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  #11  
Old 04-27-2011
rajsenthil rajsenthil is offline
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Default Losing breath

From my experience, the breathing rhythm could be broken due to lack of balance or pulling.
The lack of balance would lead to many problems and one of them is breathing issue.
The pulling or oomph effect could result in sudden acceleration which could lead to the loss of breath.
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  #12  
Old 04-30-2011
rpm42 rpm42 is offline
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I'm having exactly the same problems after doing TI for just over a year now, but I am now convinced that it's a mental issue or something to do with timing, and it will fall into place some time. I know I'm not physically exhausted when I run out of breath after 50m, so that when I do get it, I think I'll be able to increase distance quite rapidly. Until then, I'm just going to focus on being relaxed as possible and experiment with exhaling and inhaling different amounts to try and find my pattern.
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  #13  
Old 04-30-2011
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpm42 View Post
I know I'm not physically exhausted when I run out of breath after 50m ... I'm just going to focus on being relaxed as possible and experiment with exhaling and inhaling different amounts to try and find my pattern.
Try this, or perhaps you have done so already...

As the recovering arm lifts from the water, take a quick mouth breath; don't tense or gasp. Do this once per cycle - same side.

As the recovering arm enters, begin exhaling through nose, mouth or both - whatever feels normal.
Don't force the exhale and do not be concerned with expelling every last ounce. You'll get another breath momentarily.

Once this routine is down, try skipping a cycle between breaths.
When that becomes second nature, try bi-breathing every third stroke. You can grab an extra breath if needed.

Last edited by borate : 05-01-2011 at 03:32 AM.
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  #14  
Old 04-30-2011
Mempho Mempho is offline
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When I first started swimming I had a similar problem, I tried to breathe but wasn't getting any air. My problem was that I was holding my breath. I couldn't breathe in because I wouldn't breathe out. At some level I was afraid if I let go of the air I had, I wouldn't be able to breathe in again.

My rational mind knew better, but some residual childhood anxiety was stopping me. It took about a week of breathing drills to overcome this. Mostly I did Skating drills in the shallow end, blowing bubbles under water to completely empty my lungs, then rolling to Sweet Spot to inhale. Little by little I relaxed and could breathe more naturally.

But I still envy Terry's casual attitude about getting to air in the TI videos. That's where I'd like to be.
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  #15  
Old 04-30-2011
tab tab is offline
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I am finding I need to keep momentum up, so a quick breath every three strokes, bilateral. I'm reasonable at breathing on my left side. It was my right side I was having problems with. What I have discovered is that I stall out, almost a lazy approach when it comes time to breath on my right side. I had to force my self to grab a quick breath on the right. I had been using my right hand to keep my self supported to take a lazy breath, taking my time, it wasn't working. This forced action has been what I have been lacking.

I still swim one length of the pool and rest for 30 seconds, there is no exhaustion now. I take the pause, for now, to regain my composure, so I can focus on what I am doing. I plan on shorting up the pause at the end until there is no pause, and crank out the full 50 and keep moving on. It just take some time, I am happy with where I am at.
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  #16  
Old 05-01-2011
terry terry is offline
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The response to posts about breathing is really striking to me. It's clear that not only are breathing problems are very common, but deeply frustrating as well.
This should alert those who struggle with breathing that such problems often have an emotional or psychological, as well as physical, component.

So awareness of the tension that often accompanies breathing issues -- even being able to specifically locate the tension and focus relaxation on it. As I type this I'm reminded of a breathing exercise often given in yoga classes. Yoga teachers often ask you to concentrate on breathing into areas that are tense.

One more tip that's worked for others on this forum who complained of breathlessness.
Breathe in just enough air. Don't try to fill your lungs.
Breathe out just enough as well. Don't try to squeeze every last air molecule from your lungs.
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  #17  
Old 05-02-2011
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post

One more tip that's worked for others on this forum who complained of breathlessness.
Breathe in just enough air. Don't try to fill your lungs.
Breathe out just enough as well. Don't try to squeeze every last air molecule from your lungs.

Terry
I have seen this advice on this forum mentioned a couple times as of late but is different from the usual long standing advice of making sure you fully expel the air so you can take in a fresh charge of new air ? So would you say this advice is for swimming with more of a casual stroke rate in general ?
I can't see how this would work as a good breathing pattern with more effort at higher speeds.

