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Old 05-29-2010
324 324 is offline
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Default The most energy

Did you know that breastroke uses the most energy even more then butterfly.
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Old 05-30-2010
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 324 View Post
Did you know that breastroke uses the most energy even more then butterfly.



Maybe for some but for me breaststroke is a lot easier than butterfly

Dave
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Old 05-30-2010
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Same here but I've been swimming breaststroke for over fifty years and have never managed to swim a decent butterfly. No doubt if I'd learnt butterfly as a kid I would now use less energy swimming it.
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Old 05-30-2010
terry terry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 324 View Post
Did you know that breastroke uses the most energy even more then butterfly.
Energy cost really depends on how you swim - either stroke. Energy cost will be lowest in both strokes when you do the following:
1) Focus most on doing what it takes to put your body in a streamlined position at the conclusion of each stroke. (As opposed to propelling via pull and kick.) "Streamlined" means elongated and sleek, with head hanging between shoulders.
2) Spend more time in that streamlined position, most of it below the surface. Spend less time in any non-streamlined position. We're talking about nanosecond adjustments here, but small changes in timing make a big difference.
3) While you focus on holding a streamlined position, let gravity take you down . . . until you feel buoyancy has become the stronger force. Let buoyancy return you to the surface. This is far more economical than diving-and-climbing.
4) Start the next stroke just as you feel buoyancy - working mainly without much help from you - is about to take you back through the surface. Do just enough with your hands to help your head clear the surface for a breath.
5) About that breath: Keep your head as stable and neutral as possible - and your chin in the water - as you breathe.

Again, this is advice for both strokes.

You can find a lot more detail and step-by-step suggestions for building skill, speed and endurance (by which I mean the distance you can swim WITHOUT fatigue) in the book Extraordinary Swimming.

For visual aids, there are the DVDs BetterFlyfor Every Body and Breaststroke for Every Body.
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Last edited by terry : 05-30-2010 at 02:36 PM.
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