Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 05-03-2013
Janos Janos is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Liverpool, England
Posts: 389
Janos
Default

Am I alone in thinking this is another attempt by SS to mock the credibility of another swim school?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-03-2013
machelett machelett is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 68
machelett
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Janos View Post
Am I alone in thinking this is another attempt by SS to mock the credibility of another swim school?
I'm puzzled. Which school promotes crossing over, letting the legs sink, and lifting the head to breathe?
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-03-2013
Janos Janos is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Liverpool, England
Posts: 389
Janos
Default

Sorry, I meant to specify the overglider.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-03-2013
CoachJohnB's Avatar
CoachJohnB CoachJohnB is offline
Coach
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 162
CoachJohnB
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Janos View Post
Am I alone in thinking this is another attempt by SS to mock the credibility of another swim school?
I don't think that is what SS is doing with the swimtypes. I think they are trying to illustrate the most common types of freestyle that they have seen over the years.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-03-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,244
CharlesCouturier
Default

At some point, and I don't think it has changed much, 48% of all swim guides sold were OGs. It's a public health issue, not a marketing pitch.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-03-2013
machelett machelett is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 68
machelett
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Janos View Post
Sorry, I meant to specify the overglider.
I know. I just wanted to illustrate the absurdity of narrowing the classification down to just what you consider offensive and then perceive that isolated characteristic as mockery.
I believe I find myself in the Bambino category and if I wanted to take offense, that'd be more reason than being called an overglider.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-03-2013
Rincewind Rincewind is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 340
Rincewind
Default

I think its really easy to fall into the overglider trap seeing how the term 'glide' is used by pretty much all swim schools.

I'd even venture to say that every self-coached swimmer has been down that path at some point.

So, no, I don't think its an attempt at mockery.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05-03-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,244
CharlesCouturier
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rincewind View Post
I'd even venture to say that every self-coached swimmer has been down that path at some point.
I can not say otherwise, since it very well depicts what my own path as a swimmer has been. I went through years of overgliding.

In fact at SwimSmooth (in spite of not being certified, worth mentioning), I am probably one of the most overgliding friendly. I acknowledge that there are some benefits of doing this on purpose, and have constantly stated that as long as you can do otherwise when need be, there's nothing wrong overgliding at training, quite the opposite.

The more you overglide, the more it increases torque per stroke, which then brings every single pulling effort much closer to the torque you would typically generate whilst racing.

This technique is often used by sprinters, with great success.

I think, to contradict Janos, that it says a lot on the respect I have for this form of training.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05-03-2013
Janos Janos is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Liverpool, England
Posts: 389
Janos
Default

What I am struggling with, absurd as it may seem to some, is that there are many swimsmooth demo videos on youtube. All of the swimmers being competitive and fast, but each showing various idiosyncracies in their strokes, similar to the caricatures shown. The defining characteristic being a high stroke rate. A subject that is repeated constantly on the website and videos. My point is that most on this forum would concede that a high stroke rate is needed for sprint races, so there is no problem there, but we also use the TI style for distance swimming. Both are relevant proven techniques, yet the author of swim types is subtly trying to claim more relevance for muscle power over technique for all purposes.

Janos
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 05-03-2013
CharlesCouturier CharlesCouturier is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,244
CharlesCouturier
Default

Hi Janos

I'm in total respect for your point of view, obviously. And I don't think the competition needs me to defend them, so I'll avoid this.

Here are a few semi random statements/anecdotes...

My experience on the Grand Prix circuit (which belongs to the past now, though I'm back on the FINA World Cub circuit this year) tells me that in order to be successful, one must have a Sweet Spot rate above 70, closer to 80 if you're a lady (over the distance you have to achieve, which in my days was typically either 25, 32 or 40some kilos).

The other day, I was fortunate enough to look at a triathlon world cup event, full reportage that is. I found out that all athletes, regardless of the category were winding at above 80 rpm.
(http://www.totalimmersion.net/forum/...ghlight=trivia)

Last and not least. I had heard that there was a very fast distance swimmer training at our University (at least according to the CIS standards, as he did 15:24 this year). Had never met him. Some day I was casual chatting on the deck, and I notice a loner in Lane 8. Good technique. As always, I count the strokes. 16-17 per 25m. Good technique though. So this indicated a very sound swimmer, but 16-17? Man I can do that (as a 50ml/kg/min extraweak chicken wings swimmer). I can even train on 15-16 without never dying. I look at the coach, and go "Is he the One?" He says yes.

That guy was winding a bunch of kilos I believe, on a rate that was probably higher than 80rpm, at training, since he was preparing for Open Water.

So it's not entirely true to believe that rate only serves sprinters. Some ultra distance guys have built their success at these higher rates.

Last edited by CharlesCouturier : 05-03-2013 at 10:41 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.