Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Links and References
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 12-23-2011
andyinnorway andyinnorway is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,680
andyinnorway
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by westyswoods View Post
I came looking for technique knowing nothing of philosophy. Kaizen has become the driving force in my staying with the technical and slow progress. The journey has been a very positive challenge.

Swim Silent and Be Well
Westy
Amen Amen Amen,

I was delighted after having near national standard friends at school, failed attempts to get better by just swimming and an infuriating 6 months in a masters club where I was ignored in the slow lane (not that any of the other lanes were getting any stroke advice either) to finally find a program that said, these are the elements of good freestyle, this is how you deconstruct them and learn them one at a time.

Reading Mastery and the TI book taught me that TI swimming was a practice and it was something to be enjoyed over 50 years not 12 weeks.

My biggest achievement (and TIĘs credit) will be unfaltering enthusiasm for a fitness based activity for 6 days a week for a whole year when feb 14th rolls around in 2012.

Swimming for me now is as ritual as prayers for certain religions, but if I am truly honest the core of my pleasure comes down to hip driven propulsion, its just a mind blower and very addictive (I think I likened it to human flying before).
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 12-23-2011
johnny.widen johnny.widen is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Luleň, Sweden
Posts: 92
johnny.widen
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by westyswoods View Post
I came looking for technique knowing nothing of philosophy. Kaizen has become the driving force in my staying with the technical and slow progress. The journey has been a very positive challenge.
I can just second that!
__________________
My Total Immersion Story
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 12-24-2011
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 647
CoachBobM
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ewa.swimmer View Post
Although you can't totally separate the two I'm curious if more people come to TI because of the philosophy (Kaizen) or the technical aspects (stroke mechanics and SPL). Do they come for one and stay because of the other? Maybe a survey expert could figure out a question that would answer that.
I originally came to TI because:

1) I was trying to improve my swimming speed.

2) I had come to realize the importance of technique in improving swimming speed.

I should add that I hadn't always realized this. I had assumed that once you "knew" how to swim, all you needed to do to get faster was to increase your strength and stamina. (I believe that many swimmers still believe this, and that's why they don't look for a program like Total Immersion.) What changed my belief was a one-hour adult stroke clinic on flipturns at my Y that I attended by mistake.

I already "knew" how to do freestyle flipturns, but couldn't figure out how to do backstroke flipturns. Since the workshop was simply billed as a flipturn stroke clinic, I assumed that they were going to cover both freestyle and backstroke flipturns, and was initially dismayed when the coach said that they were only going to cover freestyle flipturns. But I ended up being very glad I had attended the workshop, because I identified 7 things I had been doing incorrectly.

In those days, the only swimming event I was working on was 800m freestyle. I tried to swim 3 times per week, and had missed one of my regular swim times because I was attending the clinic. And I pretty much wasted the second swim time because I tried, on every turn, to think about all 7 of the things I had learned, and quickly discovered that you can't think about 7 things at once! I had to settle, instead, for working on only 2 of the 7 things until they became habit. But in spite of that, I saw as much improvement in my 800m time in that one week as I had previously been seeing in a month!

So the primary things I learned from the clinic were that (a) you can improve your swimming speeds faster by improving technique than by increasing strength and stamina, and (b) because of this, it's useful to get training in things that you already "know" how to do.

3) My Y didn't have much advanced swim training available for adults, because (a) they believed that you can't train adults and kids together, even if they want to learn the same things, (b) they didn't have enough staff or pool time available to train adults and kids separately, so (c) they only trained kids.

The coach who ran the adult flipturn clinic (and who also coached the kids' swim team) left not long after that, but the Y continued to offer one one-hour stroke clinic per year for adults.

The next one they ran was on freestyle, wasn't well attended, and was more of a smorgasbord of training techniques (complete with kickboards, paddles, and pull buoys) than a well-organized program for teaching freestyle technique. I didn't see any speed improvements, but subsequently developed shoulder problems that actually forced me at one point to stop swimming for 2 or 3 weeks. (Interestingly, a number of kids on their kids' swim team were having shoulder problems around that same time.)

By the following year, I had found Total Immersion, and my shoulder problems were already going away. But it's interesting to note the titles of the adult stroke clinics they ran over the next few years:

year 3: freestyle and flipturns
year 4: front crawl and flipturns
year 5: none
year 6: two one-hour clinics:
- freestyle and backstroke
- breaststroke and butterfly

I had stopped attending their clinics after I found TI, but I actually went to the two clinics in year 6 just to see what they did. The clinics were, for the most part, the TI 4-stroke training program, though they unrealistically tried to compress the long axis and short axis halves of it into one hour each. They never even got to butterfly in the second one, and from talking to my fellow attendees, I gathered that most people were pretty much overwhelmed by the amount of material that was thrown at them.

