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  #1  
Old 12-06-2012
nurledge nurledge is offline
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nurledge
Default please coach me

Dear coaches, experience swimmers, and the rest,

I would really appreciate if you could provide solution to my swimming. My daughter helped me to capture it for the first time; and i just realize how bad i need to improve my freestyle. of course this is the product of self-coach. TI is my main reference and i would like to take this opportunity to thank Terry and IT coaches for all knowledge in swimming. I hope in 3 months, i will submit my next video and hope that your comment and guidance could improve my swimming.

Thanks in advance.

here is the link:

http://youtu.be/2f0aKJ3HMjM
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  #2  
Old 12-06-2012
daveblt daveblt is offline
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The first thing you need to work on is balance . Your head position is too high. Lean in and look towards the bottom and not straight ahead .The top of your head should always point towards the far wall. When you go to breathe you raise your head even more and it's causing your legs to scissor .Once your more balanced and able to relax more into the water you should be able to swim with more of a glide and not a constant churning of the arms . Your left hand on recovery is also too high above the surface of the water .On recovery your fingertips should be just a hair over the water .Your arm entry seems pretty good right in front of the shoulder . You could even try going a bit wider to see if it makes you feel more stable .

Dave
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  #3  
Old 12-06-2012
tomoy tomoy is offline
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Welcome Haji - the video is a fine start, both for your daughter's videography and your freestyle. For so early in the process, you have surprisingly good timing with your kick.

I'm seeing a lot of energy and propulsion leaping you up and forward. It's probably taking a ton of energy. So start with the basics. Relax towards floating and gliding. Less leaping surging. Learn to do Superman Glide. Find your Skate position and get comfortable there. Then tame your kick - it's much to big.

You want to move towards making your body look like a kayak in the water. Long hull from the tips of leading hand's fingers, to the tip of your toes.

I'll look forward to your March video!
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2012
nurledge nurledge is offline
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Thanks Dave and Tomoy for the reply.

if i were to prioritize the problems; yes, my head position is no 1 & i will remember kayak move in my next jump. Thanks Dave&Tomoy for the remedies.
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  #5  
Old 12-07-2012
boken boken is offline
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Hi Haji. I completely agree with the advice given. You have some video to look and are brave enough to share it with us; your progress will continue to be quick.

I always seem to offer the same advice to beginners because it helped me so much in my self-coaching: take video regularly even just for your own review, and practice those superman glides.

Dave and Tomoy have already given excellent observations and advice so I am just going to add a few ideas on how to practice what was already said.

Practice superman glides a lot. This will teach you how to stay horizontal in the water without using your hands or arms to keep you flat. In this position you can also practice keeping your head in line and the balance you learn will reduce the need for such a huge kick to maintain balance and initiate rotation. If you pause the video sometime during your kick you will see your leg way out from the 'streamline' of your upper body. This is causing a lot of drag and one reason why you stop and surge. Trying to quiet the kick before learning balance is tough since big kicks are a natural response to unbalance. Work on balance first and quieting the kick second. Try push-offs from the wall and try the glides without kicking. You can tell when you are getting better by the distance you are able to go on each push off and whether you start to feel your butt and heels touch air. The more air the better because that means you are flat when you feel air there. You will have to experiment with your stomach muscles and your shoulder blades/arm position to find the places that seem to do best. These body parts seem to have a lot of effect on your balance. For me, light tone in the stomach and shoulderblades up toward my head work best.

Learning to keep the head in line might be easier if you practice many short sets without breathing. Maybe try kicking off from the wall into superman glide. Then after you feel stable, do a some strokes without breathing and then stop and stand up. Turn back to the wall, breathe, and repeat. There is no need to go all the way to the opposite wall. I give this advice because breathing itself can be quite tricky and it adds a lot of complexity when you already have a lot of things to concentrate on. Once your head is used to being straight without stroking, you may have an easier time keeping it there on the breath.

Good luck and have fun!
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  #6  
Old 12-07-2012
nurledge nurledge is offline
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Thanks a lots Boken for valuable advice. I was in the pool today and decided to not swim from wall to wall anymore, and go back to basic or work on balance as pointed by Dave&Tomoy. but i forgot about superman glide lol. So for the rest of the year, i will spend most on basic drills and will hit wall2wall only feel or differentiate the progress. Thanks guys.
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  #7  
Old 12-13-2012
nurledge nurledge is offline
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dear coaches,

At fish or skating position, when i m doing flutter kicks, should
i kick the lower leg bigger then the upper one or equal amount?

