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  #1  
Old 01-29-2017
bujanglokal
 
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Default how do you feel the proper head position by yourself?

No coach, no video (no TI coach in my country, the nearest one is in Singapore). Just yourself in the swimming pool. Is it by feeling the drag? Eyes position whether it is seeing the side of the pool or slightly upward to the back? Some part of the goggle still inside the water (if not fully one inside, one outside water)? Is it by not feeling that the head is pushed upward when the non-recovery hand is starting to move downward to pull?
This weekend I did two swim sessions but still not feeling that the head position is good enough or at least consistent.

Thanks
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  #2  
Old 01-30-2017
efdoucette efdoucette is offline
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efdoucette
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I am not a coach but I did read a post recently that suggested forcing your face a little low then by releasing it, it will move to a neutral position, relax the neck muscles. Try it a few times, it may help. Sorry, that's all I have.
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  #3  
Old 01-30-2017
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Excellent advice, press face down and then release all tension in neck, head and spine will align naturally. You can also go the other extreme, look forward - then release tension and drop the head. Do both extremes in drill and freestyle. Start out in neutral posture for a few strokes, then look forward for a few strokes, and finally release the head for remaining strokes of the length. Going correct to incorrect then correcting imprints the correct head-spine alignment.

Perception is a major component. Swimmers that have been looking forward, tense neck and shoulders have difficulty releasing tension in neck and shoulders aligning head and spine. Often I ask swimmers to "tuck the chin to the chest" - extreme perception. They feel their chin is tucked almost touching their chest, uncomfortable, feels wrong. Reality is the head and spine are in perfect alignment, chin not tucked toward chest. Perception and reality are usually at complete odds especially in the water.

Go to both head position extremes and discover where your body is most stable, legs light with shoulders and neck soft and relaxed.

Stuart
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  #4  
Old 01-30-2017
fooboo fooboo is offline
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fooboo
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I found the best for me was to put a head on a "pillow".
It helps staying balanced, with legs high. Also, breathing,
just to rotate head as I would out of the pool. No tricks,
to special movements. Just simple turn.
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  #5  
Old 01-31-2017
CoachBillGreentree CoachBillGreentree is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachStuartMcDougal View Post
Excellent advice, press face down and then release all tension in neck, head and spine will align naturally. You can also go the other extreme, look forward - then release tension and drop the head. Do both extremes in drill and freestyle. Start out in neutral posture for a few strokes, then look forward for a few strokes, and finally release the head for remaining strokes of the length. Going correct to incorrect then correcting imprints the correct head-spine alignment.

Perception is a major component. Swimmers that have been looking forward, tense neck and shoulders have difficulty releasing tension in neck and shoulders aligning head and spine. Often I ask swimmers to "tuck the chin to the chest" - extreme perception. They feel their chin is tucked almost touching their chest, uncomfortable, feels wrong. Reality is the head and spine are in perfect alignment, chin not tucked toward chest. Perception and reality are usually at complete odds especially in the water.

Go to both head position extremes and discover where your body is most stable, legs light with shoulders and neck soft and relaxed.

Stuart
For much of my swimming I was in the category Coach Stuart mentions of tense neck, looking forward etc. I find the exercise he describe very good for both myself when I feel things getting out of place and my students. Give it a try and let us know how it works out.

If you have an excuse to take a holiday up in Singapore, drop the guys in Singapore a note. It'll be worth the price I'm sure.
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  #6  
Old 02-01-2017
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CoachStuartMcDougal CoachStuartMcDougal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBillGreentree View Post
For much of my swimming I was in the category Coach Stuart mentions of tense neck, looking forward etc. I find the exercise he describe very good for both myself when I feel things getting out of place and my students. Give it a try and let us know how it works out.

If you have an excuse to take a holiday up in Singapore, drop the guys in Singapore a note. It'll be worth the price I'm sure.
Hey Coach Bill. Likewise for me too, a lot of time looking forward with imbalanced vessel. I execute the extreme position reset after a long open water swim too. Sighting forward, slicing under chop, some tension returns and head drifts up a bit. A neutral posture is not always obvious - in reality :-)
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