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  #11  
Old 06-29-2013
craig.arnold@gmail.com craig.arnold@gmail.com is offline
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Charles is completely correct, but...

It just so happens TI knows this very well.

There are two TI videos that can be used very well with kids.

Happy Laps is a series of games and activities much like Charles describes, and then First Strokes is great for the next steps.

My 9yo daughter holds her own in 1-2 hours practice a week with her classmates who are swimming club members doing 6-10 hours practice. She has the best freestyle stroke because that's the only thing I've really been working on with her.

Of course at some point the extra practice of the club kids will let them pull away, and Lauren isn't really a super-keen swimmer, but she is getting very good at stroke analysis from the videos I watch. It won't be long before she can come on a weekend workshop. :)
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  #12  
Old 06-29-2013
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CoachMandyMcDougal CoachMandyMcDougal is offline
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I'm very excited you raised this topic!

Currently I have been teaching and coaching age group swimmers full time at the college of San Mateo using the TI method. I have taken children who have never swam freestyle and adapted the techniques of TI to fit a progressive model that works very well. Unlike adults that I continue to teach there is no set of habits or tension that has to be shut off in order to advance through the skill. But there is a very direct and easy approach to teaching this method to children it's only a matter of understanding the components and how it is easily interpreted to a child.

I wrote a blog months back ( I will include the link in this reply) which included brief parts of my book on how to teach your child the foundations to successful swimming. I myself was a instructor for over 8 years before ever becoming a TI coach and I have learned the traditional method including the flaws behind it, my own method ( by trial and error), and TI. As far as the traditional method goes, do not use kick boards for anything it only imprints bad habits that they should not be creating at that time.

July 17th I will have easy to read, informative, and interesting ebook on TI for children and how to advance them the correct way without regressing them. I hope you find this blog helpful and if you have any other questions feel free to let me know.

http://www.totalimmersion.net/blog/t.../#.Uc8NcXy9KK0

Good luck to your child's progress and to your swimming as well. You've come to the right place :)

Happy laps,

Coach Mandy

Last edited by CoachMandyMcDougal : 06-29-2013 at 10:04 PM. Reason: Fix URL
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  #13  
Old 06-30-2013
CoachBobM CoachBobM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rincewind View Post
My 5yr old just started swimming lessons, and they are doing the traditional airplane float, torpedo kick, kickboard kicking, kickboard with alternating pulling, catch up drill... and so on. My daughter is currently at the torpedo kicking stage.

I am just wondering if there is even such a thing as TI for kids? All materials that I am seeing are aimed at adults.
I have been a TI coach for about a decade and have taught TI techniques to kids as young as 5. I know that there are TI coaches who have taught kids a bit younger than that.

TI is better known for training adults than for training kids, and I think there are a couple of reasons for that. First, swim training for adults at other than the most elementary levels has historically been a vast wasteland, and it's a lot easier to become recognized in a marketplace where there aren't any established players. Second, in my experience adults are willing to travel farther on the average to get swim training for themselves than families are willing to travel to get swim training for their kids, and that was a major obstacle back in the days when there were relatively few TI coaches and when TI training was therefore only being offered in certain centralized locations.

But TI has, for as long as I've been acquainted with it, been involved in training kids. When I attended a TI workshop in February of 1999, 3 of the 20 attendees were kids (aged 13, 11, and 9). And I did my internship as a TI coach at a TI kids' camp attended by about 60 swimmers ranging in age from 8 to 16.

In my experience, training teenagers isn't significantly different from training adults (they're as likely as adults to have deeply engrained bad muscle memories and they tend to respond to cognitive verbal instruction in much the same way that adults do). But young kids tend to learn more by imitation, role-play, and feeling. So while an adult or teenager will equate "Superman Glide" with a set of verbal instructions and a visual image of a TI coach demonstrating the drill, and 5-year-old is more likely to hear it as "We're going to imitate Superman" (which may be fine as long as you explain that Superman is flying with his head down because he wants to look at the ground below him). Some coaches find that it works better to call the Skate drill the Swordfish drill for much the same reason. And at times, you may have to use tricks, or even physically adjust their bodies, to allow them to get the feeling of what it's like to be in the correct position.

You should also be aware that TI has a special training program for true beginners (i.e., people of all ages who have never learned basic water skills), which is outlined in the Happy Laps DVD, and it sounds like that may be a more appropriate starting point for your 5-year-old. The goal of this DVD was to provide an alternative to traditional "learn to swim" training, so that people don't have to waste time learning bad swimming habits that they will then need to unlearn in order to become good swimmers. Once your 5-year-old has mastered these basic skills, you should be able to take her through the drills in the DVDs for the various strokes (freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly), though you may need to be a little more flexible about how you present the material.

The First Strokes DVD is aimed specifically at kids who have already been through conventional training in the four competitive strokes and who have already learned bad habits that need to be corrected.


Bob

Last edited by CoachBobM : 06-30-2013 at 12:47 AM.
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  #14  
Old 06-30-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachBobM View Post
.

