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  #1  
Old 01-18-2014
Nathaniel Nathaniel is offline
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Nathaniel
Default 2nd Swim Video - Please share advice

Greetings -

I shot this video early today. I've been working hard on my drills and I'm showing some improvement. However, I'm far from where I'd like to be. I plan on training with a TI coach soon, but until then I'd appreciate any advice.

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SXPm5cba3I

Thanks for our help, and Happy Laps.

-Nate
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  #2  
Old 01-19-2014
Nathaniel Nathaniel is offline
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One thing that I've noticed is my legs are splaying, especially on my right side. I don't feel it during my stroke, but it's evident in my video.

Do you have any advice for addressing this issue?
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  #3  
Old 01-22-2014
Danny Danny is offline
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Not sure about this, but that kind of kicking usually seems like a balance issue. It could be connected with raising your head to breath, but I'm not sure of this. Most of us have a preferred leg for kicking, and you can see this asymmetry when you compare your swim going to the right and going to the left on the way back. On the way back, you are actually breaking the water and kicking loud enough so you can hear it on the video. The most active leg is always the left one, but the patterns are different going up and going back. The other possibility, which can also happen on your breathing side, is that you over-rotate and have to kick hard to rotate back in the other direction.

Anyone else who understands these things better than I want to weigh in on this?
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  #4  
Old 01-22-2014
Superfly Superfly is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathaniel View Post
Greetings -
I shot this video early today. I've been working hard on my drills and I'm showing some improvement. However, I'm far from where I'd like to be. I plan on training with a TI coach soon, but until then I'd appreciate any advice.
Hi Nate,

Yes, your breathing is much more relaxed than last time, so that's a great improvement.

However, you seem to be picking up some bad habits. The stroke timing is not exactly front quadrant, but is rushed and not relaxed. Front quadrant means that the working arm is at or above shoulder height (i.e. perpendicular to the surface of the water) when the recovering arm enters the water.

You seem to be rushing the beginning of the stroke, but letting your arm hang back lazily at the end of the stroke (when it is beside your hips). A few drills that may help you avoid this:

1. During the pull phase, bend your elbow so that only the forearm is perpendicular to the water surface. Relax and expend very little effort to do this. Simply let the oncoming water move your forearm into position. Your recovering arm should enter the water at this point.

2. Think power when you get to the push phase and accelerate the entire arm past your body. Don't let your arm stay beside your hip. Use the momentum of the accelerating arm to achieve a quick recovery.

3. Slow down to feel what is going on. If you ice skate then that is the feeling that you're going after when you swim front quadrant Freestyle.

I wouldn't worry about the legs at this point. Once you get your body balanced then your legs wouldn't need to kick so wide to re-balance things. So concentrate on your front quadrant timing and everything should fall into place (hopefully).

Good luck.

Last edited by Superfly : 01-22-2014 at 10:44 PM.
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  #5  
Old 01-23-2014
dprevish dprevish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfly View Post
3. Slow down to feel what is going on. If you ice skate then that is the feeling that you're going after when you swim front quadrant Freestyle.
Superfly,

when you say this you mean the sense of weight shifting, correct?
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  #6  
Old 01-24-2014
Nathaniel Nathaniel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfly View Post
Hi Nate,

Yes, your breathing is much more relaxed than last time, so that's a great improvement.

However, you seem to be picking up some bad habits. The stroke timing is not exactly front quadrant, but is rushed and not relaxed. Front quadrant means that the working arm is at or above shoulder height (i.e. perpendicular to the surface of the water) when the recovering arm enters the water.

You seem to be rushing the beginning of the stroke, but letting your arm hang back lazily at the end of the stroke (when it is beside your hips). A few drills that may help you avoid this:

1. During the pull phase, bend your elbow so that only the forearm is perpendicular to the water surface. Relax and expend very little effort to do this. Simply let the oncoming water move your forearm into position. Your recovering arm should enter the water at this point.

2. Think power when you get to the push phase and accelerate the entire arm past your body. Don't let your arm stay beside your hip. Use the momentum of the accelerating arm to achieve a quick recovery.

3. Slow down to feel what is going on. If you ice skate then that is the feeling that you're going after when you swim front quadrant Freestyle.

Thanks for the historical analysis Superfly. Very Helpful!

When done correctly, should it feel like the pull and the opposite arm entry are one linked motion? As I was working on your tips, I started to get more of this feeling. Does that sound right?

Thanks Again!
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  #7  
Old 01-24-2014
Superfly Superfly is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dprevish View Post
when you say this you mean the sense of weight shifting, correct?
Exactamundo! You want to shift your weight from side to side, but also keep more weight forward. That's why you tilt your body forward when ice skating, and similarly why you don't push until the recovering arm has entered the water.

Last edited by Superfly : 01-24-2014 at 04:13 AM.
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  #8  
Old 01-24-2014
Superfly Superfly is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nathaniel View Post
When done correctly, should it feel like the pull and the opposite arm entry are one linked motion? As I was working on your tips, I started to get more of this feeling. Does that sound right?
Exactly! The shoulders and arms are linked.

Note that TI uses "anchor" to refer to the pull, and "spear" to refer to the arm entry. This analogy places the emphasis on the recovery.

Both analogies are useful. I prefer to focus on the pull, but occasionally focus on the recovery.

No matter what, the recovering arm should enter the water during the pull or "anchor". The push and extension of the opposite arm should be simultaneous. You can practice this at home.
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