Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Favorite Practices and Sets
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 07-21-2012
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default 5 rounds of 5 x 100 LCM at Ulster County Pool

Wed July 17 2700m at Ulster County Pool

The water was warm and my energy level low so I felt short repeats would be best. I did 5 rounds of 5 x 100 on 2:00, adding a stroke per length (2 strokes per 100m) on each successive round through #4, then reducing SPL for a cool down round at the end. My goals were (1)maintain a sense of ease most of the way; (2) accurately calibrate my Stroke Length - i.e. consistently hit my chosen stroke coin; (3) add as much effortless speed as possible between rounds 1 and 4. This means to go faster more by increasing SPL, than as a result of working harder.

Round 1 @ 37 SPL I descended from 1:53 to 1:45
Round 2 @ 38 SPL I descended from 1:44 to 1:41
Round 3 @ 39 SPL I descended from 1:40 to 1:38
Round 4 @ 40 SPL I descended from 1:37 to 1:33
Round 5 @ 37 SPL I swam with the same effort as I had above, but held a consistent 1:44-1:45.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-21-2012
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default more on periodization - or purposeful variation

Ian's question about training phases refers to a principle or approach espoused in the physiology of training called periodization. This means to plan cycles in training that maximize the body's physiological adaptation to work. There are both macrocycles, which can last for several weeks and micro cycles which refer to the variation over several days.

In truth I do have that sort of variation between easier and more intense efforts, but for the most part it's intuitive, not guided by any research-driven formulas. Some days I have an appetite to do something demanding; other days I'm more in the mood for something meditative or restorative.

I also seek balance in the kind of swimming I do. Because most of my swimming between May and October is in open water - Lake Minnewaska - I tend to swim a lot of distance freestyle during those months. I then seek balance by concentrating a lot more on the other strokes plus individual medley from Nov through Jan. Feb through April I generally mix 'different strokes' with freestyle.

This allows me to set improvement goals of different kinds in three phases each year.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-22-2012
ian mac ian mac is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 194
ian mac
Default Life dictates periodization

Terry,
I am enjoying reading your practices. With 5 children and a busy work schedule, swimming necessarily takes somewhat of a backseat in scheduling.
Being goal oriented, I too have developed a vague periodization schedule: 1) a couple of easy months after provincial or national championships 2) spend the summer in outdoor pools mindfully getting in shape by slowly increasing neural and physiological conditioning 3) 7 months of increasingly specific macro and micro cycles that I will detail in "Formula for a faster 1500.

Thanks for your inspiration this summer as I enjoy all the outdoor pools (one is a peculiar 30 metre pool) while training with my daughter and other "summer swimmers"
ian mac
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-22-2012
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default

Ian
For me it seems my highest priority most summers is to derive as much enjoyment as possible from swimming outdoors, knowing such opportunities are limited for 6 to 8 months of the year. But even when I"m not prioritizing competition or performance I still do most sessions with a high degree of rigor.

It paid off today at Grimaldo's Mile in the ocean at Coney Island. I felt as good from beginning to end as I had in any open water race in 39 years. Placed 14th of 140+ which tells me it was fast for the conditions too. Time was 28:12, just a bit over 2 minutes behind the top finisher, who was in his early 20s.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 07-22-2012
grandall grandall is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 131
grandall
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
Ian
For me it seems my highest priority most summers is to derive as much enjoyment as possible from swimming outdoors, knowing such opportunities are limited for 6 to 8 months of the year. But even when I"m not prioritizing competition or performance I still do most sessions with a high degree of rigor.

It paid off today at Grimaldo's Mile in the ocean at Coney Island. I felt as good from beginning to end as I had in any open water race in 39 years. Placed 14th of 140+ which tells me it was fast for the conditions too. Time was 28:12, just a bit over 2 minutes behind the top finisher, who was in his early 20s.
Great Job Terry on your race today!
__________________
George
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 07-23-2012
ian mac ian mac is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 194
ian mac
Default The joy of a special swim

Terry,
Several things stand out in your last comments. As I too live on the east coast(near Toronto), the unadulterated joy of swimming outdoors always brings joy to my heart. I am invigorated and again feel like that 13 year old pool rat who always seemed to be in the water. If we are lucky we can occasionally feel 13 forever.

