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  #1  
Old 07-04-2015
Talvi Talvi is offline
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Default "Scottish" Lanes?

In the Outer Hebrides, "lane swimming" is provided for by combining lanes in the pool and swimmers swimming clcockwise circuits of the resulting area i.e up one side, across the end, down the other side, across the end, etc.

Of course any sort of turn, open or tumble gives riae to collisions, and effectively only 25m intervals are possible. I found it bizzarre to say the least.

Has anyone swum in any pools outside of Scotland where this approach is taken? Or perhaps the approach is limited to the Outer Hebrides.
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  #2  
Old 07-04-2015
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
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Hello Talvi,

in Hamburg's swimmer's lanes it's obligate to swim "circles", but we swim counter clockwise...

In the SCM pool there's only a single lane and you can forget continues swims if more than four swimmers in.

In the LCM pool there are doubled laps and it's possible to swim relatively continues for up to 10-12 swimmers. Exact pauses to fit in again are the major Problem here. Public, "Tempo" swimmers and BS have their own doubled lanes.

I've once swam in a SCM in Düsseldorf there were two laps for swimmers with cable in the middle where we could swim around as (short) cable swimming in USA. (Also counter clockWise, so clockwise swimming might be a Scottish specialty...)

Best regards,
Werner
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  #3  
Old 07-05-2015
Talvi Talvi is offline
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Hi Werner

It may help here if I clarify/expand on the difference between what I called swimming in circles and swimming in clockwise/counter-clockwise traffic flows.

In Finland we swim in 2.5m wide lanes each separated from the other by a lane rope. Each of these lanes is then notionaly divided by the swimmers into two 1.2m wide tracks, around the lane marker line on the bottom of the pool, and swimmers swim in a counter-clockwise flow, up one side of each lane and down the other, turning on the wall "T" in close to a normal manner. No swimming across the end of these lanes is needed or possible and this is the key difference to the Scottish "lanes" system.

The offer of "lane swimming" in Scotland is made by removing lane ropes so that lanes become combined. Swimmers are obliged to swim in a circle, clockwise, in these larger areas so it is not possible to turn in a normal manner at the end as there is a 5m+ width to cross before you are able to swim back in the opposite direction. Slow breastroke swimmers manage to keep swimming all around the circular path but freestylers have to either stop and shuffle across the ends before doing another lap, making swimming more than 25m at a time impossible, or else come off the wall at an angle, with the attendant risks of collision etc.

Lanes are combined in Finland too, but only for vesijuoksu (water-running) and other water based exercise, not for lane swimming.
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A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
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"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
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Old 07-05-2015
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
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Hello Talvi,

think now I understand. That I rembember was strict rule in a spa. It's for bath; no room for what we call swimming....

Best regards,
Werner

PS: ... they "swam" counterclockwise... :-)
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Old 07-05-2015
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hello

In the pool I swim in, a four-lane 25m pool near Aberystwyth, Wales, when the pool is set up for lane swimming, the lanes are designated as fast, medium, medium, and slow, but all these seem rather nebulous concepts and open to interpretation.There is no lane police. By skilful timing of my departures, I can usually fit in with the 'fast' swimmers, most of whom are considerably faster than I am. Sometimes the first medium lane is also occupied by fastish swimmers.The lanes alternate between clockwise and anti-clockwise, so that swimmers are not coming in opposite directions on either side of a lane line, thus avoiding bow-wave problems. Collisions are rare but not unknown, more commonly knuckle contact as two swimmers pass in opposite directions. This can be painful but not life-threatening. Butterfly and backstroke are best practised at the end of the session, when traffic thins out considerably.At weekends there is often a lane at one side of the pool for swimmers who wish to swim continuously or swim intervals. Often there are huge discrepancies in pace between the various inhabitants of the lane, which makes for variety, and sometimes frustration, but usually works out quite well.
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Old 07-05-2015
Talvi Talvi is offline
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So, Wales also seems no exception to the general practice of lane swimming. I think the "spa" approach as Werner called it might then be just a Scottish interpretation.