What was most interesting to me as a competitive swimmer in training was that in six years, they had never gotten around to covering either forward or backstroke starts, and therefore hadn't given anyone enough training to be in their first swim meet! I remember thinking that if they trained their kids the way they were training their adults, the kids would be adults before they were ready to be in their first meet!

I stayed with TI because:

1) I had still not reached my goal of being fastest in the world, and I had realized that improvements in technique were integral to striving toward that goal.

2) I believed that the organization that had successfully developed a program for teaching good technique was likely to be able to give me the best guidance on how to integrate continuing improvements in technique with improvements in strength and stamina so as to continue to improve my swimming times.


Bob

Last edited by CoachBobM : 12-24-2011 at 03:22 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-24-2011
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ewa.swimmer View Post
Although you can't totally separate the two I'm curious if more people come to TI because of the philosophy (Kaizen) or the technical aspects (stroke mechanics and SPL).
My educated guess is that the great majority - possibly 90%+ - come for rather utilitarian reasons.
They can't swim more than a few strokes . . . a few laps . . . or are frustrated at having plateaued . . . or want to try to make sense of conflicting explanations or suggestions.
The experience of finding something that works - then discovering that mindfulness gives it a sense of engagement (swimming's no longer tedious) and purpose that takes it to a realm they never anticipated - leads to appreciation of the holistic or philosophical aspects.

My goal is to more carefully 'curate' the average person's experience with TI to make sure that a greater percentage of the just curious progress to passionately curious.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 12-24-2011
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
1) I had still not reached my goal of being fastest in the world, and I had realized that improvements in technique were integral to striving toward that goal.
Now there's a goal that will never lose its pull!
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 12-24-2011
terry terry is offline
Head Coach
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 2,305
terry has disabled reputation
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by andyinnorway View Post
Amen Amen Amen,
Swimming for me now is as ritual as prayers for certain religions, but if I am truly honest the core of my pleasure comes down to hip driven propulsion,
Andy
Though succinct, this was among the Top 3 pleasure-giving posts I've read this year.
I'll be visiting Sweden for a week or so in early June. I know it's not exactly 'next door' for you, but hope we get to share a swim - and later a nosh - sometime soon.
__________________
Terry Laughlin
Head Coach & Chief Executive Optimist

May your laps be as happy as mine.

My TI Story
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 12-24-2011
Alex-SG Alex-SG is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Dubai
Posts: 415
Alex-SG
Default The Ideal TI Customer?

I have fallen in love with TI since Day 1.

Here are a few reasons...
a. The promise to turn Freestyle swimming into a low effort / high elegance sport. Very different from traditional Freestyle
b. The Fantastic Drill based improvement approach. You build your stroke step-by-step, as if you are building a house
c. The logic behind the TI Stroke. You understand the TI Technique
d. The "A+" enthusiasm & communication skills of Terry Laughlin
e. The positioning of "Bible of Long Distance Freestyle", specifically targeted at Triathletes
f. The passion demonstrated by other TI coaches and TI enthusiasts in this Forum. A real community !

My profile is as follows:
- Like individual sports, specifically in nature (Fishing, Golf, Triathlon)
- Do not like Speed and motor sports
- Like challenging sports from a technique standpoint
- Looking for elegance & grace over speed and top performance
- Like to measure progress according to factual metrics

As a TI Customer, this is what I am after:
1. I bought most of the DVDs and started doing self learning 4 years ago
2. I attended the Introductory TI Workshop Class
3. I Had follow-up fine-tuning 1-1 lessons with TI Coaches
4. I would love to attend a TI Workshop Part II Class (to build on the 1st one)
5. At some point in time I may attempt to become a TI Coach. It's fun.

From a Business Development standpoint I think TI is doing great.
Target the right market, increase the number of new TI enthusiasts...

What I would love to see is:

a. Follow-up workshop options. I felt my TI experience was stalled after the 1st workshop. After EE101, you expect to see a EE201 and EE301 class....

b. A "TI proficiency level system" based on SPL, SR, TIME... something like the Belts in Judo or Handicap in Golf

c. A good Multimedia animation on the TI WEB Site to show exactly the perfect TI Stroke. Could become a Multimedia Computer Based Training

d. The TI Bench available in the TI HQ at least...

ALEX
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 12-26-2011
tab tab is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 171
tab
Default

Interesting how I fit the listed profile, for the most part. Male, mid forties, adult on-set swimmer, etc.

I use swimming as a release from my daily work. Once in the pool I have to focus on the task at hand, I can leave the days work, it is just about the only time I can. Self employed, and I carry work with me most of the day, a lot in my mind. So it is not only physical fitness, but mental fitness, which fits nicely with TI theory.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 10:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.