Thanks in advance.

Last edited by nurledge : 12-13-2012 at 06:17 AM.
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  #8  
Old 12-13-2012
CoachMatHudson CoachMatHudson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nurledge View Post
dear coaches,

At fish or skating position, when i m doing flutter kicks, should
i kick the lower leg bigger then the upper one or equal amount?

Thanks in advance.
Hey Nurledge,

The kick pattern is dependent on the objective - if you want to use it to move you forward then it might be shaped one way, and if you want to use it to provide just enough lift to the heavy legs while drilling then a different pattern. In balance and streamline drills forward propulsion is not the main objective, and a malformed or excessive kick can actually be counterproductive to the skill being trained for.

In Skate of Fish drilling position one of the primary objectives is to develop stable rotational balance by learning to recognize and control core muscle units, in abs and along the spine and across the back. If your kick pattern is sideways, (horizontal scissors) then this is a strong clue that the legs are being used to hold balance instead of the core. So in drill positions like this we advise doing short repeats without a kick or short repeats with the most minimal vertical kick.

Since you are at an angle in Skate position this vertical kick is not symmetrical. The feet are oscillating around each other a little like the Ying-Yang symbol (or Cresent Moons, depending on which cultural symbol you prefer). But the kick is as gentle as possible. It is helpful to image kicking (or flicking) just from the ankles, not the knees nor the hips.

As you progress in kicking skill, eventually you will learn to kick one leg at a time, independent of the other, which is the basis of the 2 Beat Kick. Instead of Scissors where each leg is moving to counter-balancing the other, neither leg movement disrupts balance and therefore one ankle can flick while the other holds long, relaxed streamline position. A vertical kick is the first step in that direction since it is no longer needed to help with rotational balance. Second step is to minimize the kick. The third step is to 'disconnect' the legs from having to move at the same time. Etc. That can be another discussion.

One purpose for gliding with no kick and switching from Superman to Skate position is that it exposes how well the swimmer can tune in and hold on to that rotated position using only the muscles, spine, which compose 'the frame' of the torso, and not the movement of legs or arms. Initially, swimmers new to core stability in water will glide into Skate position for about 1 seconds and then fall flat again or start kicking the legs sideways to keep holding that position. And this is quite normal - the swimmers are frustrated and embarrassed, but I am not impatient or discouraged as the teacher. It's just part of the process. The point is that everyone has these core muscles but have not learned to rely upon them for the stability. That's what we're doing in the first phase of these drills.

The process of training the neuro-muscular system is incremental. So I encourage new (to these drills or concepts) students to keep at it but notice that the first time maybe you can hold it only 1/2 second. Then next time 3/4 second. After several repeats the swimmer, with great concentration can hold it maybe 3 seconds without falling flat or activating a kick (or before the legs sink). Literally, brain cells being born, stimulated and programmed while you do this. By understanding how the brain needs to learn such complex tasks we recognize this 'patient' small-bite, incremental training process as a much more effective way of developing each part of the body position and stroke control. In the beginning it is slow, careful, but in the end the learning is faster and the imprinting is deep. This is part of what we mean by the phrase, "Slow down in order to go faster."

Maybe that was overkill to your question, but these are things that can get explained more easily in person in a workshop setting, and I am becoming more and more aware of the challenges swimmers face in self-coaching.

If we understand what the specific objective is for the drill then we can get a better idea of what each part surrounding that drill position should do to support the objective.
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~ Mat Hudson

Head Coach
Mediterra International Swimming
mediterraswim.com

My blog with over 400 posts on TI technique and mindful training: Smooth Strokes Blog

Email: mat@mediterraswim.com

Last edited by CoachMatHudson : 12-13-2012 at 08:48 AM.
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  #9  
Old 12-13-2012
nurledge nurledge is offline
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Thanks a lots coach. I'm reading many times for the values given. Also re-reading the article below from your link, digesting the principles in drill/training.

http://www.mediterraswim.com/trainin...uidelines.html
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  #10  
Old 12-13-2012
tomoy tomoy is offline
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Coach Mat - congratulations and thank you for your work on the mediterraswim site. It's a great collection and distillation of TI. Love the youtube demos - we learn a lot watching how the coaches do it. It's inspiring.

FYI, it looks like the "Superman to Skate Position - underwater side view" points to the front view. Thx again.
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