Dave

Last edited by daveblt : 05-02-2011 at 12:19 AM.
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  #18  
Old 05-02-2011
stcrispinsbay stcrispinsbay is offline
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Default Out of Breath Too

Rob,

The thread you wrote could have came from me. Yourproblem is exactly the same as mine, I mean to a tee. I too am a fairly descent runner and cyclist. I have been swimming for approximately 1 1/2 years and swim 3-4 days per week. When I first started swimming I was totally out of breath after 25 yards. I took several lessons and purchased several DVDs including several of the TI DVDs. I have studied the freestyle technique more than most. Currently I too can swim 50 yards and I am pretty well out of breath. During a typical workout I swim 750 - 1000 yards taking several breaks. I try to kick very little to conserve energy. After reading some of the threads I am beginning to believe that relaxation is a big part of it. I feel fairly relaxed when I swim but I don't think I am as relaxed as I need to be. I also am beginning to believe that at some point I will just have to push past the tired feeling until I get in the groove. I know the feeling in running when you get in the groove after a few minutes. I am going to take the TI course in June which is in my area. I want to be able to swim without getting tired very, very, badly as I enjoy swimming. I too am in the same boat as you. I wish you the best of luck.

Mark
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  #19  
Old 05-02-2011
efdoucette efdoucette is offline
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I'm in the exact same situation. A 50m and I'm out of breath. Hoping that when anyone reaches that aha moment they share how it came about.
Thanks
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  #20  
Old 05-02-2011
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
The response to posts about breathing is really striking to me. It's clear that not only are breathing problems are very common, but deeply frustrating as well.
This should alert those who struggle with breathing that such problems often have an emotional or psychological, as well as physical, component. ...
IMHO I think that the frustration is not about breathing itself but it's effects: getting winded after one or a few laps. Although this is rather obvious indeed and might not contribute to solve the problem. But you never know...

Quote:
Originally Posted by terry View Post
...
So awareness of the tension that often accompanies breathing issues -- even being able to specifically locate the tension and focus relaxation on it.
It's now more than 1,5 years since I started with freestyle and I could call it frustrating that I am still unable to swim continous laps due to 'breathing' problems.

Anyway, the last months I spent entirely on 'solving' my breathing problems. It didn't really work out so I tried to pinpoint what exactly this breathing problem is.
I found out that the problem is when I get water around or in my mouth while breathing because that is when I stop taking an inbreath. Not to breathe even once completely ruins my rhythm and brings me out of breath. Also after having water in my mouth I obviously swallow some parts of it together with some air and get an increasing pressure in my belly until it releases in belching, burping, eructing, or all of it ;-) I don't know what word you would use here.
While always trying to turn my head until my mouth was surely completely out in the air I now investigated the mechanics of my breathing and found out that I don't have to turn my head more than 90 degrees to the side. That is an easy rotation and can be done without overrotating. At this 90 degree position my face is almost half out of and half in the water - a little better on my right side, a little less on the left - so my mouth is just above the waterline when I breathe with my mouth faintly resembling a tadpole suffering from a stroke. Still there is water around and sometimes in my mouth so I need to practice to get used to breathe from that position with or without water in or around my mouth.
At the moment I simply do superman glides and imprint nice and 'good' breathing patterns with a few strokes after the SG, preferably in shallow water, so I can stop when I get out of breath or miss a breath and don't keep imprinting 'bad' patterns.

In fact although it doesn't look like swimming it is not frustrating at all. I know that this will work out, it just takes a bit of patience. The breathing pattern really improves. And at the same time I can clearly feel that my stroke gets more and more efficient.
I think there is nothing more efficient than bringing yourself in a position where you can imprint 'good' patterns. And always practicing that which does not feel easy. Staying with that what is uncomfortable is the challenge for the brain and most effective I think. Practicing what is easy is easy and feels easy but doesn't challenge the brain. No challenge, no learning, no improvement. It feels unfamiliar to practice like that, but it should be the standard.

One day... I will report a 1k or 1,5 k swim... or a 100 time of less than xxx ...


Hang on in there

Last edited by haschu33 : 05-02-2011 at 12:31 PM.
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