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  #1  
Old 09-20-2010
drone drone is offline
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Default TOTAL Immersion - head position

I have been swimming TI freestyle for about a year, allowing my head to drop to a relaxed position as described in the TI videos and books from which I have learned. However, when completely relaxed, my entire head is completely under the water. I imagine my profile might be like a hockey stick (if my arms were at my sides). I have no problems with rolling to air. Does this position create too much drag, and should I try to raise my head to be more in line with my body? Also, would my arms be slicing in at too steep an angle because of this position? Thanks for any advice.
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Old 09-20-2010
haschu33 haschu33 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drone View Post
... However, when completely relaxed, my entire head is completely under the water.
Ever heard the words 'Total Immersion' somewhere?


I think my head is totally gone, too. The drag is less, anyway, because the wave drag on the surface is the most costly. If you can still breathe easily - I think it's great.
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  #3  
Old 09-21-2010
andreasl33 andreasl33 is offline
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I would raise it to the point where it is in line with the body (while still fully submerged). As a dry-land exercise for your swimming posture, stand with your back against the wall and have as much of your back as possible touch the wall. That means the back of your head, the back of your chest, your butt, and your legs touch the wall. Whatever body part doesn't touch should at least come as close as possible. To do this, you will have to draw the upper part of your spine backwards, which will raise the head a bit. In swimming, don't raise it by nodding it, but by reducing the forward bend of your upper spine.
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Old 09-21-2010
KatieK KatieK is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andreasl33 View Post
I would raise it to the point where it is in line with the body (while still fully submerged). As a dry-land exercise for your swimming posture, stand with your back against the wall and have as much of your back as possible touch the wall. That means the back of your head, the back of your chest, your butt, and your legs touch the wall. Whatever body part doesn't touch should at least come as close as possible. To do this, you will have to draw the upper part of your spine backwards, which will raise the head a bit. In swimming, don't raise it by nodding it, but by reducing the forward bend of your upper spine.
I agree that you want your head and neck to be aligned with the spine. However, your head being underwater doesn't necessarily mean it is out of alignment. Men, tall people, and people with low body fat will naturally float a little lower in the water.

I suggest getting a video before you try to change your head position. Otherwise, you could end up "fixing" something that isn't broken.
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Old 09-21-2010
daveblt daveblt is offline
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You may want to check on a video if your entire head is actually under the surface or for someone to just watch you because if just a little of the back of your head is showing then that's ok. Make sure you are not pressing your head in but relaxing it in line with spine .

Dave

Last edited by daveblt : 09-22-2010 at 01:04 AM.
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  #6  
Old 09-21-2010
andreasl33 andreasl33 is offline
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BTW, as I understand it, the term total immersion does not refer to the head or the body but to a state of mind. The swimmer is totally immersed in what he/she is doing and minding all the nitty gritty details. Can somebody clear that up?
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Old 09-21-2010
downhillswimmer downhillswimmer is offline
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I found Coach Shane Eversfield's blog very useful:

http://www.totalimmersion.net/blog/Swimming-From-Your-Core.html


Personally, I feel that the back of my neck is completely relaxed. I also found the following ChiRunning posture video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPMzxU5bos0

I think correct body alignment applies to all kinds of activities.
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  #8  
Old 09-21-2010
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andreasl33 View Post
BTW, as I understand it, the term total immersion does not refer to the head or the body but to a state of mind. The swimmer is totally immersed in what he/she is doing and minding all the nitty gritty details. Can somebody clear that up?
I have seen a submerged-head swim style (ostensibly to cut resistance), and below-surface drills, but have yet to come upon a TI directive that one should swim under water.
You are correct.

Last edited by borate : 09-21-2010 at 06:36 PM.
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  #9  
Old 09-23-2010
LBRoberts LBRoberts is offline
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If your whole head is under the water then you will generate extra drag and that is not recommended. You may be 'burying your head'

Terry can correct me but Total Immersion does not advocate looking directly down, but down at a point around 5-6 feet in front of you.
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  #10  
Old 09-24-2010
borate borate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LBRoberts View Post
If your whole head is under the water then you will generate extra drag and that is not recommended. You may be 'burying your head'

Terry can correct me but Total Immersion does not advocate looking directly down, but down at a point around 5-6 feet in front of you.
http://www.totalimmersion.net/blog/P...entation-.html

Check out part four.
Though the head is relaxed in the water (back of the neck stretched out but chin not tucked, for good posture), the eyes may scan a bit forward or upwards.
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