked on stretching (specially the hip flexors) and strengthening for some time and it is significantly less severe now.

When you say "harder and longer but more proper way to do this ...", do you mean harder to learn but easier to maintain for longer swims once learnt or harder to learn and also harder (more effort) to maintain?
sorry bad choice of words. harder = more time/difficulty to learn due to doing something for so long as habit, and to create a new habit while removing the old one.

however, if you do this, it will take MUCH LESS EFFORT and a LOT LESS ENERGY to maintain torso stability in the water using the internal torso stabilizers (ie. transverse abdominis) which were built for this, versus other torso muscles which are typically primary movers (ie. obliques, rectus abdominis) and aren't built to maintain stability for long periods of time. You'll likely wipe them out and lose stability once you tire.

you may also want to explore the dead bug:

http://www.dshen.com/blogs/training/..._dead_bug.html

note that i need to shoot that video again. one crucial point i did not describe in there was the importance of lifting your tailbone off the ground while doing this. this will engage your anterior core and give you feedback when it has let go (ie. tailbone touches the ground again).

it is only through proper IAP generation that you will be able to sustain dead bug reps. otherwise, you'll start vibrating and shaking like crazy. but that's ok in the beginning - that's also your nervous system telling you it's learning.

good luck and let me know if you have other questions.
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  #8  
Old 02-07-2016
sachintha sachintha is offline
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Awesome. Thanks David.
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  #9  
Old 02-08-2016
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Coach Dave

Watched most of your "dead bug" video and have one suggestion. NOt sure if anyone else has this problem, but here is what it is. You are lying on a black mat and also wearing black clothes. I can't see what is going on with your breathing because the black clothes blend right in with the black mat. Maybe this is just my problem with my eyesight. I do have a problem with anything that is black. Cataract surgery did not do anything helpful with this problem.

Anyway maybe if you were thinking of refilming this, wear a different color of clothes?

Sherry
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  #10  
Old 02-08-2016
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jenson1a View Post
Coach Dave

Watched most of your "dead bug" video and have one suggestion. NOt sure if anyone else has this problem, but here is what it is. You are lying on a black mat and also wearing black clothes. I can't see what is going on with your breathing because the black clothes blend right in with the black mat. Maybe this is just my problem with my eyesight. I do have a problem with anything that is black. Cataract surgery did not do anything helpful with this problem.

Anyway maybe if you were thinking of refilming this, wear a different color of clothes?

Sherry
But Black is the New Black! You are right. I will try to wear different color clothes next time ;-)!
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