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  #1  
Old 08-07-2010
millertime millertime is offline
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millertime
Default treading water - total immersion style?

Are there any TI teachings on treading water? I'm in trouble when I need to stop swimming in the middle of a lap and I happen to be in the deep end...
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  #2  
Old 08-08-2010
naj naj is offline
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Default How to tread water

Quote:
Originally Posted by millertime View Post
Are there any TI teachings on treading water? I'm in trouble when I need to stop swimming in the middle of a lap and I happen to be in the deep end...
Lesson #234 of why you should swim in open water, treading water is easier in salt water because your more buoyant! Millertime, if you are tuckered out after a lap or two, just grab onto the wall in the corner and let others pass you if they wish to continue. This is considered good pool etiquette. But if you want to learn to tread water in the pool (and its a good idea to do so), then check out this video. Admittedly the woman on the video is speaking rather fast but it is a good instructional video.

Best!
Naji
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  #3  
Old 08-08-2010
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Here's a video on the eggbeater kick as used by water polo players. It's somewhat similar to breaststroke kick but one leg at a time. A good workout for the leg muscles, too.

The sculling motion with the arms is also useful and if you can do a vertical float is sufficient to keep the head above the water without any kicking action.

If you can do a dolphin kick this can be used too, as can the flutter kick used in crawl ( front and back).

Practicing these will bring other useful benefits as well as allowing you to rest mid-pool.

Eggbeater is probably the least restful of these, though.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXk-Z...eature=related
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  #4  
Old 08-08-2010
casual_swimmer casual_swimmer is offline
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I don't find treading water particularly energy efficient. When I get tired or out of breath in a middle of a lap or my stroke stops being excellent I roll to sweet spot or do some backstroke to get my breath back.

Hope this helps!
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Old 08-08-2010
ames ames is offline
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ames
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Interesting question. You should definitely learn how to roll over and float on your back before going in the deep end. You can kick gently in sweet spot until you catch your breath.

I am not very good at treading water either and would love to hear of more "TI-style" ways to do it. It seems to be an area where the TI approach would be applicable, since the way it is traditionally done is so exhausting, when it shouldn't be, since all you're doing is keeping yourself up to breathe, you're not even moving forward. Do I see the next video, "Easy Tread for Everybody"?

ames
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  #6  
Old 08-08-2010
naj naj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by splashingpat View Post
Yeah IT'S CALLED THE BACK STROKE, and It's clue that ya can't travel in the prone position!
P.S. casual chatting & I see some I could give some great lessons to
nice post and insite TOO!
Correct me if I'm wrong but didn't this person say that they were in a pool? If so, then wouldn't it be more prudent for him to be off to the side, not getting in other lane partners way? Lying on his back will only create a hindrance for others in his lane - depending on how big the lane is.

Backstroke is a great stroke to learn for ease and TI backstroke is very good, but learning to tread water is a wise thing to learn and he can do it with a scissor kick, eggbeater, or vertical kick which Coach Fiona Laughlin showed us at a TI workshop I attended. Can it be exhausting? You bet it can if you tense up during it it will get exhausting very quickly, but I've found that have a relaxed kick in treading water is just as important as it is in freestyle. This is just my thought on the topic I'm sure there are others with more sage advice.

Keep Swimming!
Naji
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  #7  
Old 08-08-2010
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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If you find treading water too exhausting then vertical floating is the answer. You usually have to lean your head back a bit to get your mouth clear and if you find you are sinking too much a tiny scull or kick will bring your mouth clear. If you can't float upright you probably shouldn't be venturing into deep water.
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Old 08-08-2010
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hi Pat

Still swimming, still trying to improve - and still improving in some areas at least. Still appreciating feminine beauty in all forms, especially as demonstrated by wonderful swimmers, old and young. I fear I still bore my family and possibly others too with my enthusiasm for swimming

I haven't had a very good couple of years from the time improvement point of view due to various vicissitudes, but I'm working on it and hoping for some new best times next year.

In answer to your final question, sometimes I understand your posts and sometimes I don't. A bit like you with mine, I think.

I still sometimes try 'row, row, row your boat' to get the right rhythm for backstroke. It's nearly as good as a tempo trainer and it's free.
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  #9  
Old 08-09-2010
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
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Mike from NS
Default My $ .02 worth - but it's Canadian!

Millertime;

Pat urges caution in the deep water and I agree. She has seen her share of scary moments there. Her suggestion to stay out of there until you have the skills is her life-guarding experience talking and her concern for the fate of the unqualified who venture there.

Your question was asked here a few years ago. The first answer was to the effect ... "why would you want to tread water in the first place?" The Russel Pat mentioned and myself replied ~ because having a treading skill would help with water safety and confidence.

Richard mentions the Eggbeater kick. How to do the eggbeater kick was my first ever question here. I think it is very difficult to learn though very effective if you are co-ordinated and can master it. Trying it I really messed up a knee. Be careful with that one ~ don't over do it as I did.

The TI videos suggest Vertical Kicking in combination with hand sculling as a form of treading water. The vertical kick is the same as a flutter kick but done while you're vertical in the water. But to be vertical in the water with toes pointed and ready to kick ~ from the hip, with straight leg ~ requires you to be in slightly deeper water than you can stand in while being comfortably able to breathe. Chicken & egg .... keep out of deep water until you have the skills but you kind of need some "over the head" deep water to learn the skill. Hmmmmm ... Pat how do we handle this?

Millertime .. I went to the fins since my kick was useless. The fins were a great help in general and in helping to learn the vertical kick but -- be careful here too. You may become dependant on the fins ... I did. Some years later I am just gaining some fin-free swimming. With fins in the "just a bit too deep" water vertical kicking with some sculling will afford you some confidence and begin you swimming skill set. A salt water pool will give you lots of good feelings of skill gaining due to the buoyant effects of the salt water. Maybe a flotation belt, which the better pools have available, may be the way to go as well. No shame in using the belt ... it is a safety device!

Pat mentioned "drown proofing". Google this for lots of further info. Basically drown~proofing is the skill of being able to remain still and relaxed in an almost leaning forward sitting position in the water such that you are able to lift your head just enough to clear the water for a quick breath. No sculling or kicking involved. You just have to learn where you can balance and float with the mouth near the water surface - ready to get a breath. I'm sure there are many drown-proofing techniques; but this is the one I was shown. Since your legs are slightly drawn up for this, it can be easily practised in shallow water where you can stand for air if need be. The "trick" is to try to remain as balanced and as still as possible.

Good luck and realize this --- it is all practise and building confidence that will make you safe. Sorry I went on so long........
Mike
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Last edited by Mike from NS : 08-09-2010 at 12:58 AM.
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