I swim with a high degree of vigour and was wondering if you meant that rather than rigor. Although to some extent the level and length of vigour within a practice is often directly proportionate to my short term and long term goals and conditioning, I always have some intensity within every practice. Rigor becomes more important to me during the three months before a major swim because as you well understand, to make those very small adaptations to bring out one's best, takes very exacting and precise work.

More than anything however, I too exult in your having a great race. When they feel as good from beginning to end are always the most special. The great Tunisian swimmer Oussama Mellouli made reference to an "Out of body experience" when referring to Tae Hwan Park's 800 world record.

It feels like that, doesn't it? Those days when the mindfulness, rigor/vigour, good feeling and joy of swimming and communing with the universe all blend together in a special swim.

That's so much of what makes this crazy sport of ours so wonderful - the work toward and then achieving, a special swim. Thank you for sharing.
ian mac
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 07-23-2012
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default TI Swimming Success Algorithm Works Out

As I've written here, since January I've had to exercise care to avoid fatigue in swim training. I can't burn up either meters or heartbeats. Instead I've focused on economy--getting the most payback for every minute of practice and feel:
- streamlined feet and light, compact 2BK,
- drawing energy for my kick mainly from weight shift, very little from quadriceps;
- being able to increase tempo and/or pressure without disturbing the water
After six months of this my water sense feels better-honed than it ever has.

In June, when I began feeling better, I resumed doing regular sets that include my favorite metrics of Tempo, SPL and Time. As reflected in most of the sets I've posted in this thread, my main focus has been on testing my ability to translate faster tempo into faster times -- i.e. hold SPL very consistent as tempo increases. My results on such sets have been far better than at any time since I began using the TI Swimming Success Algorithm (SSA) as my guide in set planning.

My race yesterday in Grimaldo's Mile seems to bear out the efficacy of the SSA. All week I visualized -- and rehearsed - how it would feel to swim with a quick tempo, yet feel relaxed and smooth. It took me about 300m to establish that to my satisfaction, but once I did, I felt locked-in the rest of the way. While my tempo was quite brisk tempo, everything felt in perfect synch, and quite relaxed.

Yesterday's race was the most persuasive experience I've had yet in the superiority of 'hardwiring' over 'conditioning' -- at least for a middle-distance event. My race took 28 minutes yesterday, The Betsy Owens 2-Mile race Aug 11, will take 50+ minutes, providing a bit more of a fitness test.

It was amusing too because the two guys who finished 2nd and 3rd in 60-64 age group yesterday, who have both been pretty good competitors for me over the years, both commented after the race that they feel they'd 'overdone it' in training in recent months.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 07-25-2012
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default 2 'Speed Rules' Broken - or at least cast into Serious Doubt

Tues July 24 - 2400y at Lake Minnewaska
Warmup Cruise 800
Main Set 8 x 200, increasing tempo from 1.02 to .95 (-.01 on each). Count strokes and try to minimize increase.

This was a fairly brief and simple practice -- like most of those I've done this year. On the warmup, my goal was to wire in the same feeling of seamless integration that worked so well for me in Grimaldo's Mile.

On the 8 x 200, I was striving to maintain the same feeling I had during warmup, to imprint it more deeply for the Point Lookout Ocean Mile I'll swim on Long Island next Sunday.
I felt a bit rushed on the first 200 at 1.02, but actually felt more relaxed and smooth as tempo increased. I felt as if I was really optimizing from .97 down.
I monitored SPL by counting breaths -- on the warmup and throughout the set of 200s.
The biggest success in this practice was how consistent my breath, and SPL, count remained. There was a fair bit of wind chop on the lake, which has always slowed me down -- by increasing the number of strokes it took me to cover the 200y distance. But yesterday I took a consistent 52 breaths (156 strokes) per length during my 800 cruise. In previous years I would normally take 170+ strokes in wind chop like that. The difference this year is I feel far more stable in the water, and this has helped keep my feet more streamlined, and my hold on the water much firmer. I feel as if the molecules behind my hand and arm stay quiet, and thus each stroke moves my body forward much better than before.

When I started the set of 200s, with a fairly brisk 1.02 tempo on #1, I felt slightly hurried and it took me 2 more breaths, or 6 more strokes to swim the first. But as I made tempo steadily faster -- 1.01, 1.00, 0.99 -- I could feel myself adapt and my stroke smoothed out a bit. My breath and SPL count stabilized, then actually dropped, as tempo increased. My final 200, at .95, took only 52 breaths, or 156 strokes.

