Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > O2 in H20: Breathing Skills
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-08-2009
katie.kenny katie.kenny is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3
katie.kenny
Default Breathing in Skating Position

Hi--
I've been swimming all my life, but I never felt I was very good at freestyle. The Freestyle Made Easy dvd has really helped me a lot.

I'm having trouble with breathing in the skating drill, especially on my "vanilla" side. In core balance position, I have no problem at all with breathing. And, when I'm nose down in the skating position, I feel great. I get that blissful, downhill gliding sensation the book talks about. When I rotate past the sweet spot to breathe, it seems like I'm in the right position. Mouth and nose definitely clearing the water, I'm pretty sure I'm rotating far enough. But, it seems like the water that's already on my face drips into my nose when I breathe. Also, I feel a struggling sensation. Like I said, this doesn't happen in core balance or on the other side.

I would appreciate any suggestions.
Thanks,
Katie
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-08-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 820
daveblt
Default

Here's a few tips

Try to relax whole body and relax back to feel support from the water when you roll to air
keep the head in line with spine laser beam pointing to the far wall
Roll the body as a unit to the air
It may feel more comfortable to turn your palm up as you roll

Blow the water away at the surface as your face begins to clear the water , Water may be getting in your nose because your trying to inhale too soon.


Dave
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-09-2009
katie.kenny katie.kenny is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3
katie.kenny
Default Thanks for the help

Wow, thanks for the quick, helpful response! I tried some of your suggestions this morning, and it definitely made a difference. I'm not quite there yet, but it feels like I'm on the right track.

I love the way the TI method isolates each aspect of the stroke, so I can really feel where my problems are. I can tell that the problems I'm having with this drill are the same issues that have always made me feel like I'm struggling while swimming freestyle.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-10-2009
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 402
Rhoda
Default

One other thing you can try is playing around with your lead hand position. Bring it up, pull it down, see what happens to your whole position in the water when you change it. That can affect how close you are to the surface.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-12-2009
elskbrev elskbrev is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 65
elskbrev
Default

Another thing that helps "keep the head in line with spine laser beam pointing to the far wall," as daveblt suggested, is to think of watching the flags behind you or watching the wall past your feet as you roll to air.

Also, as you come up for air, practice breathing out through your nose or nose and mouth at the same time so you don't get water up your nose.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-14-2009
katie.kenny katie.kenny is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3
katie.kenny
Default Much better!

Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm breathing effortlessly in the skating position now. Two things made the most difference: 1.) Continuing to breathe out thru my nose for a moment after my face clears the water. It would have taken me awhile to figure this one out on my own, seems counter-intuitive. It clears away all those stray water droplets, though. 2.) Raising my lead arm and head position a little. I love the feeling of skating with my head a little lower, but it's too hard to breathe that way.

I've also been following the suggestions on alignment. Those didn't help the breathing per se, but I am experiencing a more powerful, rhythmic sensation by rotating my head and body as a single unit. In the DVD, the next step is to do advanced breathing by concentrating more on neck rotation than whole body rotation. This seems like a contradiction to me--thoughts, anyone?
Thanks,
Katie
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-14-2009
atreides atreides is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 293
atreides
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by katie.kenny@gmail.com View Post
Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm breathing effortlessly in the skating position now. Two things made the most difference: 1.) Continuing to breathe out thru my nose for a moment after my face clears the water. It would have taken me awhile to figure this one out on my own, seems counter-intuitive. It clears away all those stray water droplets, though. 2.) Raising my lead arm and head position a little. I love the feeling of skating with my head a little lower, but it's too hard to breathe that way.

I've also been following the suggestions on alignment. Those didn't help the breathing per se, but I am experiencing a more powerful, rhythmic sensation by rotating my head and body as a single unit. In the DVD, the next step is to do advanced breathing by concentrating more on neck rotation than whole body rotation. This seems like a contradiction to me--thoughts, anyone?
Thanks,
Katie
I'm anxious to hear everyones answer to this one. My memory of the Easy Freestyle DVD emphasized rotating to air but also emphasized rotating just enough. My own experience is that you rotate your body followed by a quick neck turn to break the surface and capture a "bite" of air. Actually if I'm doing everything right, I have more time to breathe but since that tends to add drag its best to do it as quickly as possible. I don't recall any emphasis on neck rotation per se. In fact, my neck gets a little sore when I don't rotate enough with my body and try to do too much rotating with my neck. But then again, I count breathing as my single biggest obstacle because either oxygen debt or cowardice prevents me from swimming lap after lap. I can run a 10K and figure out ways to conquer the fatigue and boredom. But when my heart rate jumps to 130 (est.), I can't wait to get to the wall on a 50 meter leisurely swim. So maybe I'm not the best person to answer this question.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-15-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 820
daveblt
Default

[quote=atreides;4367]I'm anxious to hear everyones answer to this one. My memory of the Easy Freestyle DVD emphasized rotating to air but also emphasized rotating just enough. My own experience is that you rotate your body followed by a quick neck turn to break the surface and capture a "bite" of air. Actually if I'm doing everything right, I have more time to breathe but since that tends to add drag its best to do it as quickly as possible.}


Turning to breathe does not add drag . As long as the body remains streamline it should be like a non breathing stroke.


Dave
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-16-2009
Mike from NS Mike from NS is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 551
Mike from NS
Default ...just a tiny bit farther

Katie

Check out: Looking back as you breathe.... by Syzygy in O2 in H20: Breathing Skills and read Terry's post, #14, in this thread. He offers some valuable clarifications. The following part is what has greatly helped me :

"2) The head moves in synch with the torso most of the way. Your chin and sternum should remain aligned for 90% of the rotation to air. But right at the end of the rotation, the torso stops and the head moves just a tiny bit farther."

Hope this helps!

Mike
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 06:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.