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  #1  
Old 07-12-2011
cm67 cm67 is offline
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cm67
Default time in pool?

How often do you go to the pool and how long on average do you stay there?

Also, I am a beginner to TI and was wondering how much time do the expert swimmers on here spend on there technique whilst at the pool...do you guys still practise drills regularly?
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  #2  
Old 07-12-2011
sinker sinker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cm67 View Post
How often do you go to the pool and how long on average do you stay there?

Also, I am a beginner to TI and was wondering how much time do the expert swimmers on here spend on there technique whilst at the pool...do you guys still practise drills regularly?
CM
I go to the pool 3 or 4 times a week and swim about an hour.

I will answer the second part of your post even though it is addressed to "expert swimmers".
One hundred percent of my time in the pool is spent on technique. Drills occupy about the first ten minutes. The rest of the time is spent swimming freestyle, but always with a particular focal point concentration. Patient lead hand---really, really, really relax head----relaxed hand pointing to bottom of pool----use rotation to fulcrum over vertical catch paddle, rather than pull and slip hand through water---- get full extension on lead arm---etc.

If you are serious about learning TI, never go to the pool and just go through the motions without a specific purpose.
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  #3  
Old 07-13-2011
cm67 cm67 is offline
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Originally Posted by sinker View Post
CM
I go to the pool 3 or 4 times a week and swim about an hour.

I will answer the second part of your post even though it is addressed to "expert swimmers".
One hundred percent of my time in the pool is spent on technique. Drills occupy about the first ten minutes. The rest of the time is spent swimming freestyle, but always with a particular focal point concentration. Patient lead hand---really, really, really relax head----relaxed hand pointing to bottom of pool----use rotation to fulcrum over vertical catch paddle, rather than pull and slip hand through water---- get full extension on lead arm---etc.

If you are serious about learning TI, never go to the pool and just go through the motions without a specific purpose.
like it :-)
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  #4  
Old 07-13-2011
terry terry is offline
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CM
Sinker put it well. Even after nearly 50 yrs of swimming, almost 40 of coaching and 22 yrs practicing TI, I still feel like an aspiring, rather than expert, swimmer.
To my mind the only real 'experts' are dolphins who convert 80 percent of energy and horsepower into locomotion.
Michael Phelps converts less than 10 percent - so one could even question whether he's an expert. ;-)

Knowing that human swimmers are 'energy-wasting machines' I go to the pool each time aspiring to improve in some small, yet specific, way.

I.E. Rather than a general hopefulness that I'll get better (or worse yet no expectation whatsoever of improvement), I go with a plan to work on a specific, such as the examples shown and explained in posts 8, 9 and 10 on the thread "Building Endurance and Speed" on the Favorite Practices and Sets conference.

This is an example of a practice suitable to someone who has done many years of TI and illustrates how whole-stroke practice can still be keenly focused on specific improvement. It also illustrates the principle of objective, empirical measurement when you pursue improvement with whole-stroke practice.

On the other hand, when I launched TI in 1989, it took several years of experience teaching 'late-starting adults' to move away from my former, relatively traditional, views on technique and recognize the great advantages--even potential magic--of learning in this order
1) Balance -- to be comfortable, 'weightless' and stable in the water.
2) Streamlining - to move through the water, rather than move the water around.
3) Propelling with Weight Shifts, rather than Arm/Leg Muscles - to align your actions with natural forces, rather than generate muscular forces.

For those who have never practiced them before, these skills are best learned through drills. Even though I had already swum competitively for 25 years, and had even won a medal or two at US Masters National Championship, when we developed this approach to teaching in the early and mid-90s, I went back to basics to learn them myself. That meant a heavy diet of drill practice from 1992 through about 1999, with drills accounting for 50 percent or more of my practice in the first few years and dropping gradually to maybe 30 percent near the end.