TI is better known for training adults than for training kids,

Bob
Hi CoachBob,

You make a very good point. Yes I agree, TI was intended for adults for the primary reason there were no swim workshops for adults, specifically those who are new to swimming (i.e. the ‘adult onset swimmer’).I have had great success teaching and coaching children from the ages of 2years to 9 years implementing the foundations of TI with balance, streamlining, and eventually focal points in freestyle. What I have found is the best way for a child swimmer to excel, is to get them in the water as EARLY as possible while avoiding certain traditional tools that imprint poor positioning and balance. Fortunately, I have had the opportunity to be a swim coach for the Bulldog Swim Team and emphasize daily to the kids how to practice superman glide, skate (L/R), and focal points with their freestyle and other strokes and they LOVE it! I teach and address children the same way as adults except with children I introduce games with the same drills. What I found is that children really enjoy repetition and achieving a level of success that makes them feel confident both physically and mentally.


When I give them one focal point, for whole stroke or drill, it keeps them completely engaged and more physically aware of how their body reacts in the water and you will be surprised at how focused they are especially children who battle with attention deficit disorder. For example, a focal point I would give for skating is, “keep your hands in your ‘pocket’ don’t lose all your quarters!” It becomes a fun game for them and in the process they execute the drill well and are comfortable in doing so. That being said, I think the primary goal for children in swimming is to help them establish a perspective of creating goals, remaining focused, and having fun with it. What has been a success for me as a coach is to observe daily each child establishing a level of intent and telling me specifically what they felt worked well in their swimming (i.e. they felt more balanced). It is very cool to see and definitely a rewarding experience. I encourage all TI coaches to consider coaching children TI methods and philosophies.

Happy swimming,

Mandy
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  #15  
Old 07-01-2013
Rajan Rajan is offline
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There is a coach in Hong Kong. Her name is Sandra. She is an excellent swimmer. She teaches children TI swimming too. Her Website is http://www.floatplus.hk. She can also be contacted for the query.

Last edited by Rajan : 07-01-2013 at 05:08 AM.
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  #16  
Old 07-01-2013
Rincewind Rincewind is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rajan View Post
There is a coach in Hong Kong. Her name is Sandra. She is an excellent swimmer. She teaches children TI swimming too. Her Website is http://www.floatplus.hk. She can also be contacted for the query.
Hong Kong is a bit out of my daily commute range, lol.

I am in Marin County, California, are there any TI coaches in my area that have programs catering for kids?
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  #17  
Old 07-01-2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rincewind View Post
Hong Kong is a bit out of my daily commute range, lol.

I am in Marin County, California, are there any TI coaches in my area that have programs catering for kids?
Rincewind,

How far are you from San Mateo?
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  #18  
Old 07-01-2013
Rincewind Rincewind is offline
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San Mateo is about 1hr to 1:15min drive, a bit further than I can afford to go...

When I was doing a search for swim schools I was looking at anything north of Golden Gate bridge.
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  #19  
Old 07-01-2013
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CoachMandyMcDougal CoachMandyMcDougal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rincewind View Post
San Mateo is about 1hr to 1:15min drive, a bit further than I can afford to go...

When I was doing a search for swim schools I was looking at anything north of Golden Gate bridge.
I am willing to make it your way if you have a pool and if you know of anyone else that would like a lesson. Group sessions for children work really well. Go ahead and contact mindbodyandswim@gmail.com and im sure we can work something out. Most importantly , I can have you there to learn how to keep your child progressing further without fully relying on a coach! :)

I look forward to hopefully working with you

Best,


Coach M
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  #20  
Old 07-02-2013
CoachDavidShen CoachDavidShen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachMandyMcDougal View Post
I'm very excited you raised this topic!

Currently I have been teaching and coaching age group swimmers full time at the college of San Mateo using the TI method. I have taken children who have never swam freestyle and adapted the techniques of TI to fit a progressive model that works very well. Unlike adults that I continue to teach there is no set of habits or tension that has to be shut off in order to advance through the skill. But there is a very direct and easy approach to teaching this method to children it's only a matter of understanding the components and how it is easily interpreted to a child.

I wrote a blog months back ( I will include the link in this reply) which included brief parts of my book on how to teach your child the foundations to successful swimming. I myself was a instructor for over 8 years before ever becoming a TI coach and I have learned the traditional method including the flaws behind it, my own method ( by trial and error), and TI. As far as the traditional method goes, do not use kick boards for anything it only imprints bad habits that they should not be creating at that time.

July 17th I will have easy to read, informative, and interesting ebook on TI for children and how to advance them the correct way without regressing them. I hope you find this blog helpful and if you have any other questions feel free to let me know.

http://www.totalimmersion.net/blog/t.../#.Uc8NcXy9KK0

Good luck to your child's progress and to your swimming as well. You've come to the right place :)

Happy laps,

Coach Mandy

I for one am looking forward to this ebook!
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