That alternating direction of rotation between the lanes sounds neat, though I've only noticed the problem of wake from the next lane when the club swimmers start to get up a head of steam or swim butterfly. I find the lane ropes catch most of it. I do find passing swimmers in my lane who are swimming in the opposite direction affects breathing to the left (in counter-clockwise rotation) but I've begun to be able to sense when the swimmer is coming and then I just breathe to the right for a stroke.
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A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
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"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
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  #7  
Old 07-13-2015
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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Kitsilano pool in Vancouver (British Columbia) has a lane swim that is run this way. It's 137 metres long, so flip turns probably wouldn't make much of a difference anyway.
The best way to do a rectangular turn around a lane like this is probably to practice buoy turns. (Flip onto back, take one stroke, flip around to front again.)
I think I've swum in a pool in the south of England that also had this sort of setup for lane swimming.

Last edited by Rhoda : 07-16-2015 at 10:00 PM.
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  #8  
Old 07-16-2015
Talvi Talvi is offline
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Not familiar with buoy turns.
__________________
A psychological disorder is: "Any personal construction which is used repeatedly in spite of consistent invalidation."
~ George Kelly

"The water is your friend.....you don't have to fight with water, just share the same spirit as the water, and it will help you move."
~ Aleksandr Popov
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  #9  
Old 07-16-2015
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Talvi View Post
Hi Werner

It may help here if I clarify/expand on the difference between what I called swimming in circles and swimming in clockwise/counter-clockwise traffic flows.

In Finland we swim in 2.5m wide lanes each separated from the other by a lane rope. Each of these lanes is then notionaly divided by the swimmers into two 1.2m wide tracks, around the lane marker line on the bottom of the pool, and swimmers swim in a counter-clockwise flow, up one side of each lane and down the other, turning on the wall "T" in close to a normal manner. No swimming across the end of these lanes is needed or possible and this is the key difference to the Scottish "lanes" system.

The offer of "lane swimming" in Scotland is made by removing lane ropes so that lanes become combined. Swimmers are obliged to swim in a circle, clockwise, in these larger areas so it is not possible to turn in a normal manner at the end as there is a 5m+ width to cross before you are able to swim back in the opposite direction. Slow breastroke swimmers manage to keep swimming all around the circular path but freestylers have to either stop and shuffle across the ends before doing another lap, making swimming more than 25m at a time impossible, or else come off the wall at an angle, with the attendant risks of collision etc.

Lanes are combined in Finland too, but only for vesijuoksu (water-running) and other water based exercise, not for lane swimming.
I've never seen what you call "Scottish" lanes. The usual protocol here is that people swim counterclockwise (sort of like a typical U.S. road where motorists stay on the right side of the road, from their point of view).

It's also common, if there are only 2 swimmers in a lane, for each swimmer to stay on one side of the lane (effectively dividing the lane into 2 half-lanes, with each swimmer staying in their own half lane), so that if the swimmers are swimming at different speeds, they don't get in each other's way. At some facilities, this dual protocol is actually posted, but at others, the 2 swimmers just agree to it between them.

The weirdest thing I ever saw was a pool with extremely narrow lanes where it was impossible for 2 swimmers to pass each other in a single lane. So they only allowed 1 swimmer per lane. If all of the lanes were full, you had to write your name on a white board waiting list, and when there was a waiting list, swimmers were restricted as to how long they could stay in a lane before they had to get out and let another swimmer in (putting their own name at the bottom of the waiting list if they wanted to swim longer).


Bob
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  #10  
Old 07-16-2015
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Talvi View Post
Not familiar with buoy turns.
There are numerous ways to do them. It's been a while since I've done the kind I was taught, but if memory serves, this is how to turn left to go counter-clockwise around a buoy in an open water event.
  1. As the left arm enters the water and pushes forward, use it as an axis to pivot around until you're on your back.
  2. As you recover your right arm, roll your body back over onto the front as the right arm enters the water again.
  3. Swim a few strokes until you're nearly past the buoy (or in this case, around the bottom of the passing lane)
  4. Repeat to turn 90º again to head up the other side
To turn clockwise, just reverse the arms and start with your right arm as the pivot.
I don't know if this explanation makes any sense, I'll have to practice this turn next time I'm swimming and see if I can describe it any more clearly.

Last edited by Rhoda : 07-16-2015 at 10:02 PM.
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