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  #11  
Old 07-10-2012
terry terry is offline
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Default Nice Progress on 3 x 800 at Minnewaska

July 10 2800 yds at Lake Minnewaska

Tonight I repeated the set of 3 x 800 on 13:00 I'd done on June 24
That night my results were
Tempo-Time-Strokes/Length (200y)
1.15 12:15 159
1.10 12:00 163
1.05 11:47 168

Tonight
1.12 12:25 166
1.08 12:02 167
1.04 11:39 168

The most exciting sign of progress is the very minor change in SPL as I increased tempo. Last time my SPL increased +9 as tempo increased by .1 second. This time my SPL increased only +2 as tempo increased by .08.

This is the key metric on the TI Swimming Success Algorithm. The world's best swimmers are best at keeping Stroke Length consistent as Stroke Rate increases. I did that as well tonight as I've ever done in open water.
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  #12  
Old 07-10-2012
grandall grandall is offline
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Terry,
Thanks for sharing your practice sets. I will be experimenting with these in preperation for my cable swim at Mirror Lake.
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  #13  
Old 07-11-2012
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grandall View Post
in preperation for my cable swim at Mirror Lake.
George
I'll be there too. We usually have a TI swim along the cable on Friday afternoon prior to the race.
See you in Lake Placid,
Terry
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  #14  
Old 07-11-2012
terry terry is offline
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Default 10 x 200 at Ulster County Pool

I swim my second set of 200s in the 50m UCP tonight; previous time was 3 weeks ago. I swam in a slower range of tempos, and did a partial Tempo pyramid. The main value of tonight's practice was in getting more ideas for developing principles and protocols for Bottom End Speed (BES) sets.
Last week I did a series of 100s, seeking my bottom end speed -- the pace, slower than which I won't swim, no matter how easily I go. Last Thurs that was a pace of 1:40 for 100m repeats.

Once you find your BES pace at 100m, one option is to see how long you can maintain it. Can you do so on 150m (or yd) repeats? 200m repeats? I've decided I'll explore BES pace, trying to reach 200,250, 300m repeats at 1:40/100.

Tonight I swam 10 x 200m on 4:00.
I started with tempo at 1.05. It felt rushed so I kept slowing by ,01 each repeat until I felt great mojo.
Tempo went 1.05 . . . to 1.12. I repeated 1.12, then descended to 1.10. I swam 3:30 at 1.05 and descended steadily to 3:20 at 1.10, then slowed to 3:23 on 1.12 and regained a bit of time as I came back to 1.10. I'll experiment some more with 200m repeats to see if I can find the tempo where I can swim 3:20 - same pace as my BES 100s - effortlessly.

The water has gotten quite warm, so that will make it more of a challenge.
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  #15  
Old 07-11-2012
ian mac ian mac is offline
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ian mac
Default Huh?

Terry,
Forgive my ignorance regarding BES. How does one determine it. How is it relevant to an overall phase oriented training program? Is it best used during early season LSD type swimming? How much of an overall % of total swimming should be focused on this and why. As always, I remain curious.
ian mac
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  #16  
Old 07-16-2012
terry terry is offline
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Ian
I don't do a formal phase-oriented training program. If I'm pointing for a Nationals, I may intensify my efforts for 10 weeks or so prior. But for the most part I just find metrics to work on every day and try to make them better in the course of my hour of swimming. Phase-oriented training is intended to produce a physiological adaptation. But I'm always in pursuit of neural adaptation, letting the physiological stuff just be a factor of the neural changes.
I determine my personal BES experimentally/experientially, by doing sets such as I outlined. I do think it could be used to good effect in any practice or phase in which you wished to keep the metabolic demands moderate.
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  #17  
Old 07-16-2012
terry terry is offline
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Default 4 x 400 Faster Tempo at Minnewaska

Last Saturday I swam a Masters meet at Ithaca College's 50m pool. I was there mainly to see friends enjoy the atmosphere and test how well I would hold up under some brisk -- even intense -- efforts.
I surprised myself a bit in the 800m, going 12:10 - a nice improvement over the 12:36 I did in June 2011 at Middlebury College when I was fairly well trained -- however I did swim a 1500 prior to that.
My 200m splits were 3:03-3:05-3:05-2:56. I was feeling some fatigue at 600m so I was very happy with that final 200.
My next event was 200 IM I cruised a bit too much, going 3:54. So I made it my goal for my 3rd event, the 400 IM, to swim faster than twice my 200m time -- or 7:48, I felt so good that my face was splitting with a smile during breaststroke and felt even better when I finished and saw my time was 7:34. I was pleased because I've barely swum a stroke of anything but freestyle this year.
My next event will be Grimaldo's Ocean Mile at Coney Island next Sunday.

