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  #1  
Old 04-02-2012
Ladyfish Ladyfish is offline
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Default Advanced Workshop with Shinji -Terriffic!

My head is still spinning from all of the wonderful information the TI team provided at the Advanced Workshop with Shinji yesterday in Fremont. The weather was cold and the pool was chilly too, but all 10 of us made big improvements and can't wait to practice in our home pools.

Shinji directed the event which went about an hour beyond the scheduled finish time (no complaints from anyone though) which was to be expected since this was the first such workshop taught in the US.

Shinji directed the class which included lecture, dry land practice, video analysis, drills and lots of back and forth discussion with the athletes. Coach Jennifer Parham and Coach David Shen assisted and together they were an excellent team. Every minute was important and helpful.

I have spend countless hours analyzing Shinji's video, making screen shots, comparing every nuance I could find. I had run out of things to correct on my own so this workshop was a godsend. The athletes were well studied in TI and that helped us all absorb the information like sponges and be able to execute it quickly...I think even Shinji was suprised at how fast we learned.

If you want to swim like Shinji, you must take this class. Thank you TI Team.

Last edited by Ladyfish : 04-10-2012 at 03:07 AM.
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  #2  
Old 04-02-2012
Rupertdacat Rupertdacat is offline
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If possible, first and last workshop videos would be terrific.
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  #3  
Old 04-03-2012
dzhou01 dzhou01 is offline
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Hi Ladyfish,

I am glad you had a wonderful workshop. Do you mind sharing some of the focal points and drills that you found most useful? Thanks!
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  #4  
Old 04-08-2012
Ladyfish Ladyfish is offline
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Default Some Shinji highlights......

Quote:
Originally Posted by dzhou01 View Post
Hi Ladyfish,

I am glad you had a wonderful workshop. Do you mind sharing some of the focal points and drills that you found most useful? Thanks!
There were several revelations that really struck me.We have all watched Shinji's video and he looks relaxed, yet he travels tremendously far with each stroke. If all you know is basic TI, you focus on trying to streamline more. In this class we learned about how to apply active, rather small and explosive motion to our swimming. These small movements produce big propulsion when timed properly.

I found that simply mimicking Shinji's skating position requires the entire body to be fully engaged. I felt like a ballerina pointed from fingers to toes (for me, a VERY foreign feeling). This is a departure from the easy balance and relaxed, patient moves highlighted in the basic TI videos.

Shinji seeks to create contrast. He is either doing a quick and snappy motion, or he is still and streamlined. So it feels like "explode-recover-explode-recover".

So here's some info. about the 2 beat kick:
Keep the hips rather flat, not rotated. Keep the feet together and heels shallow at all times. Next, release (he calls it "loosening") one knee. The knee drops slightly but the heel stays high. At the moment of hand entry, you straighten the knee really fast. The top of your foot pushes down (snaps)forcefully then releases and returns to the home position.

Timing: Picture the bend in your elbow as it just touches the water, and the bend in your opposite knee. These 2 bends both straighten at the same moment (with force) and you spear the water, driving forward.

When your right hand enters, your left leg snaps and vice-versa.

This action pushes the left hip up out of the water (if your left leg snaps). So the focus is this snapping action rather than driving the opposite hip down.

We also learned to pull (yes, we actually used the "P" word!). We experimented using a Superman Glide and letting both arms drop at the same time (like a butterfly stroke) to determine where our arms must be in the stroking process (nearly vertical) in order to push water back without causing the body to lift vertically.

There is one more snap which comes in the last 6 or so inches of the pull before the hand exits. The resistance of the water against your palm makes the wrist bend and creates a rebound like feeling that propels your elbow forward on recovery faster.

I would not be surprised if we see an advanced TI DVD sometime soon (although this was not discussed, one can hope!). Shinji has created several drills and he is an excellent teacher. He is very analytical and is able to explain the concepts clearly. I highly recommend the class to TI swimmers that are very solid with basic TI and have reached a plateau in their performance.
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  #5  
Old 04-08-2012
Golden Rectangle Golden Rectangle is offline
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Default Please mum may I have some more?

This is fascinating information, thanks for posting it. I'll have to go spend some time in the pool to get the hang of that kick. Could you talk a little more about the skate position? Is he focused on keeping abs engaged the whole time? Did he talk about breathing cycles?

You mentioned proper timing, so is he using the kick first to trigger the spear? Does the stroke start at the back and roll forward, or does it initiate from the core and roll out?
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  #6  
Old 04-08-2012
Ladyfish Ladyfish is offline
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Default More Shinji magic

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Originally Posted by Golden Rectangle View Post
This is fascinating information, thanks for posting it. I'll have to go spend some time in the pool to get the hang of that kick. Could you talk a little more about the skate position? Is he focused on keeping abs engaged the whole time?
This was not specifically discussed as I recall but keeping the torso aligned certainly was. No bending sideways or hyperextending (arching) the back. The pelvis neutral position is the goal I expect. Some of us (myself included) were even told to look a bit forward rather than down, to keep the laser aligned and pointed forward.

My comment about the effort to hold the skate position was directed more to having the glutes and legs engaged, (and by necessity the core as well). Keeping legs and feet together so the feet are actually touching and high in the water, without breaking the surface and creating splash. Perhaps this is why Shinji uses the term "loosening" of the knee. It is a contrast to the "tight" (my term) position the legs are otherwise in.

You asked: Did he talk about breathing cycles?
Ans: Not much although he might have answered questions on the issue.

You asked: You mentioned proper timing, so is he using the kick first to trigger the spear? Does the stroke start at the back and roll forward, or does it initiate from the core and roll out?
Ans: We talked a lot about this. He indicated that for beginners the leg snap and entry occur at the same moment (to drive the spear). Advanced timing is to kick at tad later after the spearing arm has entered in the water and is driving to full extension.

Your statement about the stroke starting from the back and rolling forward seems right and I think is key because when you watch the Shinji video the impression is that the pull (the front) is what initiates everything and that is not the case (an aha! moment).
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Old 04-08-2012
daveblt daveblt is offline
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I was wondering if he mentioned anything about the hand release as it leaves the water for recovery, that it should leave early by the hip and not pull all the way back ?

Dave
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  #8  
Old 04-08-2012
Ladyfish Ladyfish is offline
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Default Hand at Exit

Quote:
Originally Posted by daveblt View Post
I was wondering if he mentioned anything about the hand release as it leaves the water for recovery, that it should leave early by the hip and not pull all the way back ?

Dave
The finishing snap (push hard and quickly!) creates pushback from the water which propels the elbow forward. When you practice the snap you feel the sensation and that sensation, like a spring, is what I recall the goal was, overshadowing any nuance of hand position.

Logically it follows that if you pull the recovery hand out of the water before this finishing snap, you are missing out on the extra propulsion (my opinion).

There was some discussion about keeping the palm back at all times, not getting lazy and rotating the hand at ext.

Hope this helps.
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  #9  
Old 04-08-2012
Golden Rectangle Golden Rectangle is offline
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Default Thanks

Thanks so much for sharing this info. I really appreciate you taking the time to post it. Hopefully he will do another advanced workshop soon, maybe even on the East Coast.
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  #10  
Old 04-08-2012
tomoy tomoy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Rectangle View Post
Thanks so much for sharing this info. I really appreciate you taking the time to post it. Hopefully he will do another advanced workshop soon, maybe even on the East Coast.
Ditto - these are subtle, detailed, useful and a bit new in the discussion of TI.

Thank you!
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