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  #21  
Old 08-31-2012
sinker sinker is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westyswoods View Post
I found the following quote by Charles very interesting and informative. I have been wondering if this is not one of the causes for hamstring cramps during long periods of OW swims. Fact is my hip flexors are extremely tight, with weak gluts and hamstrings, especially on the left side which is more prone to cramping

"I don't think it's a good idea to ask someone to induce any tension at the lowerback/glute/hamstrings level if the hip flexors are too tight. It's in fact, completely ridiculous."

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
Westy
I used to get cramps also in my hamstrings and calves after 30 or 45 minutes swimming. Then I believe it was Coach Suzanne who recommended a magnesium supplement for cramps. After some research I settled on Swanson's magnesium citrate powder. It is inexpensive and cramps are now a rarity for me.
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  #22  
Old 10-01-2012
Jeffinhawaii Jeffinhawaii is offline
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To get back to the posts original question, it seems to me that the timing of the opposite legs flick to the entry of the spearing arm is really the cornerstone of the entire t.i. philosophy and that no other timing will work. I think it should be the basis for learning t.i.

If you watch shinjis videos, he actually delivers a very forceful "flick". Especially strong on his left leg. Terry's kick is more subtle. But the timing of down kick on the leg opposite the spearing arm is the most important aspect of the whole stroke. All the rest will fall into place once this is achieved.
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  #23  
Old 10-19-2012
Amerrizvi Amerrizvi is offline
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Yes. And the stronger you flick your foot, the faster the body rotation is on that side and the quicker you glide.

This is the crux of the TI methodology; flick, rotate, glide. I was watching fishes swimming in an aquarium the other day, and that's just what they do; flick...glide...flick...glide...flick...glide...
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  #24  
Old 10-19-2012
Amerrizvi Amerrizvi is offline
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And one more thing...rotation does not come from the hips...it comes from the strong foot flick. Imagine swimming with your feet tied; you would not be able to rotate...not at all!
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  #25  
Old 10-19-2012
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amerrizvi View Post
And one more thing...rotation does not come from the hips...it comes from the strong foot flick. Imagine swimming with your feet tied; you would not be able to rotate...not at all!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHSYQ6BaM2A
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  #26  
Old 10-19-2012
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
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I think I might want to do this one Charles, what's happening underwater, can you explain the drill a little

thanks.
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  #27  
Old 10-19-2012
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amerrizvi View Post
And one more thing...rotation does not come from the hips...it comes from the strong foot flick. Imagine swimming with your feet tied; you would not be able to rotate...not at all!
My take on the kick is that it helps propel the body into the final streamline, where rotation has ended.

It aids in rotation, as part of the kinetic chain, but rotation isn't dependent upon it, as evidenced in the clip Charles posted. Some TIers leisurely draft, or have a very minimal kick.

Last edited by borate : 10-19-2012 at 02:30 PM.
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  #28  
Old 10-19-2012
jenson1a jenson1a is offline
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Hey Charles, how do you make this look so easy? Looks like a good drill.

Sherry
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  #29  
Old 10-19-2012
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
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Hey Sherry, thanks a lot, but that wasn't me (alhtough I perform this drill superbly well).

Before I release the details of what this drill is, I have a question for you.

Good swimmers do NOT even have to learn the drill. Part of what makes them good include the ability to rotate in this manner whilst getting fair propulsion.

Swimmers wanna be, at least a portion of them, struggle big time getting the drill sorted out.

What this tell us about that drill? It's a honest question, not a trap.
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  #30  
Old 10-19-2012
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Hi Charles

I must be a wannabe swimmer because when I tried this drill I was not successful. No doubt I should persevere because it obviously does supply some propulsion as well as rotation.
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