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  #11  
Old 11-13-2009
JohanWJoubert JohanWJoubert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodbldr View Post
I do not have any trouble when I do drills, only when I begin to put everything together. I watched the breathing lessons in the Easy Freestyle video and I read the recent thread by Nicodemus... My questions are if this is "normal" for a beginning swimmer, or am I expecting too much too soon?
Danny
I can sympathize!

The TI bug bit me only 4 months ago, and big was my disappointment when I kept "falling apart" like many have mentioned. I too read and read forum posts, tried everything I could find, but remain exhausted and out of breath.

This is what eventually started working for me:

In my case, I realized that I started to roll towards air much too late. My recovering hand was already nearly stretched - I think I unconsciously waited for that "stretched" feeling to naturally force my body into the roll. This late roll resulted in an uneven stroke (because I NEEDED the air!) and still being out of breath.

With deliberate attention, I then tried to start roll with my core as soon as my recovery hand entered the water. This gave me much more time to breath, relaxing me.

And, once relaxed, and could start focus on other areas to improve my stroke. I have a LOT to improve on still, but can swim at 21-23 SPL for close to a mile now. Maybe my "aha" can help you.
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  #12  
Old 11-13-2009
elk-tamer elk-tamer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohanWJoubert View Post

In my case, I realized that I started to roll towards air much too late. My recovering hand was already nearly stretched - I think I unconsciously waited for that "stretched" feeling to naturally force my body into the roll. This late roll resulted in an uneven stroke (because I NEEDED the air!) and still being out of breath.

With deliberate attention, I then tried to start roll with my core as soon as my recovery hand entered the water. This gave me much more time to breath, relaxing me.
That's a good explanation. I've been focusing on stopping the breath earlier, which sounds strange but seems to work. It seems like the coordinating the breath is a common problem for our ilk.
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  #13  
Old 02-27-2010
garybarg garybarg is offline
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Default Breathing, what else

This forum has been so helpful to me. I thank all of you for your comments - lots of useful tips, lots of reinforcement for me to see others having the same issues.

For me, a few notables:
1. I stopped giving myself time limits to learn a particular skill. Now, I try to just let it come. I've been working this for over a year now and am just getting to feel comfortable with the breathing.
2. Try mixing it up a little, have fun - do somersaults, walk on my hands, always trying to leave the pool with something that is totally fun.
3. Using whatever tools i need to for help. The most important thing for me is to feel comfortable and relaxed in the water. I'm very lean, so I am a sinker - so, I wear a sleeveless neopene vest, very light wt, but it took my mind off being a sinker. Guess what, I have gotten to the point of good balance now and do not need the vest any more. Also, vest keeps me from getting cold and cold/swimming not a good combo, at least for me. Cannot relax if cold
4. I practice breathing on land, just walking around. At a minimum, it makes me more mindful of how I breathe. I take a quick bite, then exhale for 4, 6, or 8 paces, try to be mindful of how I am working the breathing and of any discomfort. One thing I have discovered that the mere fact of a bite of breath, vs the long inhale I do normally, creates some discomfort. Interesting fact for me, not quite sure what to do with it, but I think getting used to it is the big thing.
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  #14  
Old 02-27-2010
naj naj is offline
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naj
Default Naj has a sex change operation...hey wait a minute!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from NS View Post
Some things come more easily to some people than to others. Look at Naj in the Open Water thread. She started swimming a year ago and now is loving the cold open waters and looking at great distances.

Mike
Thanks for the compliment Mike but I'm actually a guy :) But your right, breathing takes time, Danny. Remember water is 800 times more dense than air and like Shuumai said there is a rhythm to breathing in water that we take for granted on land. One thing that may help you is to expel all the Co2 out of your lungs prior to taking the next breath. It might seem strange to do so, but it will help with not getting out of breath for the second one. IT takes a bit of getting use to but your getting good advice from folks on this thread. And like my buddy Mike said, I learned to swim when I was 43 and like you I am now 45. The cool thing about open water swimming is that many who have accomplished great things in open water learned as adults!

Keep Swimming!
Naji
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  #15  
Old 11-06-2010
piyavat piyavat is offline
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Default Breathing

My problem is the bloated stomach! When I started from the wall, I could relax and swim (visualized to be effortless) with breathing every 4 strokes until I got to about 22 yards. There I struggled B/C I did not have enough air and choked. Breathing air in through my mouth brought a lot of gas into the stomach. When I rested at the walll, I had to burb to empty out the gas. Then started the next lap.

I did not ask my great TI instructor, Master Kevin, this question months ago in a workshop b/c I just thought about this problem yesterday. Kevin knows I'm fit as I still give Muay Thai training to people in this small town 15-20 hours a week. Oh, well, when I do that the breathing flow is in reverse, in by nose and out by mouth. So, no problem. Thanks for your help! Piyavat Napatalung
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  #16  
Old 11-06-2010
quad09 quad09 is offline
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quad09
Default Lat & Shoulder Development

Woodbldr over time you have developed great legs and aerobic capacity while running and cycling. However, your shoulders and lats have kind of been sitting on the sideline in a supportive role. An efficeint pull puts great demand on these two muscle groups and could be contributing to your struggle. My opinion is that no matter how effective your aerobic capacity might be, if you don't have a matching muscle development you're going to come up short. Proper breathing technique (or artistry) is crucial and must be developed as well!!!

Best of luck:)

PS/ When you go to a tri event Naj is very is to spot, she's the only one swimming topless!!! Sorry i couldn't pass it up.

Last edited by quad09 : 11-06-2010 at 04:58 PM.
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  #17  
Old 11-06-2010
jmsavi jmsavi is offline
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jmsavi
Default The same struggle

jmsavi-male,50yr old, norcal (thought it might be a good idea to get that out of the way(but with much respect Naj)) :)
I am struggling with the exact same thing Woodbldr and have spent many hours ready posts and watching videos of Terry and Shinji trying to figure out what is going wrong when I breath durring whole stroke.When I watch videos of Terry or Shinji the breath seems to happen so quickly its difficult to see the actual mechanics.In fact on Shinji's demo, when they show the head-on, above water shot it's difficult to tell when he takes a breath(truly art in motion).I found that if I'm having a problem on the stroke following my breathing stroke its because of not rotating enough, but this is a "beginners self analysis" and correcting this seems to be a challenge for me.
I think O2 IN H2O is agood idea and is going to be my next purchase.I also have a lesson coming up next week and I'll repost after I get a masters opinion.
Swim long and prosper \\// and welcome to the club
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  #18  
Old 11-10-2010
jmsavi jmsavi is offline
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Hey woodbldr,
I was hoping I was going to have something profound to share about breathing durring whole stroke after my first lesson, but my lesson didn't really get that far.
After watching me swim a few laps, my coach had me start at square one.This doesn't mean I didn't learn anything that would help me with breathing (I do understand that it is "one long chain of events and if there is a problem with one link the entire chain is compromised to some extent"),I just didn't get to work on any specific breathing drills.
I f I can add anything, it would be how important it is to have a TI buddy, or coach or other TI forum swimmers take a look at your stroke or even have yourself filmed so you can see exactly whats going on.I did see a good link by the stroke doctor on one of the other breathing forums.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LqqNO3WYZ0
This was posted by mjm.It's worth checking out, if you haven't already. And don't forget to chime in with any new insights.
Swim long and prosper\\//
jmsavi
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