Over the next 5-6 years the proportion of whole-stroke increased from 70 percent to 90 percent+. This is because while drills have proven to be, without question, the fastest and easiest way to learn the component skills of efficient swimming, you really need whole-stroke to integrate those components and help them work in seamless harmony.

Since around 2007 I've done virtually 100 percent whole-stroke, but in the manner illustrated in that thread and others on the Forum.

To help you with the process of learning Balance, Streamline and Whole-Body Propulsion, we've created a Self-Coached Workshop DVD which shows a sequence of 10 step-by-step lessons, which have been tested over 20 years with 10s of 1000s of swimmers.
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May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story

Last edited by terry : 07-13-2011 at 09:42 AM.
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  #5  
Old 07-13-2011
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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Default Time Varies

My first introduction to TI was three plus years ago. Post TI weekend workshop the same question was asked and our instructor said initially in pool time should be limited to between 40 and 50 minutes. His reasoning being, initially while learning skills with most emphasis being on skill sets, it is difficult to maintain that focus any longer.

I found that to be about right for me. With the passing of time and moving more to whole stroke as Terry described I am now spending 60 to 75 minutes per session. Drills account for anywhere from 15 to 20 minutes with the rest being Tempo Trainer sets with focus on stroke length, breathing and other aspects.

I can not remember the last time I swam over a continuous 200 yds whole stroke in a pool.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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  #6  
Old 07-13-2011
DVLAswim DVLAswim is offline
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I'm by no means an expert but I thought I'd chime in anyway.

When I began TI swimming in September of last year. I spent about 30-40 minutes int he pool twice a week. Now I spend an hour and a half in the pool and would go to two hours if I could get the time. I find that every lap after an hour gets progressively more and more peaceful, focused and enjoyable.

But, I also wanted to suggest another for m of practice to you that I feel has helped me a lot: swimming when you aren't in the water. Since I began swimming TI I have been adding swimming to my meditation practice.

Before I sleep I usually watch one of Terry or Shinji's video's on youtube. I try to imagine what it would feel like to actually be in their body as they swim. Where are they relaxed? How does that kick feel? What does it feel like to move that way?

Then I head to the cushion for some clearing and then to bed. Before I sleep as I glide through that state just before dreaming, I swim. I do the same thing I do in the pool. I pick a swim thought. I count strokes. I try to feel the water.

Swimming out of the pool isn't as effective as swim time spent in the water, but it's a lot better than doing nothing. It keeps your mind in the water but you don't have to worry about over training. It helps one develop a peaceful mind and adds a depth to practice.

Be careful though. I've kicked my wife a couple of times when I've fallen a bit too deep into the visualization.
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Old 07-13-2011
westyswoods westyswoods is offline
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DVLAswim makes an excellent point of swimming when not in the pool. There are so many dry land drills which can aid when in the pool. One of those I currently do while standing in front of a full length mirror is rotation of hips and shoulders while working on maintaining straight spine alignment and a steady head.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
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  #8  
Old 07-14-2011
celeslau celeslau is offline
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I do exactly what DVLA does - watching and visualising Terry/Shinji-like sensation. Except, I do it just before each pool session because in the first 5 mins of pool time, I often feel intimidated by those bigger power swimmers in neighboring lanes (I get hit by their currents) and I bring my visualisation back to Shinji's video to remain calm and focused. Beeping of the tempo trainer does help with the focusing. Therefore, I also agree that the longer I swim, the more relaxed and focused I become. Also at this stage, the power swimmers are loosing steam and swimming less aggressively. It's a pity I only have 30mins to swim but nevertheless I emerge from the pool, in Terry's words: 'feeling balanced, vital, happy and healthy' !
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  #9  
Old 07-14-2011
tab tab is offline
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tab
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This is cool. Yes, the longer I an in the pool/ow the more relaxed I feel. How come this takes so long to happen? After years of swimming does one just jump in and the relaxation just happen? I typically swim for about an hour in the pool, half and hour in open water. The open water is shorter due to the time factor available to me at this time of the year. I wish it could be longer. I also use visualization.
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