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  #1  
Old 05-27-2009
Jay Jay is offline
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Jay
Default Crowded Pool

How do you deal with turbulence created by other swimmers? How do you stay "sturdy" in the water?

When I have to swim next to a person who is into gadgets(fins, paddles) or to power plow-er, I lose balance in the water. I really feel side push created by other swimmer. And the water feels thicker too. It makes me tired sooner and is no fun at all. Is it because I am a small guy (5'5", 125lbs)? Or my style of swimming(rather slow and long glide)?
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Old 05-27-2009
eddiewouldgo eddiewouldgo is offline
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I hate crowded lanes too. Not half as much fun. Try to find a time when the pool is not crowded. After 7 p.m. most every pool in my town is still open, and they are all but empty. Otherwise, you just have to cowboy up and make the best of it.
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Old 05-27-2009
naj naj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay View Post
How do you deal with turbulence created by other swimmers? How do you stay "sturdy" in the water?

When I have to swim next to a person who is into gadgets(fins, paddles) or to power plow-er, I lose balance in the water. I really feel side push created by other swimmer. And the water feels thicker too. It makes me tired sooner and is no fun at all. Is it because I am a small guy (5'5", 125lbs)? Or my style of swimming(rather slow and long glide)?
Your size has nothing to do with it, Jay. But being in a crowded pool can be very distracting. Remember to concentrate on your stroke when these sorts of distractions arise. For instance, see if your recovery arm has a high elbow and your forearm is relaxed, spearing the water fingertips, forearm, then elbow back into the water.

Keep that head down staring at the black line, head spine alignment. Make sure to keep your lead hand out in front of you just outside your shoulder line to keep you from sinking and remember that your recovery side shoulder should barely break the surface confirming that you are skating along rather than swimming flat. These things should help you stay balanced. Although I no longer swim in the pool, in open water I deal with currents and ebb tide so remembering and practicing these things really help me out a lot.

Your slow and relaxed way of doing things is wise, the harder you try to push through rather than using what the water gives you, the easier you tire out. Hope this helps you.

Keep swimming!
Naji
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  #4  
Old 05-28-2009
Jay Jay is offline
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Thank you for responding to my whining...
I guess I just have to get used to sharing a lane in a crowded pool.
FOCUS, FOCUS and FOCUS!
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  #5  
Old 05-29-2009
Rhoda Rhoda is offline
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On the bright side, it's good preparation for the waves and chop of open water, should you be inclined to head outdoors for a swim.
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  #6  
Old 05-29-2009
freshegg freshegg is offline
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I often find that I actually swim faster when I'm sharing a lane with several other swimmers, IF they are of equal (or better) ability to mine. I think this is partly because I end up swimming on another swimmer's draft, and partly because I end up challenging myself more than I do if I am alone in a lane. I qualify that with that "IF" because this only happens when the lane is occupied by serious swimmers who pay attention to the others with whom they are sharing the lane.

I do agree, though, that the turbulence created by other swimmers with "apparatus", or those who are not especially aware of the other people in their lane, such as those doing an amateur breaststroke with really wide arms and legs, can be very disruptive. I have been bashed into the lane dividers and really injured myself on more than one occasion (those plastic flotation things are HARD!). And just having to be constantly aware of what the other people in the lane are doing can really interrupt your own rhythm and forward momentum.

I guess it's just the price you have to pay for participating in a popular sport at a popular venue at a popular time. My recommendation is to go at a less popular time if possible, or if you have to enter a crowded lane, then choose the one that looks like it has the most experienced swimmers in it.
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  #7  
Old 05-29-2009
Jay Jay is offline
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My buddy swimmers commented that because I am small and swim quiet without much splash, I tend to attract others with big busy movement to the lane...!? Mmmm, thanks to TI, I guess...lol.

Last edited by Jay : 05-29-2009 at 03:43 PM.
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Old 05-31-2009
7am_swimmer 7am_swimmer is offline
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Hi Jay,

Your message made me smile because I had a similar experience just this morning and wanted to post about it here. I escaped from the crowded main pool to the completely deserted children's pool (which is over 30 meters long, too, at the "deep" end), and had a wonderful time practising and swimming there, with no turbulence at all and the most relaxed bilateral breathing ever.

But of course, when I returned to the main pool later, it was even harder to get used to the waves of a wide and fairly busy 50-meter outdoor pool with diving boards and no lane dividers. So I was wondering whether going to the more shallow and quiet pool for drills and very concentrated swimming is a good idea - or whether it's "cheating" and won't really help with learning to overcome the challenges of more "open" water.

Last edited by 7am_swimmer : 05-31-2009 at 04:11 PM.
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  #9  
Old 06-01-2009
daveblt daveblt is offline
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[quote=freshegg;3545]I often find that

[I do agree, though, that the turbulence created by other swimmers with "apparatus", or those who are not especially aware of the other people in their lane, such as those doing an amateur breaststroke with really wide arms and legs, can be very disruptive. I have been bashed into the lane dividers and really injured myself on more than one occasion (those plastic flotation things are HARD!). And just having to be constantly aware of what the other people in the lane are doing can really interrupt your own rhythm and forward momentum. ]



I can't stand sharing a lane with someone who likes to 'spread themselves out' all over the lane .A little common sense should tell you to stay on your side. Sometimes they hit you with their arms or legs.You gotta be careful with these types ,it can get dangerous !


Dave
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