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  #1  
Old 01-09-2009
rjsteadman rjsteadman is offline
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rjsteadman
Default Weak side breathing

Hi all.
I'm going back to look at my weaker side breathing again, as my strong side is now pretty good and fluent. It seems that the reason I'm not that comfortable on the wrong is side just that when I turn with the same ease and rotation as I do on my good side, my mouth is still underwater. So the only way I can do it is to 'contort' a bit, and twist the head and back round.

I've had people watch me and they say that on my good side the stroking arm appears to be stronger and lifts me up enough to get air. I'm not conscious of doing this - I'm concentrating on anchoring then spearing forward.

It doesn't seem like a good idea to focus on pushing harder with the stroking arm to fix this. What would be a better approach??

Thanks,
Robert.
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  #2  
Old 01-09-2009
ny1301 ny1301 is offline
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Default

I am also working on this problem now. Just found out when I am on my "good" side, my neck is relaxed, and I let the water to support my head; on my "bad" side, as I am not as confident, I 'secretly' intense my neck. I will try relax neck this weekend and see if it fixes my problem.

Found my problem based on Dave's advice on the other question you posted.

Last edited by ny1301 : 01-09-2009 at 06:19 PM.
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  #3  
Old 01-17-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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When you roll to the bad side you have to try to duplicate what you are doing with the good side meaning you are:
pressing in to the water the same amount
reaching down to the same clock position
keeping your hand on the same track in front of shoulder
keeping head in line with spine when you breathe

work more on rolling to the weak side when you swim and eventually it will catch up to the good side

Dave
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  #4  
Old 01-23-2009
rjsteadman rjsteadman is offline
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rjsteadman
Default

Okay, thanks, I'll work on that some more. I'm already getting a minor improvement.
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  #5  
Old 01-23-2009
Jamwhite Jamwhite is offline
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Jamwhite
Default

Although I breath on both sides well, breathing is one of the weakest points on my stroke because I still must concentrate to keep everything in the right position.

The way that I have been improving is by doing head nods every 3 strokes while practicing breathing lengths. Instead of actually taking a breath, I simply move my head as if I were. Normally I could take a breath, but I am not focused on it and don't. Instead, I am focused on good alignment while in breathing position.

It might help you to get more comfortable and relaxed on your weak side that way. You could try doing one "fake" breath on the weak side then take a real breath.
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  #6  
Old 01-24-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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RadSwim
Default Try recovering earlier for easier breathing

TI friends-

I recently made a surprising discovery about breathing on my weak side. At a stroke clinic last month, the coach had us try starting our recovery earlier.

I had been in the habit of brushing my thigh with my thumb as I finished my pull and started recovery.

At the coach's recommendation, I tried recovering earlier, as my forearm started to become "unvertical" -- basically, as my hand passed my waist. This earlier recovery eliminated the inefficient end of the pull phase where my triceps forcibly straightened my elbow and I threw a bit of water above the surface with my stroking hand.

I noticed several changes immediately (in the order of discovery):
1. stroke felt short (weird)
2. stroke rate increased, as did stroke count (different)
3. breathing was much easier, especially on my weak side (great!!!)
4. my body was riding a little higher (nice)
5. I was rotating a noticably less (comfortable) -- people on the side of the pool saw that I did not burying my shoulders so deep.

The coach and several of the other swimmers at the clinic remarked on how much difference they could see from the side of the pool when I switched back and forth between my usual at-the-thigh recovery and the earlier above-the-hip recovery.

A month later, I am still recovering earlier and swimming faster with higher stroke rate. My stroke count has deceased but is still higher than my baseline. Breathing on my strong side is always easy now. On my weak side, I still occasionally miss a breath. When this happens, I focus on early recovery and the weak side breathing becomes easy.

Anyone else with similar experience?

If you have not tried earlier recovery, see if it makes positive changes in your swimming.

Always experimenting,

RadSwim
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  #7  
Old 02-02-2009
ny1301 ny1301 is offline
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ny1301
Default

Funny or not, the fact is now I am breathing on my previously 'weak' side, and I have difficulty to breath on my previously 'good' side! When you attack your 'weak' side, don't forget to practice on your good side once in a while!

BTW, I found the 'nod' Jamwhite mentioned (Terry introduced it in the book) was very helpful.

Radswim, Coach Brian suggested two pause over-switch drill in his blog which is your previously "late recovery". Did you check that?
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  #8  
Old 02-03-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
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RadSwim
Default Definitely not pausing for late recovery

ny1301-

No, my late recovery is simply my thumb brushing my thigh. My "late recovery" stroke is defintely not the 2-pause overswitch drill that Coach Brian recommends. It is simply the long, perhaps excessively long, stroke that many of us use.

I will never again deliberately insert a pause into my drills. It took me almost 2 years to unlearn the pause at the right ear in overswitch that I learned from my first TI coach and from the Freestyle Made Easy DVD! Deliberate pauses are on my list of things I wish I had never learned.

Regarding "wrong side" breathing, I am also now more comfortable breathing to my dominant (right) side, which was my "unnatural" breathing side before I began my TI journey. I think that I tend to over-rotate when I left breathe, a problem that disappears when I recover earlier.

RadSwim

Last edited by RadSwim : 02-03-2009 at 04:06 AM. Reason: correct typo
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  #9  
Old 02-03-2009
ny1301 ny1301 is offline
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ny1301
Default "never again deliberately insert a pause into my drills"

"never again deliberately insert a pause into my drills". This is alarming! anyone else had this problem? Will tempo trainer help to correct this?
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  #10  
Old 02-03-2009
Folala Folala is offline
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Folala
Default

RadSwim. I read with interest on what you've said about early recovery. I've started having a go at breathing on my weak (left) side a few months ago, I know I over rotate when I breathe on this side (could not get to air otherwise).

Will have a go at earlier recovery as you suggested. Thanks for the tip.
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