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  #1  
Old 05-14-2015
truwani truwani is offline
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truwani
Default discovery of flaws in technique thanks to absence of markers in pool

I have been working the last 6 months mainly on two things: to keep my head much lower while breathing and to enter the recovery with a steep angle instead of flat

During holiday last week my wife took the following video and I am happy with the result because I see much improvement on those areas (though probably still much improvements possible :-) )
www.youtube.com/watch?v=roBKUuew9Qk

However: in a second video I swim directly to the camera. In that small pool there was no single marker. What striked me is that without marker I do not swims straight at all: probably in the real pool I correct this through the marker signals, this is however a loss of efficiency
www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FrdDc4mwfk

So two questions:

1) what are the most important reasons for this non straight swim curve? I think crossing the midline on the recovery is certainly one. What are the others, how to correct?

2) there is quite some 'bananaing' in these video's. However in video's of TI swimmers I see some of this to, but to a lesser degree. Is it too much in my video? And how to correct this?
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  #2  
Old 05-14-2015
tomoy tomoy is offline
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I too have a mild left-veering tendency in open water. From what I've been coached the two biggest contributors are head position, and stroke asymmetry - most likely both due to breathing habits which manifest themselves everywhere. Considering my latest discoveries, I think posture (not arching the back) is another. I think the red herring is pushing harder on one side than the other.

From your video, it looks like you veer right when you breathe on the left side. So when you breathe try not to lean into your leading arm's shoulder. Rather rotate your head like it's a kebab/skewer. Rotating less would also help.

Then try bilateral breathing. It's a tough hurdle to get over, but worth it in terms of stroke symmetry which translates into less energy wasted wandering. You don't have to breathe every 3. Maybe do a couple breaths on one side, then a couple on the other, or in a longer pool switch sides every 8 or every length.

Anyway, give it a go and report back!
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  #3  
Old 05-14-2015
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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I have found that breathing every five or even every seven is an easier way into bilateral breathing than every three. It's an ongoing process and it's still much easier to breathe on one side only. I do think it's worth persevering, though. Usually I can only manage one length of a 25-meter pool breathing every five or seven, on the next length I usually have to revert to every two on my good side, but I think this is also something worth persevering with. Quite a few one-sided breathers breathe every four, even over long distances, so it should be possible to gradually make standard bilateral breathing a regular practice. .
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  #4  
Old 05-14-2015
truwani truwani is offline
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truwani
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Thanks for the feedback!

Tomoy:could you elaborate what you mean with 'arching the back' and why not to do it?

The rotation is a very interesting one: I thought one of the important TI principles is to swim on your side (to lessen front drag) and use your muscles of the back, so rotation seems key.
Do I over-rotate? (I just started a drill with swimming with both hands to your side and only propulsion through rotation)
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  #5  
Old 05-14-2015
Zenturtle Zenturtle is offline
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Your basic whole body action are OK, but concentrate on keeping on 3 tracks
ONe for your body and 2 lines next to tour body for left and right arm basic forward and rearward movements.
Now you throw the arm to the midline and the rear starts to fishtail as a reaction.
The recovery elbow is over the shoulde/shoulderrplane.The entry is too much towards the centerline. The underwatr movement is probably crossing the centerline.
Both are a recipe for future shoulder ptoblems.

A straight, level tracking basic vessel is one of the most important things in swimming.
Now you are moving like a snake through the water, not like a kajak.

Fot your basic swim posture start here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5V5PYspkknE

Last edited by Zenturtle : 05-14-2015 at 11:14 PM.
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  #6  
Old 05-15-2015
truwani truwani is offline
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Zenturtle thanks for the tip on the shoulderinjury prevention!!

There is so much info on the internet, but the link you have added seems good.
I'll try it out to get rid of the snake!
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  #7  
Old 05-15-2015
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by truwani View Post
I have been working the last 6 months mainly on two things: to keep my head much lower while breathing and to enter the recovery with a steep angle instead of flat

During holiday last week my wife took the following video and I am happy with the result because I see much improvement on those areas (though probably still much improvements possible :-) )
www.youtube.com/watch?v=roBKUuew9Qk

However: in a second video I swim directly to the camera. In that small pool there was no single marker. What striked me is that without marker I do not swims straight at all: probably in the real pool I correct this through the marker signals, this is however a loss of efficiency
www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FrdDc4mwfk

So two questions:

1) what are the most important reasons for this non straight swim curve? I think crossing the midline on the recovery is certainly one. What are the others, how to correct?

2) there is quite some 'bananaing' in these video's. However in video's of TI swimmers I see some of this to, but to a lesser degree. Is it too much in my video? And how to correct this?
hey truwani, in examining your straight on view video, i think i see you:

1. arching your body to get to air.
2. you are crossing the centerline when you spear.

2. may be the biggest reason for going off to one side. it seems like when you spear, you are driving your forward propulsion off to the opposite side, more so on the left spear so you veer to the right.

work on keeping wide tracks when you swim, and keep each spear to the outside of your shoulder line.

work on rotating along your spine as an axis, and turning smoothly to air while keeping your head aligned on your spine. it is one of the hardest things to master, which is to have enough body awareness as to what is straight body position and when you curve. go back to TI's rotational drills to help you imprint rotation on an axis, and then to breathing drills while maintaining strict head/spine alignment when you turn to air.

otherwise, your recovery looks pretty good, as does the entry. can't see what's going on underneath the surface very well, but it does look pretty good overall.
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  #8  
Old 05-15-2015
truwani truwani is offline
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truwani
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Thanks David!

I think with TI rotational drills you target the skate and zipper drills.

But which drills do you see for TI breathing drills (video link?)?
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  #9  
Old 05-19-2015
novaswimmer novaswimmer is offline
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I don't know if anyone mentioned your kicks. From the rear view your legs splay way out like an extreme scissors kick. If one moves out wider than the other, that will certainly throw your direction off! It looks like you are bending at the waist as your legs kick.

Hard to see all that's going on, but there's got to be a lot of drag created there too.

I would consider working on toning down the kicks. And try to kick downward (toward the bottom of the pool) to assist in that rotation. And try to keep that core straight, including below the waist.

Last edited by novaswimmer : 05-20-2015 at 06:18 PM.
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  #10  
Old 05-26-2015
truwani truwani is offline
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truwani
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Thanks novaswimmer, indeed that is a correct observation too.
Thus another focal point for me:keeping those legs together

If have been working on the remarks given:so far for sure the posture has been the hardest to work on. The dryland exercises are feasible, however once in the pool I find it very hard to pullthe bellybutton to the spine and push the cheast forward, while continuing to breath and focus on all the other important points.
But I understand the importance of posture: it will quite some training before this comes automatically, but I'll try to keep focus/train on it!
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