Total Immersion Forums  

Go Back   Total Immersion Forums > Freestyle
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 03-13-2009
sasquatch sasquatch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Jordan, Utah
Posts: 62
sasquatch
Default

I'm about 6'6" 225, with fairly long legs (and "oversized" heavy feet) so balance has been a similar challenge for me too; mostly during freestyle and backstroke drills as mentioned by naj although I never thought of breaking my fins out again. Go get a pedicure (or at least paint your toenails) to reduce drag and lift your legs....only joking.

I'm fairly new to TI so I don't have a lot of technical suggestions. This may sound patronizing but don't worry about getting frustrated, or you probably will. If you're new to swimming for exercise in general it may take a while to feel comfortable, but it is entirely worth your effort. I've been swimming for exercise for several years, but never enjoyed it as much as I do since starting TI.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-15-2009
FredMcG FredMcG is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 23
FredMcG
Default

I guess floatation/buoyancy might have something to do with it, but I think that a bigger factor is the mass of your arms and shoulders (that are doing most of the work) relative to the mass of what you are dragging through the water. Without wanting to be accused of resorting to ludicrous analogies, I look at it like this: If you had a canoe race and gave one guy the normal paddle and another guy a set of chopsticks to paddle with, I know which one would win. No matter how strong you are, or what you do with those chopsticks, that canoe ain't going nowhere. If you tied a bowling ball to Phelps, even though he could still replicate his stroke (length and rate) he wouldn't go as fast. Needless to say, some people in this forum don't agree with this logic (or lack thereof).
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-15-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,077
shuumai
Send a message via Skype™ to shuumai
Default

Phelps is a good example. Say he had thinner arms and legs. He could still use his explosive push-offs with his body mass working with him to maintain momentum. He could still use his dolphin kick with both of his skinny legs working together as one larger unit for up to 15m. And think of the momentum he would have from a diving start.

Perhaps Phelps' backstroke would be the most affected, I think. His loping crawl may be the second most affected, but the loping seems to take advantage of body movement which his heavy core might help. Same with the breaststroke and even more so, I suppose, with the butterfly. I think his butterfly would be least affected.

I watched a video of Ed Moses last night. He mentioned that he works on developing the perfect technique for *his* body. No one technique, or stroke for that matter, is ideal for every body, but for every body there is an ideal technique. Ed said he tries everything to find what works better for him.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7l...brasse-1_sport
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-15-2009
Richardsk Richardsk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1,380
Richardsk
Default

If you compare Eamon Sullivan with Alain Bernard, Sullivan looks like a mere wisp of a thing by comparison and yet they swim very similar times. Bernard has hugely muscular shoulders that must do a terrific job of hauling his mighty physique through the water.

Jason Lezak lifts weights (I expect they all do nowadays) but doesn't exactly look like a muscle man. Even so he ran Bernard down.

Generally speaking,though, top sprinters are long tall fellows with big hands and feet, lungs of brass and wills of iron. The paddle has to match the canoe, I suppose, but it has to be a good paddle and be used properly.

For those of us who are never going to be Olympic champions the only way is to make the best use of the equipment we have.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-15-2009
Lloyd Lloyd is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Nevada
Posts: 9
Lloyd
Default

I have been working on the TI method feb 08. I did not know how to swim and chose this method to learn. I self taught the first time through with fins using the old vhs tape. To celebrate my first year of Ti I swam from cooper island to salt island in the British Virgin islands. from the sail boat anchorage to salt island was 3/4 mi 2ft chop and a 1 knot current. My first open swim. I used mask fins and snorkel because I could not breath in the choppy water. I know this is not a real open swim but it was my personal best I swam over and back followed by a boat in case I had trouble. I have begun to go through the complete TI method again, I have a swim buddy and we compare notes My biggest problem is still a weak kick and heavy legs. Skating without fins I loose propulsion and my legs start sinking I'm 6' 4" and weigh 200 lbs I know that kick is not that important but i need some to refine my balance in skate. any help?
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-15-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,077
shuumai
Send a message via Skype™ to shuumai
Default

Lloyd, I don't have any advice, but I do want to say, WOW, good job!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-16-2009
RadSwim RadSwim is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 201
RadSwim
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lloyd View Post
Skating without fins I loose propulsion and my legs start sinking
Skate with fins, switch without. After 4 years of continuously improving freestyle, I have learned that the static balance learned in skating isn't all that important. The more important balance is dynamic, as your body is rotating. Focus on remaining horizontal while switching -- it is a much better use of your time and energy.

Second recommendation -- shoot for a 3:00 leading arm unless your shoulders won't reach that high. With a lean build, a deep leading arm is likely to pull your body deep and make finding air difficult.

RadSwim
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-16-2009
freshegg freshegg is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Masterton, New Zealand
Posts: 22
freshegg
Default

Sorry, could you explain what you mean by "3:00" ?
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-16-2009
shuumai shuumai is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA
Posts: 1,077
shuumai
Send a message via Skype™ to shuumai
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by freshegg View Post
Sorry, could you explain what you mean by "3:00" ?
"3:00", or "3 o'clock," refers to the lead arm being level and pointing directly ahead, not necessarily at the surface. "4 o'clock" would be a slightly downward angle.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-17-2009
jang53 jang53 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8
jang53
Default

fredMcG,
I read your previous post and was wondering what you've done to overcome your floatation problems. When I try back balance, sweet spot or superman glide, I struggle with sinking like a rock unless I kick faster. I don't think I can get away with the slow, relaxed kick as advertised. I am new to this so there's probably more going on with my body position in the water than I'm aware of.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.