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  #11  
Old 05-09-2012
luis9889 luis9889 is offline
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luis9889
Default Bilateral Breathing

Breathing, in general, is a real challenge for me. I've purchased Terry's 'O2 in H2O' but I find that I falter with kick and stroke when concentrating on breathing. I'm considering the use of a snorkel to help me concentrate on my stroke before dealing with my breathing. Is this advisable? If so, is there a particular snorkel that's recommended?
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  #12  
Old 05-09-2012
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
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Hi luis9889,

no experience with a snorkel, but I'd recommend first to do all the drills of "Perpetual motion". After that there will be some space to focus on breathing... (Have in mind, I'm a TI-beginner too...)

Hi CoachtoddE,
the last days I focused on SL/SR and found: The strokes on my "well felt" side are mostly half a stroke more per lap than that on "worse side". May be the worse should become the better... But it does not feel so...

Regards,
Werner
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  #13  
Old 05-09-2012
CoachToddE CoachToddE is offline
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Hi CoachtoddE,
the last days I focused on SL/SR and found: The strokes on my "well felt" side are mostly half a stroke more per lap than that on "worse side". May be the worse should become the better... But it does not feel so...

Regards,
Werner[/quote]

Werner,

Not sure I'm understanding "well felt" side and 'worse side". Is the 'well felt' side the side you breather to with more ease? If you are breathing on the 'worse side' are you keeping your lead arm extended in skate position until you are spearing with the opposite arm? If you are allowing this lead arm to slip down then this is where you are losing spl on the 'worse side'. Not sure, guessing here by your description.

luis9889,
Finis makes two good snorkels. The swimmer's snorkel would probably be the best for you.
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  #14  
Old 05-10-2012
WFEGb WFEGb is offline
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Hallo CoachToddE,

first: I try hard to swim an as most as for me possible left/right symmetrical stroke.

When breathing to my ("good") right side it just FEELS better and easier.

When breathing to my ("worse") left side it just FEELS a little bit not so good. (Had some hard hours to even reach this feeling...)

BUT: When counting my SPL exactly there ist mostly half a stroke up to one stroke less per lap, when breathing on the left (my worse felt) side...

BTW: When trying to swim whole stroke I always try to have my catch hand and forearm on a thaught line just in front of my head where the recovery hand enters the water (is this a mistake?)

Regards,
Werner
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  #15  
Old 05-10-2012
Donal F Donal F is offline
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Werner,

Oddly, breathing left feels cleaner to me. I only added left breathing after going to a TI workshop in late 1990s, so I'm probably doing it with fewer bad habits, but breathing right is still faster.
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  #16  
Old 05-10-2012
Grant Grant is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donal F View Post
Werner,

Oddly, breathing left feels cleaner to me. I only added left breathing after going to a TI workshop in late 1990s, so I'm probably doing it with fewer bad habits, but breathing right is still faster.
I have heard this quite often. That when one takes instruction or consciously intends to master the vanilla side or awkward side breathing, often then the new learning results in a smoother technique then the old entrenched technique on the good side.
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May we swim with ease at the speeds we choose.
Grant
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  #17  
Old 05-10-2012
Donal F Donal F is offline
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Thanks for the feedback. I expanded the subject into a blog post, here:

http://dagblog.com/sports/bilateral-breathing-13719

but I'll still follow the discussion here.
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  #18  
Old 05-24-2012
Donal F Donal F is offline
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Two weeks ago, I swam two days of 500m warmups with 5x100 sets of crawl, breast and back and 5x50 sets of crawl and breast. All my crawl repeats were 1R/1L bilateral and felt very fluid. Saturday May 12th, several 50m lanes were open, so I went for the long swim.

I felt dog slow doing 2R/2L and lost count of laps after the first 500m. I keep a small clock near the edge of the pool, and after 25 minutes I was feeling just a bit short of air, so I switched to 3R/3L for two lengths, then back to 2R/2L. I was fine after that. Based on previous times I figured I must be close to 1600m. I felt so slow that I swam an extra 100m just to be sure I made 1600, then stopped.

The Poolmate told me I had swum 1900m, which stunned me, as it would have meant dropping about 8 seconds per 100m. But a few days later I swam a 500m warmup, in the 50m lane, and actually counted 5 laps, but the Poolmate told me I had swum 600m at a pace that was ten seconds faster than my subsequent 100m repeats. So I really have to concentrate on properly stopping the Poolmate's counter. I'm fairly sure that the 1900m was really 1800m, which still makes the pace as fast as I was at the end of last summer.

Yesterday afternoon's 1600m swim, in a 25m lane, was all 2R/2L and perfectly comfortable and the Poolmate reported one less stroke cycle, or two less strokes, per length. With no feelings of breathing anxiety, I had more freedom to think about form. I plan to do some fist sets this weekend.
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  #19  
Old 06-05-2012
Donal F Donal F is offline
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Last week's swimming was mostly 500 warmups followed by 5x this and that. One day I forgot my watch and did some fist lengths, body dolphin and fun stuff. I'm feeling confident that several years of plantar woes are over and have started running again. I also ran across and started using the LoseIt website. Running, swimming, biking to work and counting calories has led to losing 15 quick lbs.

Yesterday, I swam 1600m in a 50m lane. I swam a steady 2R/2L except that I took 3R after the turn and glide. At first my upper arms felt slightly fatigued, perhaps from biking to the pool, but that feeling vanished after the first 500-600m. I felt relaxed throughout, with no sense of needing more air.

My count of laps agreed with the poolmate, and I swam about eight seconds faster per 100m than anything I did last year. I also dropped from 31 to 28 stroke cycles per the poolmate. I was logging 12 stroke cycles in the 25m lanes. I think my next goal will be to do the 500 in the same 1R/1L that I'm using for 50s, 100s and 200s now, and see how that feels

Last edited by Donal F : 06-05-2012 at 06:34 PM. Reason: clarify
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  #20  
Old 06-05-2012
mt6127 mt6127 is offline
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mt6127
Default Rotary breathing

rotary breathing should be seen as a skill that can be called upon as needed when racing. Age group coaches often run drill sets where swimmers tasked with breathing on various stroke counts to improve their breathing control, hold their form in between breathes and to be able to grab a breath as needed. Yes its true that many elite swimmers breath every 2 strokes when racing a medium distance or to a preferred side but many also alternate 2/4 or switch sides to watch another lane. Try this in the pool - note your current preferred breathing pattern... then do 2x25 breathing every nine strokes, then do 2x25 with a breath at 7 strokes, then 2x25 at 5 then 2x25 at 3 with about 10 seconds between 25s. Now take a minute then swim a 50 but only breath when you feel you need a breath. You'll probably find your pattern will be something like 5/3/4/2/3/3/3... If you find you have a preference to one side, it may be because you don't hold your head position the same or you roll more to one side than the other - which gives you good way to check the symmetry of your form and ultimately a smoother more efficient stroke... When you are racing or working at pace, work on holding your head position (ie stay face down if you're not getting a breath) and breath when you need to. How often you need to breath has other factors like age, pace, race etc, but its a great skill to work on.
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