I recalled a similar set I'd done in 2006, the year I set two USMS open water records and was much fitter and -- I thought -- much faster. That was a longer set, 15 x 200, starting at 1.10 and increasing tempo by .01 on each, to .96 on the last 200. In that set I took 172 strokes at that end, and felt I'd done quite well.

Well, 162 strokes, @ .95 tempo, is nearly 10 seconds faster than 172 strokes @ .96. As I was walking back to my car I wondered "How can I possibly be faster this year, when I've trained far less, done almost no speed work, and am about 10 lbs heavier after relative inactivity from Jan through May?"

Then the answer came to me: I've trained myself to move less water when I stroke, and to maintain that firmer grip at progressively higher tempos.
Immediately I grasped the significance of this. Two universally accepted Speed Rules -- that I'd always used to guide my coaching and training -- are the following.
To swim faster you must:
1) generate more power to overcome the greater resistance/drag one faces as speed increases and
2) produce more 'anaerobic' power (energy-metabolism rather than muscular) to continue fueling the muscles at the higher metabolic output required to swim faster and exert that increased power.

These rules simply do not apply . . . if the right conditions are in place.

Why? Because when I DID have more of that sort of fitness in 2006--a year when I devoted myself to a concerted campaign to win titles and break records--more of it was being diverted into moving the water around. This year, when my training was far more modest and gentle, I now move the water around far less, and thus less physiological capacity converts into faster speeds.

PS: In writing this I am in no way dismissing the contribution of fitness and power to maximum performance. If I were younger, fitter, leaner and stronger, as I was in 2006 I would undoubtedly be swimming even faster now. The important point is that there are multiple ways to improve the combination of SPL and Tempo with which you swim. And when you do so -- regardless of fitness or effort -- you swim faster.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 07-25-2012 at 03:05 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 07-25-2012
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Hamburg, Germany
Posts: 787
haschu33
Default

Hi Terry,

this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
...
Why? Because when I DID have more of that sort of fitness in 2006--a year when I devoted myself to a concerted campaign to win titles and break records--more of it was being diverted into moving the water around. This year, when my training was far more modest and gentle, I now move the water around far less, and thus less physiological capacity converts into faster speeds.
is what I love about TI: it gives encouragement (and hope) for people like me who are not really young anymore and will not and cannot devote extra time or even any of their time on increasing their fitness level more than what happens as a by-product of the swim sessions anyway. But still we can find ways to swim fast and efficient, just by mindful practice, and don't become a nuisance in the fast lane of public pools ;-)

What I admire most is the ability of swimming willingly at a certain SPL. I do have some control in a 25m pool, at least I can willingly swim with less or with more strokes given that the result is within a range of a few strokes. In a 50m this becomes guesswork, mainly. A matter of practice I suppose.
Most amazing for me: whenever I swim with the least effort, trying not to 'pull' at all but just gently 'lean' my arm against the water and trying to eliminate all uneccessary muscle movement my SPL is always in my lowest range and I do not get slower although it feels like.
Just amazing.


Hang on in there (no need to tell to you I guess)...
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 07-25-2012
flychick flychick is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Cheltenham, UK
Posts: 86
flychick
Default

Great post Terry and agree with haschu33 that it is always wonderful and inspirational to receive these nuggets of wisdom and encouragement!
I have had some interesting experiences with the tempo trainer in the last few days. One lap of the lake in which I swim is 750m and this is what I discovered:
TT @ 1.20 = 1 lap in 14:40
TT @ 1.25 = 1 lap in 14.20
TT @ 1.28 = 1 lap in 13:29!!!!
I could hardly believe it!! And it felt SO good at the slower SR - just gliding past people! Many lessons for me here, one of which is that, although I can swim shorter distances at a faster TT pace and hold SR I am obviously not yet able maintain this for a longer distance.
At the slower TT pace I felt as if I was more easily able to hold a longer bodyline - this was the key for me I think.
I do find that my times fall off between 10/15 seconds on every subsequent lap at whatever speed I set the TT, so I know that I need to work harder on my consistency.
Nicki

Last edited by flychick : 07-25-2012 at 02:12 PM. Reason: Add info
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.