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  #1  
Old 03-19-2010
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Default Swimming as slowly as possible

Another useful drill. Does anyone else do this? I find it helps me confront the 'fear' of unbalancing while reaching with the spearing hand and rolling with the torso. When you spear correctly you never, in fact, lose balance, but it's surprising how ingrained the fear of doing so seems to be!
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Old 03-19-2010
archipelago archipelago is offline
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if You mean slowly swimming=slow SR, I'm trying to practice this using my tempo trainer by increasing the frequency during the set, e.g. each 100m I add 0,1s up to the maximum... for instance my current maximum is 2,3s
... but on my opinion, at the end everyone has his limit when "the physics beats the technique"
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Old 03-19-2010
Alex-SG Alex-SG is offline
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Agree with you Archipelago.
Slow motion swimming is great but how SLOW can one go?

I can still manage to swim at SR=2.0, SR=2.1 but, as highlighted in a previous post, keeping balance becomes impossible with a 2BK at slower SR.

ALEX
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Old 03-19-2010
atreides atreides is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lawrence View Post
Another useful drill. Does anyone else do this? I find it helps me confront the 'fear' of unbalancing while reaching with the spearing hand and rolling with the torso. When you spear correctly you never, in fact, lose balance, but it's surprising how ingrained the fear of doing so seems to be!
Just today I began to think that part of my problem was that I swam too fast. Another swimmer as much as told me that yesterday. As you state, the fear is that I would become unbalanced. But I think part of the problem was that I was tired of having the good swimmers catch up to and blow by me. That doesn't happen too much anymore so maybe I have gotten faster. Today I decided to try to swim a little slower. It was after my run so the results were mixed. Surprisingly I didn't feel like I was losing balance so that was a plus. The big problem with swimming slowly (or at least my problem) is that I glide more and therefore breathe less frequently. It seems the energy gains are ofset by the loss of oxygen. If I could figure that out I would have this whipped. When I first started running, I ran really slow (about an 11 minute mile). As I gained stamina (and lost weight) I got to where I could do an respectable 8:45 for a 10K and even faster for a 5k. But swimming slowly and not losing the oxygen eludes me. Tomorrow is swim day. So I will give it a whirl when I'm fresh and see if I can find a pace similar that which I found when I first started running. You know that pace that you feel like you could run all day at. So is that how you swim? Or are you at a rate where you're pretty fast and can do it all day.
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  #5  
Old 03-20-2010
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Certainly not able to swim all day long but that is the objective.

But I don't try swimming as slowly as possible in order to find a speed at which I could keep going all day. I assume that with a proper understanding of the stroke it should be possible to swim all day at a higher speed. Think of Terry and his 26-mile swims.

The slow swimming drill is something I do to check balance and symmetry. The thought is that if I can swim very slowly, it should be possible to do the same thing at higher speeds, giving me the widest possible range of speeds to choose from without sacrificing form.

In addition, I want to be sure that my normal-speed swimming isn't serving to obscure flaws in my technique. Slower swimming means more time to reflect on every part of the stroke, so in theory fewer places to hide inefficiencies. I suppose it's my way of following Terry's advice to be pro active in seeking out imperfections in one's stroke and addressing them, rather than turning a blind eye.
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Old 04-17-2010
Lawrence Lawrence is offline
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Just to say that Terry has a recent entry on this topic in his blog.
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  #7  
Old 04-18-2010
daveblt daveblt is offline
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Swimming slowly is also part of my routine .What I practice sometimes is pushing off the wall in superman glide nice and relaxed, stretched out looking at the bottom taking a mental note of how good balance feels and then each stroke I take after that is a roll just enough to each side with the same stretched out feeling . As the recovery hand slowly comes around and is about to enter the water I pause just for a second. That second plus the slow relaxed recovery gives me a good mental check on my balance, body position and that I am now going to spear into the water and anchor my hand to pull at the same time .What is probably even better is doing this in zen switch first dragging your hand through the water which will naturally slow your recovery down a bit. Then after that increasing your speed in whole stroke to normal speed and maintaining the same feeling. This will also give you a feeling of keeping your core movements ahead of your arm movements .


Dave
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Old 04-19-2010
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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I also swim very, very slowly regularly. And like Lawrence I regard that being a drill and not swimming. Actually the point I am doing that is to improve the balance. After I saw on a video that I was over-rotating and doing the scissors like leg movement, I used extremely slow strokes to improve the balance. So, after superman glide, core balance and spear switching (my usual suspects to start a session in the pool) I did the following: assuming spearing position, flutter kicking until I feel relaxed, start one slow Zen switch, stop kicking, do one stroke and then glide until I come to a fullstop almost. Get up and start gliding again, doing the same thing on the other side. When I do that I notice every little lack of balance, and found it a great help in gaining a good balance.
Next step then is doing a lap with Zen switches, fingers sliding in the water surface, and doing very slow strokes. Sometimes I get down to 12 strokes in 25 m pool. From there I do laps with increasing or 'normal' stroke rates.

Why should you loose balance when swimming slowly, or being afraid of it ? If you just drill it you do not loose your balance and then there is nothing to be afraid of.
When you glide in superman glide until you stop completely, and your legs are still up, you can do very slow strokes without loosing your balance. Actually you are doing a long glide after the stroke anyway, so the difference to superman glide is not so big, I believe.
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  #9  
Old 04-19-2010
forests forests is offline
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Default Pre-Swim Drills

I agree with the last post on drilling before beginning freestyle in a workout. I usually do about 100 yds. of drills prior to whole stroke with a mix of 1)superman glide with kick, 2) rotation/balance drill with arms on sides with breathing and 3) spear switch. Today, on a whim, I did 200 yds. of drills and I could not believe the difference! My whole stroke felt truly effortless with good balance, rotation and glide. I think the additional yardage of drills especially with the last one being spear switch, pushed me into another relaxation zone and even after 2,000 yards, I did not want to quit! A first for me. But with that being said, how do you prepare for an ow swim/race when you don't have time to do drills?
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  #10  
Old 04-19-2010
ski-pov ski-pov is offline
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"This will also give you a feeling of keeping your core movements ahead of your arm movements ."
this is i think the definitive point of this post and for ti swimming is the key as i understand it,and hello eyeryone!
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