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  #1  
Old 08-26-2013
CSLEE CSLEE is offline
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CSLEE
Default how to speed up stroke

In any swimming competition, it is obvious that quicker arm stroke motion will enable swimmers to swim faster, but for certain swimmers, no matter how we remind them to speed up their arm motion, they are still unable to do so.
My questions are:
a) why so? Is it because they lack arm strength which allow them to push faster in the water and swing faster above the water?
b) how to correct this shortfall? Can we train them to increase their stroke count?
c) for my son when swims backstroke, he always pauses before entering water and pauses again before he starts pushing the water forwards. How to overcome this bad habit?

Thank.
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  #2  
Old 08-26-2013
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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One of the drills used by some backstroke coaches, but not as far as I know by TI coaches, is the drill in which you push off with your head somewhat up and facing towards your feet and just try to move your arms as fast as possible, without thinking of any fine points. I don't think it's possible to swim a full 25 meters with this stroke but it does encourage a quick catch and recovery with no pauses. I think it may be called the windmill drill. I'll try to find out.

I think it's very likely that it's not encouraged by the TI school, which tends to favour a long, powerful and smooth stroke. The aim in all good backstroke, of course, is to try to have as continuous a stroke as possible, ideally with no pauses.

PS Some call it the spin drill.

Last edited by Richardsk : 08-26-2013 at 05:39 PM.
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  #3  
Old 08-27-2013
CSLEE CSLEE is offline
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Thank, Richardsk, I certainly do not agree to have swimmers doing this type of spin drill, in any stroke, smooth and continuous motion is the most vital, but maybe i wud try it out with my kid just to let him have a sense of continuous stroke without pauses.
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Old 08-27-2013
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hi CSLEE

You will often see elite swimmers doing a bit of this dill at the beginning of their races - just after they jump or dive in some do this drill back to the blocks for the start. It obviously gets them "in the mood".

I also understand that it is a lot of fun to do and would appeal to kids.
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  #5  
Old 08-28-2013
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSLEE View Post
In any swimming competition, it is obvious that quicker arm stroke motion will enable swimmers to swim faster, but for certain swimmers, no matter how we remind them to speed up their arm motion, they are still unable to do so.
It is obvious that, all other things being equal, a quicker arm stroke motion will enable swimmers to swim faster. But water is such a dense medium that stroking faster can actually slow you down if it results in even a slight deterioration in stroke technique, thereby increasing drag. So the trick is learning to increase stroke rate while maintaining perfect technique.

Quote:
My questions are:
a) why so? Is it because they lack arm strength which allow them to push faster in the water and swing faster above the water?
It's very unlikely that the second part is a problem, but the first part could be. But I'd make sure a swimmer's technique is good before worrying about his stroke rate.

Quote:
b) how to correct this shortfall? Can we train them to increase their stroke count?
After you've tuned a swimmer's stroke technique, I'd have them practice swimming in pace with a Tempo Trainer, and then gradually increase the TT pace.

Quote:
c) for my son when swims backstroke, he always pauses before entering water and pauses again before he starts pushing the water forwards. How to overcome this bad habit?
If I'm understanding the first part of your statement correctly, he's pausing with his recovering hand just above the water before puts it in. That's obviously going to unbalance him, so it's not a good thing. I'd suggest having him do the one-arm drills that are described in the TI Backstroke DVD. When his brain begins to recognize head lead and hand lead sweet spot as the end points of the stroke and recovery, I think you'll find that the pause before entering will disappear on its own.

But it's not a bad thing to pause after entering the water and before initiating the stroke, if his recovering arm doesn't pause. What he will be doing is staying in his hand lead sweet spot (which is a very streamlined position) during the first part of his recovery. The Backstroke DVD includes some drills that should help him to identify the ideal point in his recovery at which to initiate the armstroke.

Hope this helps!


Bob
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  #6  
Old 08-28-2013
terry terry is offline
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Default Press the Left Button on Tempo Trainer

CS
Put a Tempo Trainer in your son's cap. Set it at, say, 1.2 sec/stroke. Have him swim a 25 or 50. Take the TT out and press the left button twice, increasing Tempo to 1.18. Swim another 25 or 50. Take TT out and reset Tempo to 1.16.

Count strokes. Watch for roughness. If there's a big jump in SPL (more than 1 stroke every .04 sec adjustment or so) or he gets noticeable rougher, have him stop there and spend time acclimating to that Tempo.

This is far more scientific than sitting up in the water and spinning your arms.

SL x SR = V.

Spinning is all SR, no SL.
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  #7  
Old 08-29-2013
CSLEE CSLEE is offline
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Thank Coach Bob and Terry, your advice is valuable and makes a lot of sense.
I am truly considering to get a tempo trainer now though I thought of having it much earlier but it seems like maybe now he really needs one, but still I am a very much stroke-n-technique guy.
Thank again.
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