Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 07-23-2009
atreides atreides is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 293
atreides
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shuumai View Post
The overall amount of water shouldn't make a difference. One can float in a bath tub. (Though, at some small level, I wonder if there is a difference. If so, perhaps even the angle of the walls could have a small effect.)
My point is that the shallower the pool and therefore the smaller the amount of water, the lower an object will sink. Think of this way. Everything else being equal, why do you float better in a 6X6X4 pool than a 6X6X3 pool and even better in a 6X6X10 pool. Well there is 108 cubic ft of water pushing against you in the 3 ft deep pool versus 144 cubic ft of water in the 4 ft pool and 360 cubic ft in the 10 ft pool. That's why Elskbrev felt more buoyant in the 10 ft pool than he did in the 4 ft pool. He didn't sink as much in the 10 ft pool because it probably had a lot more water.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-23-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,077
shuumai
Send a message via Skype™ to shuumai
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by atreides View Post
My point is that the shallower the pool and therefore the smaller the amount of water, the lower an object will sink. Think of this way. Everything else being equal, why do you float better in a 6X6X4 pool than a 6X6X3 pool and even better in a 6X6X10 pool. Well there is 108 cubic ft of water pushing against you in the 3 ft deep pool versus 144 cubic ft of water in the 4 ft pool and 360 cubic ft in the 10 ft pool. That's why Elskbrev felt more buoyant in the 10 ft pool than he did in the 4 ft pool. He didn't sink as much in the 10 ft pool because it probably had a lot more water.
Nope. If that were the case, people would float on the surface of an ocean. As long as there is enough water to fully surround your body, you will float if your body weighs less than the water it displaces.

If a ship floats in the ocean it will also float in the Panama Canal if it will fit in the lock.

Buoyancy seeming greater in deep water is a psychological reaction.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-24-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 201
RadSwim
Default

Archimedes' principle. The depth of the water does not enter into the equation. The water only needs to be deep enough to allow the bouyant object (in this case, the swimmer) to reach equilibrium.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archime...s.27_principle

Physics is wonderful -- it dispels magical thinking.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 07-24-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,077
shuumai
Send a message via Skype™ to shuumai
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RadSwim View Post
Physics is wonderful -- it dispels magical thinking.
Well...seeing the "magic" in things is also useful. Think "beginner's mind."
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-21-2013
Nicodemus Nicodemus is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 50
Nicodemus
Default

I just stumbled on this thread. I know it's a good few years old, but feel I have to reply for the benefit of anyone else asking the same question...

So - the original question was why do tense muscles make you sink, or don't they?

Answer - they don't. It's a complete fallacy. (Like so many myths in swimming).

Moral - don't believe everything you're told or read about swimming (which I would hope TI practitioners wouldn't!)
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.