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  #11  
Old 03-27-2011
aquarius aquarius is offline
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Interesting read.

Quote:
Crossing arm through the sagittal plane (midline) during the pull phase.
What occurs during this motion biomechanically?
Forces the spine out of neutral alignment and sets up “fish-tailing” type of biomechanics throughout the body.
My question: why is a “fish-tailing” type of biomechanics bad for swimming?
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  #12  
Old 03-27-2011
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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Fishtailing presents a wider frontal area and increases drag significantly. It also directs force to the side, which is basically wasted. There may be other undesirable effects as well, as the coaches will no doubt point out.
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  #13  
Old 03-27-2011
JBeaty JBeaty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aksenov View Post
I think in her great explanation of scapular plane movements Suzanne meant the coronal (frontal) plane. These movements are also called scapton.
Scaption is an abduction (or adduction) movement in the scapular plane. It’s a safe movement direction to choose after trauma and operation of the shoulder joint, helping to regain the normal physiological range of movement.
Abduction is movement away from the midline
Adduction is movement toward the midline
This is a video of scaption
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AeGIwYZ0kJQ
Maybe these pictures will be helpful, too.
In looking at the first picture, would the scapula plane be considered the area between the frontal plane and the sagittal plane?
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  #14  
Old 03-27-2011
aksenov aksenov is offline
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aksenov
Default scapula plane

In looking at the first picture, would the scapula plane be considered the area between the frontal plane and the sagittal plane?

That is correct – scapular plane is the plane between the frontal plane and the sagittal plane at about 30-40 degrees to frontal plane (in front quadrant).
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  #15  
Old 03-28-2011
mandll mandll is offline
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Ok. So how does one one recover while staying in the scapular plane? I don't see how it is possible unless one roles over quite a bit. I certainly see ways to reduce the angle by shortening the finish a bit, keeping wide tracks and a bit of an arm swing in lieu of the high elbow recovery, but one would still be dragging at least part of the arm/hand through the water if recovering 30 degrees fwd of the frontal plane it seems. What am I missing?

msrk
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  #16  
Old 03-28-2011
mandll mandll is offline
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Based on the picture of the planes posted I think I see it now. I thin Coah Suzanne did mean exactly what she said..which was the saggital plane. The picture shows the saghital plane basically running just inside the shoulder line. so her statement that one wants to recover keeping recovery in from of this plane make sense now and is very doable. Sorry if i have caused confusion with my posts here. Thanks for the input

mark
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  #17  
Old 03-28-2011
CoachSuzanne CoachSuzanne is offline
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So sorry..I DID mean the coronal plane. I will edit my original post.

I usually have to refresh myself every time I refer to them and a picture is worth a thousand words.
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  #18  
Old 03-28-2011
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
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As usual Wikipedia is quite helpful

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomi..._human_anatomy
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  #19  
Old 03-28-2011
drmike drmike is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mandll View Post
...I have had constant shoulder problems ever since I started swimming again 2 years ago (took 20 years off after college) and 2 surgeries later it is only worse... Thanks

mark
Mark,

Do you mind telling me the types of surgery you had? I'm mulling over operation on at least one shoulder to tighten lax ligaments, cut out bursa, thin the head of acromion and shave the ends off of AC joint. Surgeons are great at repairing traumatic injuries, maybe less so with chronic injuries involving failure to heal. Feel free to respond by email.

Mike M.
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  #20  
Old 03-30-2011
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MatHudson MatHudson is offline
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Hey Aksenov,

Sorry to butt in on this thread but I notice you are in Russia. I am looking for some TI swimmers in Russia to make a connection with. The last two TI swimmers in Russia to post on the forum have been silent for quite a while.

Can we chat?
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