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  #11  
Old 01-01-2013
fire50 fire50 is offline
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Superb this is really awesome article and allot good information inside it ...
Indeed swimming is one of the best exercise to burn your fat, this is a way if you want to decrease you weight rapidly.


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Last edited by fire50 : 01-05-2013 at 11:27 AM.
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  #12  
Old 01-03-2013
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fire50 View Post
Superb this is really awesome article and allot good information inside it ...
Indeed swimming is one of the best exercise to burn your fat, this is a way if you want to decrease you weight rapidly.
I do know that I lost weight during the week I spent being trained as a TI coach, even though I was eating food from a college cafeteria for lunch every day.

I'm currently 183cm and 72kg. I lost about 5kg after I started baking my own bread instead of buying it from the store.
ob
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  #13  
Old 01-04-2013
CoachMatHudson CoachMatHudson is offline
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Default Diet by region

I live with my whole family in Turkey for 5 years though we've been back to the US a few times. When we go we have learned to be VERY careful with our diet in the US- I cannot easily point to the culprits (though I have my theories) but to say that as careful as we are, and selective about how to eat and portions, we all still gain weight- and that is something I have never been known for. It is such a digestive relief to return to Turkey to our diet that is much more whole foods based and far less processed foods. Even Europe 'feels' better on my digestive system for some reason.

I don't believe it's necessarily any one or few big culprits, but rather a sprinkling of stuff in just about everything we eat there- and it all adds up to a digestive trouble, and then weight trouble.

Bread is one of those culprits. Here the bread is simply flour, water, yeast, and maybe salt. That's it. In the US if there are more than 6 ingredients listed on the bread package, and if any of them are not nuts and grains, I don't eat it.

And the fact that sugar is put into just about every processed food it seems. From years of observation I consider sugar one of my chief enemies now. I train my body's metabolism to depend on things other than refined simple sugars- simply by not supplying them.

For instance, yogurt here is just plain yogurt. No other additives. In the US I am hard pressed to find a decent plain yogurt without any other additives in it, especially sugar.

The 'cleansing' of our bodies from whatever was building up in them as resident Americans has been dramatic and pleasing. Now we feel ultra sensitive to the affects when we go back, or go anywhere. I simply have little appetite for restaurant foods and processed foods- and can feel the subtle effects. Even most creamy-like salad dressings seem to have an unpleasant affect.

But we still dream of Thai and good ol Mexican dishes!

Can't say I have solutions. Moving out of the US is certainly not practical for most. (We've got diet 'dangers' here too.) And I don't want to encourage conspiracy thinking, but from my experience something is really jacked up in the US food system. There is an obvious weight problem in the US which anyone I have talked to from Europe notices immediately upon stepping into a US airport- the size of people is dramatically obvious. Yet the weight problems may not necessarily be from a person's lack of self-control or lack of care in what is eaten. I am concerned deeply for the whole food supply chain there.

But one good antidote is to keep the metabolism strong and hungry with 6 days of swimming a week!

I wrote this blog essay some time ago and it still gets hits quite often: Does Swimming Burn Fat? http://wp.me/pR9zj-6T

Just my thoughts on it.
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Last edited by CoachMatHudson : 01-04-2013 at 08:09 AM.
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  #14  
Old 01-04-2013
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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I put weight on in the states each year too, but if I lived there I would seek out the farmers markets or similar. As a tourist I'm happy to put weight on for a month and indulge in the great service levels of the all american 24 hour diner.
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  #15  
Old 01-04-2013
CoachMatHudson CoachMatHudson is offline
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Default Body types and fat

It was very insightful to read Lynn Cox's book "Swimming To Antartica". You can see her photos on the web and notice, like so many cool temp ow swimmers, she is rounded out like a seal, but no one can doubt her extreme athleticism.

Something noted in the book was her 'neutral' buoyancy. Perhaps this means her body sits at an ideal depth in the water.

Also, I have heard smatterings on the web about brown fat versus white fat. I posted some links to this at one time. http://wp.me/pR9zj-eV

Granted, having low density (or wearing neoprene) lifts a person higher in the water and lowers the amount of water resistance they must work against- hence we go faster in black skin. But being higher in the water also makes the swimmer more vulnerable to the lateral balance disrupting forces of waves/chop. Even in smooth water a swimmer sitting higher than normal (wearing neoprene) will need to adjust rotation, control it a bit more than normal, to accommodate for that vulnerable position. The tracks need to get a bit wider, especially in rough water with lateral wave forces.

A few times I've compared the difference swimming in rough water with a sleeveless suit and without, and I definitely prefer going without to conserve energy.

I've been staying in the sea as it gets cooler this winter, but I haven't seemed to be putting on any 'seal blubber' yet to make it feel warmer. I do wonder what kind of provocation my body would need to actually start changing body composition to adapt noticeably like that. Not that I want that to happen...
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  #16  
Old 01-04-2013
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquarius View Post
Fat is actually an advantage for swimming (better buoyancy, making balance much easier), and weight is not an issue (as it is for runners).

I've often wondered in what proportions buoyancy varies from one individual to another. I'm sure there have been studies on the question, but where?

Does anyone have any actual figures?

Thanks.
http://ajs.sagepub.com/content/11/6/398.abstract
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  #17  
Old 01-04-2013
MarkYairi MarkYairi is offline
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Well, in my humble experience of swimming about 12k/week, I find it hard to keep the fat on, and I'm definitely a meso-endo type.

I can't imagine Olympian swimmers being anything other than lean simply because of how active their metabolism will be and how many calories they burn.
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  #18  
Old 01-04-2013
aquarius aquarius is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachSuzanne View Post
Thanks. But I'd be more interested in figures comparing the density of different body types - how much does it vary?

(According to Wikipedia:

1062 kg/m3 = 1.062 g/cm3 Average human body density)

I did find this old but interesting study:

http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/639241.pdf
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  #19  
Old 01-05-2013
CoachMatHudson CoachMatHudson is offline
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Default Density comparisons

Aquarius, other than curiosity at the numbers, do you envision a way to use those numbers for some training or personal purpose?

I can't offer actual numbers, but just in coaching a wide range of body types it still seems quite amazing that one student will float so comfortably, without effort, at the surface, while another sinks like a torpedo even with great front/aft balance. It's logical but interesting. There is quite a range in body density, relative to that buoyancy point water.

Working backwards from neutral buoyancy point for each of these two extremes, with a couple fluids equations we could calculate actual density of each to see the range. It's essentially what happens in measuring a person's mass and then measuring water displacement in a dunk tank. Had that done to me 20 years ago in a college study on endurance athletes. Wonder what my readings would be now!

I swim in the sea alot. I have not measured it, but saw it somewhere that salt water can lift a person .75 cm higher than in fresh water. There is variation in salinity so I wonder how much we can expect in extra buoyancy in our extremely salty Med, compared to a low salinity area like the Oregon Pacific Coast (where I am from originally).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WO..._SAL_AYool.png
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mediterraswim.com

My blog with over 400 posts on TI technique and mindful training: Smooth Strokes Blog

Email: mat@mediterraswim.com
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