Today I swam an easy mile with TI Director of Customer and Coach Services Angela Dorris, then did 4 x 400 with Tempo. This was an excellent set, especially considering there was a strong wind blowing today which made the water fairly choppy.
Tempo Time SPL (per 200y length)
1.08 6:10 175
1.04 5:59 173
1.00 5:50 175
0.96 5:42 178

Again, this was a very satisfying set, because I did a very good job of converting increases in tempo into increases in speed. My stroke efficiency actually improved as I advanced tempo from 1.08 to 1.04. It was the same at 1.00 as at 1.08 and I added only 3 strokes over 200y at 0.96. So my tempo Sweet Spot has gotten nearly a tenth of a second faster in the past month.
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  #18  
Old 07-19-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
Last Saturday I swam a Masters meet at Ithaca College's 50m pool. I was there mainly to see friends enjoy the atmosphere and test how well I would hold up under some brisk -- even intense -- efforts.
I surprised myself a bit in the 800m, going 12:10 - a nice improvement over the 12:36 I did in June 2011 at Middlebury College when I was fairly well trained -- however I did swim a 1500 prior to that.
My 200m splits were 3:03-3:05-3:05-2:56. I was feeling some fatigue at 600m so I was very happy with that final 200.
My next event was 200 IM I cruised a bit too much, going 3:54. So I made it my goal for my 3rd event, the 400 IM, to swim faster than twice my 200m time -- or 7:48, I felt so good that my face was splitting with a smile during breaststroke and felt even better when I finished and saw my time was 7:34. I was pleased because I've barely swum a stroke of anything but freestyle this year.
Fantastic swim and great splits. Love the smiling while you are swimming 400m IM
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  #19  
Old 07-19-2012
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
Ian
I don't do a formal phase-oriented training program. If I'm pointing for a Nationals, I may intensify my efforts for 10 weeks or so prior. But for the most part I just find metrics to work on every day and try to make them better in the course of my hour of swimming. Phase-oriented training is intended to produce a physiological adaptation. But I'm always in pursuit of neural adaptation, letting the physiological stuff just be a factor of the neural changes.
I determine my personal BES experimentally/experientially, by doing sets such as I outlined. I do think it could be used to good effect in any practice or phase in which you wished to keep the metabolic demands moderate.
These two approaches physiologic adaptation vs. neurologic adaptation, are clearly intricately linked in the body. But the priority given for training is what makes Terry's approach unique compared to "conventional" approaches in swimming. By "hand me down" tradition, then physiologic approaches used in traditional swimming are far, far more complicated than those commonly or traditionally used in cycling or running or x-country skiing for example.

Making the neurological aspect a priority at all points of training ensures that "Sp1/Sp2", "lactic acid" or "Vo2" sets do not degenerate into energy wasted...it's easy to generate lactate, consume large amounts of oxygen and get your HR up high in swimming without any guaranteed improvement in your swim.

But if one combines a physiologic periodized approach (ie increasing my VO2 at this point in the year will help me swim faster) then you can prioritize neurologically demanding sets that span a time range of 3-6 minutes for example.

JUST swimming 5 minute hard repeats won't do it...But swimming a distance you typically cover in 5 minutes at your best SR /Tempo combination...knowing what they are , maintaining them and being aware of if/when they DO break down...can make for a killer combination for peaking performance...combining fitness and efficiency together in the smartest way possible.
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Coach of 4 time USA Triathlon Triathlete of the Year, Kirsten Sass
Steel City Endurance, LTD
Fresh Freestyle

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  #20  
Old 07-19-2012
terry terry is offline
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Suzanne
Thanks for adding valuable perspective to what had been a hurried and somewhat incomplete response by me to Ian's question. To give a bit more depth, I've become a full-on addict of the principle or attitude that the essential goal of every practice should be to improve your swimming.

If my orientation is physiological, I would never be able to satisfy myself that, indeed I had improved. Or even to set up a feedback loop that let me know if I had. Because improving any metabolic metric takes weeks or months. And they can only be measured in the lab.

With a neural orientation, I have clear measures of improvement -- on every length or repeat, not just at the end of practice. I do include some phase-like planning or thinking when I've set a high level goal, but 80-90% of the time I'm swimming for physical and emotional well-being and in pursuit of Flow States.

My phases are extremely simple. If I've marked out three to four months for more focused preparation, I'll devote the first 25% mainly to improvements in 'cell-level' efficiency, by which I mean neurons -- for both awareness and motor control. After that I'll aim to do perhaps two 30-minute sets per week that are based on combinations of SPL, Tempo and Duration that are just beyond my current Neural Threshold. All the rest of my swimming is to recover from the last such set and prepare for the next. Generally this means slower tempos but longer strokes, with exceeding gentleness.

This is how I trained as I turned 55 in the spring of 2006 prior to swimming times at Masters Zones and Nationals that were faster than I'd swum in 13 years -- and in the summer when I went on a spree of winning national titles and breaking 55-59 age group records.
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Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 07-19-2012 at 09:05 PM.
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