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  #1  
Old 07-08-2010
RogerL RogerL is offline
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RogerL
Default why is 100% nose exhaling best?

My first exposure to TI was in 2003 when Terry's philosophy was:

"Breathing Basics
Let's start with the mechanics of getting air into your lungs, "while wet": Inhale through the mouth. Exhale 70% from the mouth and 30% through your nose. Are these exact figures? No, I just use them to represent a general sense that, while you can exhale more fully from your mouth, you also need to have enough air pressure coming from your nose to keep the water from invading."

After a 6 year gap in learning the TI way I have just bought the O2 in H20 DVD and see that Terry is now advocating 100% exhaling through the nose.

I guess this has been discussed a lot in the last 6 years - I would appreciate it if someone could give me a summary of the reasons.
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  #2  
Old 07-09-2010
daveblt daveblt is offline
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I have all the most recent dvds except for the 02 in h2o ,is that what Terry actually mentioned in the video ? The reason I'm asking is because I have never heard or seen any posts that say through the nose 100%. That would mean to keep your lips tightly closed as you exhale under water. The thought is to bubble steadily from the nose so probably most is coming from the nose but also keep the lips parted somewhat so some air is also coming out of the mouth. I would never swim with my lips closed . A closed mouth also will mean being more tense.

Dave

Last edited by daveblt : 07-09-2010 at 08:30 PM.
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  #3  
Old 07-09-2010
RogerL RogerL is offline
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daveblt, He doesn't actually say 100%, simply "exhale through your nose".

I think your statement that "to acheive 100% through the nose would mean to keep your lips tightly closed as you exhale under water" is incorrect.

Exhalling through my nose with my hand shielding a very fine feather in front of my open mouth produces no movement of the feather. But even if there was a little air coming out of the mouth on land, to produce bubbles under water it would have to be sufficiently forceful to overcome the water pressure.

There are many shots of Terry underwater in the O2 in H20 DVD with his mouth open with bubbles ONLY coming from his nose.

Roger

Last edited by RogerL : 07-09-2010 at 10:07 PM.
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  #4  
Old 07-11-2010
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Mike from NS
Default my $0.2 (Canadian) worth

I found that with the mouth already slightly open that when I come "up" for air, it is easier to get air more quickly than if I have to wait to open my mouth and then breathe. Something I'm working on that I hope will make breathing easier and more flowing with everything else that is happening at the same time. It also helps induce some relaxation.

(Watch out for the St. Louis centre of the road huge puddles Pat! They may be sink holes!!)

Mike
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  #5  
Old 07-11-2010
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Mike from NS
Default progress can be amazing .... slow ~ but amazing none-the-less!

Pat ... a student needs a teacher who can understand the concerns of the student. I think I have always said that you have this ability.

I am beyond panic attacks BUT that depends on the situation... if on a plane landing in the Hudson River I may be forced to panic....

Deep water safe ? Let's say safer; much, much safer. Going to the bottom of a 12ft deep end is not a big deal now.... it does bring about sinus pain however - another story. Jumping off a diving board into the same water would be a big deal. (Next winter's goal!) I'm very comfortable swimming breast stroke along the bottom of the pool for as long as I can hold my breath ... maybe 20 - 25 feet.

Skills to survive the deep end ? Tell me what the skills are and I'll tell you if I think I have them.

I'm not depending on the lifeguard to save me; but I'm glad they're there just in case. Always, they are friendly people to speak with on my way into or from the pool.

I agree, and always have agreed .. swimming is no place for dare devils. I know of too many certified divers who got into trouble or died.

Here's my present status Pat. I have two obvious issues to overcome and overcoming these will increase confidence greatly. Even the past week has given positive results in this direction. The issues ... (1)still need to be more relaxed for consistent breathing; and (2)I have too great a reliance on fins. With the fins on I am able to do a 25 meter length with bi-lateral breathing. I know that with the fins I will generate forward momentum and, mentally all is good should the arms stop working. Silly? Probably! Knowing my "flutter kick" is completely useless, without the fins I stay where I can stand. Swimming fin-less works well (2 BK etc...)however I have to build confidence before going into water deeper than 6 feet. In the past week I have found much better balance and streamlined state. These have all but eliminated my problems of breathing to the right ~ which was hit & miss. All that I've changed was focusing on a longer and complete stroke while keeping the other arm stretched out long and still. Of these issues the fin reliance is the greater. Breathing is coming along. What can you suggest to help me build confidence and thus get over this reliance on the fins?

When I saw the news this morning of the car in the sink hole in St Louis, I immediately thought of you ... I know no-one else in St Louis! I'm glad it wasn't you !
Take care,
Mike
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  #6  
Old 07-12-2010
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Mike from NS
Default Thanks Pat...

Thanks Pat for your reply.

Though my progress has been slow, it has been solid. It has come from the wise words from you and this forum which I have put into practice and then have learned from doing. I'm not holding my breath as much as I may have indicated. As a breathing exercise apart from swim & nod etc. I flutter down the pool on my back while bobbing beneath the surface and sculling my hands to pull me deeper. This has helped me with timing of the breath and so on.
A friend has pointed out things to improve stroke and the change has been amazing. It is a matter of building confidence that will free me from my fins. Terry said quite some time ago, something to the effect, that my flutter kick will be replaced with the 2BK so not to worry too much about it. The 2BK works quite well for me; but inexperience is the first cousin to lacking confidence. If I were to fall out of a boat I would want my fins sooner than a life jacket. I think, if there is no standard remedy, then I hope practice & more practice will bvring about my "freedom".

Thanks a lot!
Mike
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  #7  
Old 07-20-2010
CoachIan CoachIan is offline
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Hi Roger,

This is dead simple really. “In through the mouth, Out through the nose”. It's the only way to go when it comes to aquatic breathing (unless there’s a physiological reason why you can’t do it).

It's all about control. The nose is habitually used for breathing, being a bi-directional valve. But as soon as your face goes into the water you will automatically close it off to make sure nothing goes up the wrong way. That's just the air pressure in the nose balancing off the external water pressure, so if you make that internal pressure slightly higher you get bubbles escaping and all is well, because then you are not ever breath holding (which is really bad to do).

Then as you come round through the surface strongly exhale though the nose and follow up with an inhale though a nice wide open mouth to top up your lungs. The idea is to get the breathing to be as normal as possible for the intensity level of the work you are doing. Think about how you would breathe jogging along at a nice easy pace and that's pretty much how you would want to be breathing when swimming for distance.

No reason at all to clamp the mouth tight shut, hey most of the time your mouth is closed naturally, it's pretty used to opening and closing for you. But its just not easy to control the rate of exhale out of the mouth and its really easy to over breath and to shallow breath too, neither is good.

Hope this helps.

Ian
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  #8  
Old 07-20-2010
ewa.swimmer ewa.swimmer is offline
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While swimming this morning (OW) I experimented with nose vs. mouth breathing. I breathe every 3 strokes (bilateral). I usually swim with my mouth relaxed and open. I tried breathing out through my nose and found that I had to force the air out to get enough out before my next breath. I'll stay with being an almost 100% mouth breather. I can swim 7K this way without feeling out of breath.
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